Types of swords

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This is a list of types of swords.

The term sword used here is a narrow definition. This is not a general list of bladed weapons and does not include the machete or similar "sword-like" weapons.

African swords[edit]

North African swords[edit]

East African swords[edit]

  • Billao (Somali)
  • Shotel (Ethiopian)
  • Gorade (Sometimes also Romanticized as "Gurade") (Ethiopian)

West African swords[edit]

  • Ida (Yoruban)
  • Eben (Benin - Yoruba name: Bini, Local name: UBinu)
  • Ada (Benin - Yoruba name: Bini, Local name: UBinu)
  • Akrafena (Akan, specifically big with the Ashante (i,ee))
  • Nsuaefena (Akan, specifically big with the Ashante (i,ee))
  • Afenatene (Akan, specifically big with the Ashante (i,ee))
  • Afenanta (Akan, specifically big with the Ashante (i,ee))
  • Mpomponsuo (Akan, specifically big with the Ashante (i,ee))
  • Bosomfena (Akan, specifically big with the Ashante (i,ee))

Central African swords[edit]

Southern African swords[edit]

Asian swords[edit]

East Asian swords[edit]

China
Japan
Korea

Southeast Asian swords[edit]

Swords and knives found in Southeast Asia are influenced by Indian, Chinese as well as Middle Eastern and European forms.

Indonesia/Malaysia
Myanmar
Philippines
Thailand

South Asian Swords[edit]

Bhutan
India
Nepal
Sri Lanka

West and Central Asian swords[edit]

All of the Islamic world during the 16th to 18th century, including the Ottoman Empire and Persia were influenced by the "scimitar" type of single-edged curved sword. Via the Mameluke sword this also gave rise to the European cavalry sabre.

Terms for the "scimitar" curved sword:

European swords[edit]

Ancient history[edit]

Post-classical history[edit]

Modern history[edit]

20th century[edit]

North American swords[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]