Talk:Turnip cake

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Page move[edit]

Currently I have Daikon cake linked to this page. I am open to moving this page to either Daikon cake or Turnip cake just to make it more searchable. Once the name format is figured out, we can create the other cake pages to be consistent. Benjwong 01:24, 21 June 2007 (UTC)

One usually sees it on menus as "turnip cake," though you've convinced me that there's not any turnip in the dish! :-O But "Daikon cake" would be more accurate (though that's a Japanese vegetable name...). Maybe we could ask a few other of the active HK/Cantonese editors what they think, though there aren't many at the moment. I'm leaning toward "Turnip cake." Badagnani 01:34, 21 June 2007 (UTC)
Turnip cake is fine. I am having difficulties finding images for the other cakes with legit licensing usable for wiki. Benjwong 16:43, 21 June 2007 (UTC)
Just write to the Flickr photographers. They are usually very nice and happy to have their photo appear on Wikipedia, and agree to the terms. I can send you the text of one of the emails I've sent if you like. Badagnani 19:13, 21 June 2007 (UTC)
You must have some secret. But it doesn't stop with flickr. My luck of asking people for pictures is the same on 90% of the other sites. Make that 95%. Benjwong 05:28, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

Meat[edit]

I've always seen this dish with small pieces of pork impregnated through the whole cake. This should be mentioned in the article. Badagnani 01:48, 21 June 2007 (UTC)

Sure. Benjwong 05:28, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

Cantonese pronunciation[edit]

I'm sorry but I'll have to say that the Cantonese pronunciation "lo4 baak6 gao1" is wrong, as "gao1" is definitely Mandarin.

fixed. Benjwong 05:28, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

Lobag is not "turnip"[edit]

"Lobag" is Cantonese for "daikon". "Turnip" is an erroneous translation. Whoever put it on dimsum restaurants should correct this translation the first place. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Bestlyriccollection (talkcontribs) 22:57, 29 July 2007

Yeah, that's true but "turnip cake" does seem, in a massive way, to remain the favored English name for this dish on menus. Badagnani 05:01, 30 July 2007 (UTC)
I was for daikon earlier. It seems to be the correct but less commonly used name. Benjwong 06:19, 30 July 2007 (UTC)
The correct English translation of 萝卜糕 is 'radish cake', not 'turnip cake', or, God forbid: 'carrot cake'. Those are simple mistranslations. Those Chinese restaurateurs who had to write their menues in English didn't know better (and then others just adopted the wrong translation over and over again...) I suggest making 'radish cake' the main entry, and within the article, declaring the other terms misleading but somewhat widespread mistranslations.

I've never heard of "turnip cake" before, but I know chai-tow, and its mandarin synonym "luo-buo" or "ruo-buo", can refer to both white radish or carrots. Typically carrots are referred to as "hong ruo-buo" (red carrot) whereas white radishes, or daikon, are referred to as "bai ruo-buo" (white carrot). So that's likely where the "carrot cake" mistranslation comes from. Frankly, I think this article needs to be merged with chai tow kway, and "turnip cake" should simply be used as a redirect.--Subversive Sound (talk) 23:28, 11 April 2010 (UTC)

Chai tow kway[edit]

How is this different from Chai tow kway? Badagnani (talk) 08:39, 8 February 2008 (UTC)

recipe and cooking method[edit]

User:Badagnani reverted my edits, and I've just put them back. Now I'm commenting on the changes. I've cooked it this way, so pls clearly indicate what's factually incorrect about my changes instead of just a non-friendly revert. Well I admit the Chinese sausage doesn't need soaking, but it is an essential ingredient (left out of the recipe) except if the cook wants to make a vegetarian variant.

Firstly, the shitake are diced. Secondly, nothing is 'deep fried'; thirdly, seasoning should always take place after all the 'bulk' ingredients are put in, in this case the rice flour - there's no point in seasoning it before because you'll end up with a bland-tasting mixture. Also, rice flour doesn't dissolve in water, but is a suspension which will settle when left. I felt that mentioning 'steaming at high heat' is redundant: 'steaming' in Chinese cuisine always takes place at a high heat. And of course, the cake can only be sliced up when it is hardened, and there's less goo and mess when it's cooled somewhat. Ohconfucius (talk) 03:00, 23 June 2008 (UTC)