1890s in film

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The decade of the 1890s in film involved some significant events.

Events[edit]

ten remaining frames of London's Trafalgar Square taken by Wordsworth Donisthorpe in 1890
  • 1890 – Wordsworth Donisthorpe and W. C. Crofts film London's Trafalgar Square[1] using a camera patented in 1889.[2]
  • 1891 – Following the work of Eadweard Muybridge, Étienne-Jules Marey, and George Eastman, Thomas Edison employee William Kennedy Dickson finishes work on a motion-picture camera and a viewing machine called the Kinetoscope.
  • May 20, 1891 – Thomas Edison holds the first public presentation of his Kinetoscope for the National Federation of Women's Clubs.
  • August 24, 1891 – Edison files for a patent of the Kinetoscope.
  • 1892 – In France, Charles-Émile Reynaud began to have public screenings in Paris at the Théâtre Optique, with hundreds of drawings on a reel that he wound through his Zoetrope projector to construct moving images that continued for 15 minutes.
  • 1892 – The Eastman Company becomes the Eastman Kodak Company.
  • March 14, 1893 - Edison is granted Patent #493,426 for "An Apparatus for Exhibiting Photographs of Moving Objects" (the Kinetoscope).
  • 1893 – Edison builds a motion-picture studio near his laboratory, dubbed the "Black Maria" by his staff.
  • May 9, 1893 – In America, Edison holds the first public exhibition of films shot using his Kinetograph (the camera) at the Brooklyn Institute. Unfortunately, only one person at a time could use his Kinetoscope viewing machine.
  • January 7, 1894 – Edison films his assistant, Fred Ott sneezing with the Kinetoscope at the "Black Maria."
  • April 14, 1894 – The first commercial presentation of the Kinetoscope takes place in the Holland Brothers' Kinetoscope Parlor at 1155 Broadway, New York City.
  • 1894 – Kinetoscope viewing parlors begin to open in major cities. Each parlor contains several machines.
  • 1895 – In France, brothers named Auguste and Louis Lumière design and build a lightweight, hand-held motion picture camera called the Cinématographe. The brothers discover that their machine can also be used to project images onto a large screen. They create several short films at this time that are considered to be pivotal in the history of motion pictures.
  • November 1895 – In Germany, Emil and Max Skladanowsky develop their own film projector.
  • December 1895 – In France, the Lumière brothers hold their first public screening of films shot with their Cinématographe.
  • January 1896 – In Britain, Birt Acres and Robert W. Paul develop their own film projector, the Theatrograph (later known as the Animatograph).
  • January 1896 – In the United States, a projector called the Vitascope is designed by Charles Francis Jenkins and Thomas Armat. Armat begins to work with Edison to manufacture the Vitascope, which projects motion pictures.
  • April 1896 – Edison and Armat's Vitascope is used to project motion pictures in public screenings in New York City.
  • 1896 – French magician and filmmaker Georges Méliès begins experimenting with the new motion picture technology, developing many early special effects techniques, including stop-motion photography.
  • 1897 – A total of 125 people die during a film screening at the Charity Bazaar in Paris after a curtain catches on fire from the ether used to fuel the projector lamp.
  • 1899 – Pathé-Frères is founded.

Births[edit]

Lists of films[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Burns, Paul T, The History of The Discovery of Cinematography - 1885–1889, retrieved 2009-05-10  and Ten Remaining Frames Of Donisthorpe's 1890 'Trafalgar Square' Footage Come To Life (GIF), retrieved 2009-05-10 
  2. ^ Herbert, S. (1998), Industry, Liberty, and a Vision: Wordsworth Donisthorpe's Kinesigraph, London: The Projection Box, ISBN 0-9523941-3-8