The Ring (franchise)

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Ring
Ring (film franchise logo).png
Created byKoji Suzuki
Original workNovel
Print publications
Novel(s)
  • Ring (1991)
  • Spiral (1995)
  • Loop (1998)
  • Birthday (1999)
  • S (2012)
  • Tide (2013)
Comics
  • Ring (1996)
  • Ring - Volume 1 (1999)
  • Ring - Volume 2 (1999)
  • Ring 2 (1999)
  • Spiral (1999)
  • Birthday (1999)
  • Ring 0: Birthday (2000)
Films and television
Film(s)
  • Ring: Kanzenban (1995)
  • Ring (1998)
  • Spiral (1998)
  • Ring 2 (1999)
  • The Ring Virus (1999)
  • Ring 0: Birthday (2000)
  • The Ring (2002)
  • The Ring Two (2005)
  • Sadako 3D (2012)
  • Sadako 3D 2 (2013)
  • Sadako vs. Kayako (2016)
  • Rings (2017)
Short film(s)Rings (2005)
Television series
  • Ring: The Final Chapter (1999)
  • Spiral (1999)
Television film(s)
  • Ring (1995)
Games
Video game(s)
Audio
Radio program(s)
  • Ring (1996)
  • Birthday (2000)
  • Ring (2015)
Soundtrack(s)
  • Ring/Spiral (1998)
  • Ring 2 (1999)
  • Ring: The Final Chapter (1999)
  • The Ring Virus (1999)
  • Spiral (1999)
  • Ring 0: Birthday (2000)
  • The Ring/The Ring Two (2005)
  • Rings (2017)

Ring (Japanese: リング, translit. Ringu), also known as The Ring, is a Japanese horror media franchise, based on the novel series of the same name written by Koji Suzuki. The franchise includes eight Japanese films, two television series, six manga adaptations, five international film remakes, and a video game.

The films revolve around a cursed videotape that kills anyone who watches it seven days later. It was created by psychic Sadako Yamamura, who was murdered by her adoptive father and thrown into a well. After her supposed death, she returned as a ghostly serial killer, killing anyone who fails to copy and then send the videotape to someone else under a 7 day deadline.

Novels[edit]

The franchise began with Koji Suzuki's 1991 novel Ring. It was the first of a trilogy, with two sequels: Spiral (1995) and Loop (1998).[1] Several later novels based on Ring were released: Birthday (1999), S (2012), and Tide (2013).

Japanese films[edit]

Four adaptions have been made of Suzuki's 1991 book Ring. The first was the Japanese television film Ring (titled Ring: Kanzenban for home video release), released in 1995. This remained the closest to the book but didn't have the success and recognition of the later films.

In 1998, Hideo Nakata made a new Japanese adaptation of the book in his film Ring, initiating the franchise. The original sequel to this was Rasen, an adaptation of Spiral (Suzuki's sequel to his first Ring book). However, due to poor reception, a new sequel, Ring 2, was released in 1999 which continued the storyline of Ring but was not based on Suzuki's books. This was followed by a 2000 prequel, Ring 0: Birthday, which was based on the short story "Lemonheart" from Suzuki's 1999 book, Birthday. These films delved into a uniquely different mythos surrounding Sadako and the cursed videotape. These changes led the franchise to attain a cult status, both domestically and internationally, popularizing the Japanese horror genre as a whole and the stringy black-haired yūrei trope.

In 2012, Sadako 3D was released, adapted from Suzuki's book S, and in and 2013 Sadako 3D 2 was released.

Hideo Nakata Timeline Rasen Timeline
Ring 0: Birthday (2000)
Ring (1998)
Ring 2 (1999) Rasen (aka Spiral, 1998)
Sadako 3D (2012)
Sadako 3D 2 (2013)

In 2016, Sadako vs. Kayako, directed by Kōji Shiraishi, was released. It is a crossover of the Ju-on and Ring series of horror films. It features Sadakaya, a ghost that resulted from the fusion of Sadako and the Ju-on antagonist Kayako Saeki.

International remakes[edit]

Five remakes were made from the original Japanese films, with one being made in South Korea and four being made in the United States of America.

The Ring Virus was the first remake to be made, in 1999, where the killer is renamed as Park Eun-suh, who is a hermaphrodite, unlike the biologically female Sadako in the films. Though the film copied multiple scenes from Ring, it is, like Ring: Kanzenban, very faithful to the original novel series.

In 2002, an American remake was made, titled The Ring, where the killer is renamed as Samara Morgan, who is a preteen instead of an adolescent woman. The Ring was one of the highest-grossing horror remakes, its box office gross surpassing that of Ring. Two sequels were made, including a short film, following its release, creating a distinct mythos that pertains exclusively to the American remake.

Film Director Writer(s) Producer(s)
The Ring (2002) Gore Verbinski Ehren Kruger Walter F. Parkes
Laurie MacDonald
The Ring Two (2005) Hideo Nakata
Rings (2017) F. Javier Gutierrez David Loucka
Jacob Aaron Estes
Akiva Goldsman

The Ring (2002)[edit]

Rachel Keller is a journalist investigating a videotape that may have killed four teenagers (including her niece). There is an urban legend about this tape: the viewer will die seven days after watching it. If the legend is correct, Rachel will have to run against time to save her son's and her own life.

The Ring Two (2005)[edit]

A high school student named Jake Pierce tries to make his girlfriend Emily watch the cursed videotape. But then Jake finds out that Emily covered her eyes and didn't watch the tape, and then Jake is killed by Samara Morgan from the first film. Rachel Keller learns of Jake's death and realizes she has to save her son Aidan from Samara.

Rings (2017)[edit]

A young woman finds herself on the receiving end of a terrifying curse that threatens to take her life in seven days.

Sequel[edit]

Paramount Vice Chairman Rob Moore said that should the film prove successful, more sequels could recur annually, taking the place of Paramount's Paranormal Activity series.[2] These plans were left in doubt following Moore's departure from the company.[3] In a post-release interview, Moore's successor, Megan Colligan, said that "time will tell" if another sequel is on the cards.[4] Following Colligan's departure, there has been no update on a sequel.[5]

Short film[edit]

Rings (2005)[edit]

Jake Pierce, a young teenager from The Ring Two watches a cursed video tape after joining a teen cult named "Rings". Join Jake as he lives the horrifying experiences of Samara Morgan's cursed tape.

American cast and crew[edit]

Cast[edit]

Key
  • A Y indicates the actor portrayed the role of a younger version of the character.
  • A V indicates the actor or actress lent only his or her voice for his or her film character.
  • A P indicates the actor or actress portrayed their film character as possessed by another.
  • An A indicates an appearance through archival footage.
  • A C indicates a cameo appearance.
  • A dark gray cell indicates the character was not in the film.
Characters Main films Short film
The Ring The Ring Two Rings Rings
2002 2005 2017 2005
Samara Morgan Kelly Stables Daveigh ChaseA
Bonnie Morgan
Kelly Stables
Daveigh Chase David DorfmanP Kelly Stables Zoe PessinV
Matilda LutzP
Anna Morgan Shannon Cochran Shannon CochranA
Rachel Keller Naomi Watts   Mentioned
Aidan Keller David Dorfman  
Noah Clay Martin Henderson  
Richard Morgan Brian Cox  
Ruth Embry Lindsay Frost  
Katherine "Katie" Embry Amber Tamblyn  
Rebecca "Becca" Kotler Rachael Bella  
Evelyn   Sissy Spacek
Mary Elizabeth WinsteadY
Kayli Carter
Mary Elizabeth WinsteadA
 
Jake Pierce   Ryan Merriman   Ryan Merriman
Emily   Emily VanCamp   Emily VanCamp
Eddie   Justin AllenVC   Justin Allen
Max Rourke   Simon Baker  
Dr. Emma Temple   Elizabeth Perkins  
Julia   Matilda Lutz  
Holt Anthony   Alex Roe  
Gabriel Brown   Johnny Galecki  
Skye Johnston   Aimee Teegarden  
Galen Burke   Mentioned Vincent D'Onofrio  
Carter   Zach Roerig  
Faith   Laura Slade Wiggins  
Kelly   Lizzie Brocheré  
Vanessa   Alexandra Breckenridge
Timothy "Tim" Rivers   Josh Wise

Crew[edit]

Crew/Detail Film
The Ring The Ring Two Rings
2002 2005 2017
Director Gore Verbinski Hideo Nakata F. Javier Gutiérrez
Producer(s) Walter F. Parkes
Laurie MacDonald
Writer(s) Screenplay by
Ehren Kruger
Based on
Ring
by Koji Suzuki
Ehren Kruger Screenplay by
David Loucka
Jacob Aaron Estes
Akiva Goldsman
Story by
David Loucka
Jacob Aaron Estes
Based on
Spiral
by Koji Suzuki
Composer Hans Zimmer Henning Lohner
Martin Tillman
Matthew Margeson
Director of photography Bojan Bazelli Gabriel Beristain Sharone Meir
Editor(s) Craig Wood Michael N. Knue Jeremiah O'Driscoll
Steve Mirkovich
Production companies BenderSpink
Parkes/MacDonald Productions
Parkes/MacDonald + Imagenatation
Distributor DreamWorks Pictures Paramount Pictures
Release date October 18, 2002 March 18, 2005 February 3, 2017
Running time 115 minutes 110 minutes 102 minutes

Reception[edit]

The original 1991 novel Ring sold 500,000 copies by January 1998, and 1.5 million copies by July 2000.[1]

Box office performance[edit]

Japanese films
Film Release date Box office gross Budget
Japan South Korea Other territories
Ring January 31, 1998 ¥1,000,000,000[6] ₩341,970,000[7][8] $6,247,335[a] $1.5 million[1]
Rasen January 31, 1998 ¥1,000,000,000[6] ₩25,482,000[15][16] N/A N/A
Ring 2 January 23, 1999 ¥2,100,000,000[17] ₩771,180,000[15][16] $117,493[18][11][12] N/A
Ring 0: Birthday January 22, 2000 ¥1,600,000,000[19] ₩40,642,000[15][20] N/A N/A
Sadako 3D May 12, 2012 ¥1,350,000,000[21] ₩1,128,635,032[15] $3,486,438[b] N/A
Sadako 3D 2 August 30, 2013 ¥688,494,993[24] ₩92,668,200[15] $1,375,682[25] N/A
Sadako vs. Kayako June 18, 2016 ¥1,000,000,000[26] ₩202,716,000[15] $704,922[27] N/A
Regional total ¥8,738,494,993 ($104,602,965) ₩2,603,293,232 ($2,367,323) $11,931,870 $1.5 million+
Worldwide total $118,902,158
American films
Film Release date Box office gross Budget Reference
North America Other territories Worldwide
The Ring October 18, 2002 $129,128,133 $120,220,800 $249,348,933 $48 million [28]
The Ring Two March 18, 2005 $76,231,249 $85,220,289 $161,451,538 $50 million [29]
Rings February 3, 2017 $27,793,018 $55,287,872 $83,080,890 $25 million [30]
Total $233,152,400 $260,728,961 $493,881,361 $123 million [31]
South Korean film
Film Release date Box office gross (South Korea) Budget
The Ring Virus June 12, 1999 ₩1,994,124,000[15][8] ($1,689,326)[12] N/A

Critical and public response[edit]

Film Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic CinemaScore
Ring 97% (38 reviews)[32] N/A N/A
Ring 2 0% (13 reviews)[33] N/A N/A
The Ring 72% (201 reviews)[34] 57 (36 reviews)[35] B–[36]
The Ring Two 20% (184 reviews)[37] 44 (37 reviews)[38] C+[39]
Rings 8% (105 reviews)[40] 25 (23 reviews)[41] C–[42]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Ring (1998) overseas box office:
    • Chile – $44,598[9]
    • France – €506,160[10][11] ($452,737)[12]
    • Hong Kong – HK$31.2 million (US$4.03 million)[13]
    • Taiwan – NT$50.83 million[14] (US$1.72 million)
  2. ^ Sadako 3D (2012) overseas box office:
    • Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan – US$2,263,295[22]
    • Russia, Thailand – $1,223,143[23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The "Ring" Master: Interview With Hideo Nakata". Offscreen. July 21, 2000. Retrieved February 10, 2001.
  2. ^ "CinemaCon: Paramount Pictures Teases Upcoming Slate". Coming Soon.
  3. ^ Lang, Ramin Setoodeh,Brent (2016-09-23). "Rob Moore Out at Paramount Pictures (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Retrieved 2017-04-22.
  4. ^ "Box Office: 'Split' Tops 'Rings,' as 'Space Between Us' Bombs". Reuters. 2017-02-05. Retrieved 2017-04-22.
  5. ^ "Jim Gianopulos Statement To Paramount Employees: Interim Team In Place After Megan Colligan Exit". Deadline. 2017-11-06. Retrieved 2017-11-07.
  6. ^ a b "1998年(1月~12月)". Eiren (in Japanese). Motion Picture Producers Association of Japan. Retrieved October 13, 2015.
  7. ^ "영화정보". KOFIC. Korean Film Council. Retrieved 1 February 2019. The Ring
  8. ^ a b Park, Seung Hyun (2000). "Average Ticket Prices in Korea, 1974-1997". A Cultural Interpretation of Korean Cinema, 1988-1997. Indiana University. p. 119. 1997 [...] Foreign [...] 6,000
  9. ^ "Ringu". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  10. ^ "Ring (1998)". JP's Box Office. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  11. ^ a b "Dissemination of European cinema in the European Union and the international market" (PDF). Jacques Delors Institute. UniFrance. November 2014. p. 28. Retrieved 11 February 2019.
  12. ^ a b c "Official exchange rate (LCU per US$, period average)". World Bank. Retrieved 11 February 2019.
  13. ^ Ma, Kevin. "Doraemon sets box office record in Hong Kong". Film Business Asia. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved March 4, 2015.
  14. ^ "破鬼后貞子17年紀錄 《你的名字》稱霸台北日片票房 - 自由娛樂". Liberty Times. 2016-11-04. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g "영화정보". KOFIC. Korean Film Council. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  16. ^ a b "Korean Film Newsletter #7". KoreanFilm.org. August 7, 2000. Retrieved February 11, 2019.
  17. ^ "1999年(1月~12月)". Eiren (in Japanese). Motion Picture Producers Association of Japan. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  18. ^ "Ring 2 (1999)". JP's Box-Office. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  19. ^ "2000年(平成12年)興収10億円以上番組" (PDF). Eiren (in Japanese). Motion Picture Producers Association of Japan. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  20. ^ "Screen Industry Snapshot Korea". Austrade. Government of Australia. 26 September 2017. p. 49. Retrieved 11 February 2019.
  21. ^ "2012". Eiren. Motion Picture Producers Association of Japan. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  22. ^ "Sadako 3D (2012) - International". The Numbers. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  23. ^ "Sadako 3D (2012)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  24. ^ "Japanese Box Office, September 28-29". Anime News Network. 2013-10-06. Retrieved 2013-10-30.
  25. ^ "Sadako 2 3D". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  26. ^ "2016". Eiren. Motion Picture Producers Association of Japan. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  27. ^ "Sadako vs. Kayako". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  28. ^ "The Ring". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  29. ^ "The Ring". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  30. ^ "Rings". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  31. ^ "The Ring series". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved March 10, 2018.
  32. ^ "Ringu (Ring) (1998)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  33. ^ "Ringu 2 (Ring 2) (2005)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  34. ^ "The Ring". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 2014-07-29.
  35. ^ "The Ring". Metacritic. Retrieved 2007-07-19.
  36. ^ "CinemaScore". cinemascore.com. Retrieved April 14, 2018.
  37. ^ "The Ring Two". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 2012-11-06.
  38. ^ "The Ring Two Reviews, Ratings, Credits". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 2012-11-06.
  39. ^ "CinemaScore". cinemascore.com. Retrieved April 14, 2018.
  40. ^ "Rings (2017)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved February 16, 2017.
  41. ^ "Rings reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved February 10, 2017.
  42. ^ "CinemaScore". cinemascore.com. Retrieved April 14, 2018.