Talk:The Nutcracker and the Mouse King

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Age[edit]

The Wiki article says that Marie is twelve and her brother Fritz is eight. That's wrong. I've just started reading the story and it says in the first lines that Marie just turned seven and that her brother is older than her (maybe a precise age is given later in the text?). In einem Winkel des Hinterstübchens zusammengekauert, saßen Fritz und Marie [...] Fritz entdeckte ganz insgeheim wispernd der jüngern Schwester (sie war eben erst sieben Jahr alt geworden) wie er schon seit frühmorgens es habe in den verschlossenen Stuben rauschen und rasseln, und leise pochen hören.

http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/?id=5&xid=601&kapitel=1#gb_found

Somebody should change that. I would, but I am not a native speaker and I don't know anything about Wiki editing. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.142.182.215 (talk) 20:34, 16 December 2010 (UTC)

So she's eight when they get married?--Mrcolj (talk) 01:33, 23 December 2013 (UTC)
okay, read the original. It basically gives a "but she never forgot those adventures... until one day she met Drosselmeier's nephew... And when a year had passed for their engagement..." So seven years old plus indeterminate time plus one means she was still a teenager, but probably not 8!--Mrcolj (talk) 02:28, 23 December 2013 (UTC)

I rented a movie with same name on DVD.[edit]

I rented it as an animation, just thought it might be notable addition. And according to the opening credits it is based on the story by E. T. A. Hoffmann.

I can't prove this in any way, but thought it would be notable to mention it. TheBlazikenMaster (talk) 17:41, 25 January 2008 (UTC)

The ballet version[edit]

The article says the ballet was based on Hoffmann's original tale from 1816, but other sources says it was based on Alexandre Dumas' version from 1844. Which one is correct? 80.202.40.85 (talk) 05:47, 23 December 2008 (UTC)

Historical context[edit]

Is the story an allegory for any historical events? If so a history section would be nice.--OMCV (talk) 03:02, 13 December 2009 (UTC)

Name of female character[edit]

Is the character Marie or Clara? The plot summary of the English Wikipedia article is using both names, though I assume in the original German version of the story the character is named Marie while in perhaps an English adaption she was renamed to Clara. If so please clarify which name is to be used in the 'plot summary' to avoid confusing people by using both. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 89.217.158.203 (talk) 22:21, 23 July 2011 (UTC)

Incorrect Order of Events[edit]

Hello! I was reading the Plot Synopsis after reading the original E.T.A story on Google Play (https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=UD30AAAAMAAJ) and I noticed a mistake in the article. The article states that Marie falls and cuts her arm after she throws her shoe at the Mouse King, but in the original story it states that she had fainted, and cut her arm before the battle had even started.

Heres a copy and paste from the original story:

"But there began a strange whistling and ringing all around; and a mouse-heads, with bright, gleaming crowns on them; and behind them wriggled a mouse's body, on which the seven heads had all grown; and thereupon the whole army of mice shouted in full chorus. They went trot, trot, right up on Marie, who was still standing close by the glass door of the cupboard. Half fainting, she sank back; and, with a crash, there fell in shivers to the ground the pane, which she had broken through with her elbow."

I've never edited an artical before so I'll leave it to the pros!

Thanks — Preceding unsigned comment added by 130.65.123.1 (talk) 05:45, 4 November 2013 (UTC)