Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy

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Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy
Founded1984
Abolished1991
Number of teams6
Last championsDynamo Kyiv (1st title)
Most successful club(s)Paris SG (2 titles)

The Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy was a mid-season indoor football invitational competition hosted by French club Paris Saint-Germain at the AccorHotels Arena in Paris, France. The tournament was founded in 1984 and was held annually until 1991. Played indoors (synthetic field and seven-a-side), the competition featured host club PSG and five more teams.[1]

1983 European champions Hamburger won the inaugural 1984 edition, which also featured hosts Paris SG, French clubs Monaco and Bordeaux, Brazilian team Fluminense and Algerian side Tizi Ouzou (currently named JS Kabylie). Ukrainian club Dynamo Kyiv, for its part, won the tournament's last edition in 1991.[1]

Paris Saint-Germain is the most successful club in the competition's history, despite failing to win it until the 4th edition. The Parisians lifted the trophy on two occasions (1987 and 1990), thus becoming the only club to have won the tournament more than once. Besides Hamburger and Dynamo Kyiv, German side Köln, Belgian outfit Anderlecht, Brazilian team Santos and Dutch club Ajax also won the competition once.[1]

Rules[edit]

The tournament was played at the AccorHotels Arena synthetic indoor sports arena during two evenings. It consisted of two phases. In the first phase, competing teams were divided into two groups of three teams (Group A and Group B). In the second phase, the winners of each group and the best third-ranked side progressed to the winners group (Group places 1-3), while the remaining three teams went to the ranking group (Group places 4-6). Two points for a win, one point for a draw.[1][2]

A match consisted of two halves of 14 minutes each. There was a 2-minute half-time break between halves. Each team consisted of a maximum of seven players (excluding substitutes), one of whom had to be the goalkeeper. The number of substitutions permitted were unlimited. A game was officiated by a referee. The referee was assisted by one assistant referee. A yellow card led to a temporary exclusion of 2 minutes, while a red card required the player to leave the field of play immediately, forcing the team to play a man fewer. It also resulted in the suspension of the offending player for the next match.[1][2]

The offside rule did not apply. A shot on goal could only be made from the opposing side. Indoor football courts are delimited by walls instead of lines, and there are no player throw-ins. Therefore, players were allowed to play with the walls. If the ball flew over the walls or contacted the ceiling, play was stopped and the team opposing the one that most recently touched the ball was awarded a free kick at the location where the ball left the arena or made contact with the ceiling. In case of a foul in the penalty area, the shot is taken from the penalty mark, which is 9 meters from the goal line. Goals are also smaller than in standard football and the penalty area is also smaller. The field is commonly 61m by 26m.[1][2]

Tiebreakers[edit]

The ranking of teams in the groups were determined as follows:[1][2]

  1. Points obtained in all group matches;
  2. Goal difference in all group matches;
  3. Number of goals scored in all group matches.

Tournaments[edit]

Edition Year Winner Runner-up Third Fourth Fifth Sixth Source
1 1984 Germany Hamburger France Monaco Japan Tizi Ouzou Brazil Fluminense France Paris SG France Bordeaux [3]
2 1985 Belgium Anderlecht Germany Bayern Munich Morocco Morocco France Auxerre Brazil Flamengo France Paris SG [4]
3 1986 Brazil Santos Germany Mönchengladbach Belgium Liège Spain Real Sociedad France Paris SG Croatia Hajduk Split [5]
4 1987 France Paris SG France Marseille Portugal Porto Germany Bayern Munich France Bordeaux Tunisia Tunisia [6]
5 1988 Germany Köln Russia Spartak Moscow France Nantes France Auxerre France Paris SG Brazil Botafogo [7]
6 1989 Netherlands Ajax France Nantes Serbia Red Star Belgrade France Paris SG Senegal Senegal Spain Real Sociedad [8]
7 1990 France Paris SG Sweden Malmö France Nantes Portugal Porto Serbia Partizan England Aston Villa [9]
8 1991 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv Germany Werder Bremen Croatia Hajduk Split Portugal Benfica France Paris SG Tunisia Espérance [10]

Titles by club[edit]

Club Winners Years won
France Paris SG 2 1987, 1990
Germany Hamburger 1 1984
Belgium Anderlecht 1 1985
Brazil Santos 1 1986
Germany Köln 1 1988
Netherlands Ajax 1 1989
Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 1 1991

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy". RSSSF. 5 October 2003. Retrieved 12 August 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d "PSG – Hambourg 4-5, 14/02/84, amical en salle 83-84". Archives Paris Football. 28 July 2015. Retrieved 12 August 2018.
  3. ^ "1984 Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy". RSSSF. 5 October 2003. Retrieved 12 August 2018.
  4. ^ "1985 Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy". RSSSF. 5 October 2003. Retrieved 12 August 2018.
  5. ^ "1986 Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy". RSSSF. 5 October 2003. Retrieved 12 August 2018.
  6. ^ "1987 Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy". RSSSF. 5 October 2003. Retrieved 12 August 2018.
  7. ^ "1988 Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy". RSSSF. 5 October 2003. Retrieved 12 August 2018.
  8. ^ "1989 Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy". RSSSF. 5 October 2003. Retrieved 12 August 2018.
  9. ^ "1990 Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy". RSSSF. 5 October 2003. Retrieved 12 August 2018.
  10. ^ "1991 Tournoi Indoor de Paris-Bercy". RSSSF. 5 October 2003. Retrieved 12 August 2018.

External links[edit]

Official websites