2010 EK139

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2010 EK139
2010 EK139
Las Campanas Observatory discovery images of 2010 EK139
Discovery[1]
Discovered by A. Udalski
S. S. Sheppard
M. Kubiak
C. Trujillo
Las Campanas Observatory (304)
Discovery date 2010-03-13
Designations
MPC designation 2010 EK139
Minor planet category TNO (SDO)[2]
2:7[3]
Orbital characteristics[4]
Epoch JD 2456400.5 (18 April 2013)
Aphelion 105.57 AU (Q)
Perihelion 32.515 AU (q)
69.04 AU (a)
Eccentricity 0.5291
573.7 yr
343.90° (M)
Inclination 29.4529°
346.1636°
284.74°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 470+35
−10
km[5]
Albedo 0.25+0.02
−0.05
[5]
19.9[6]
19.6R[3]
3.8 ± 0.1[5]

2010 EK139[7] is a trans-Neptunian object orbiting the Sun in the scattered disc. It was discovered in 2010 by astronomers from the OGLE team led by Andrzej Udalski from Warsaw University.[8] With an absolute magnitude (H) of 3.8,[4] it is very likely a dwarf planet.[9]

Distance[edit]

It will come to perihelion around 2038[4] and is currently 39.1 AU from the Sun.[6]

It has been observed 122 times over five oppositions and has an orbit quality of 2.[4] There are precovery images dating back to 2002.[3] A ten-million-year integration of the orbit shows that this object is in a 2:7 resonance with Neptune.[3]

Physical properties[edit]

In 2010, the thermal radiation of 2010 EK139 was observed by the Herschel Space Telescope, which allowed astronomers to estimate its diameter at about 470 kilometres (290 mi).[5]

Observations by Mike Brown, using the Keck telescope in March 2012, suggest that there is no satellite, which makes determination of its mass impossible.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MPEC 2010-G49 : 2010 EK139". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2010-04-08. Retrieved 2010-12-03. 
  2. ^ "List Of Centaurs and Scattered-Disk Objects". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2010-12-02. 
  3. ^ a b c d Marc W. Buie (2010-04-09 using 32 of 32 observations). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 10EK139". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2010-12-02. 
  4. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2010 EK139)". 2011-04-11 last obs. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Pál, A.; Kiss, C.; Müller, T. G.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Vilenius, E.; Szalai, N.; Mommert, M.; Lellouch, E.; Rengel, M.; Hartogh, P.; Protopapa, S.; Stansberry, J.; Ortiz, J. -L.; Duffard, R.; Thirouin, A.; Henry, F.; Delsanti, A. (2012). ""TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region. VII. Size and surface characteristics of (90377) Sedna and 2010 EK139". Astronomy & Astrophysics 541: L6. arXiv:1204.0899. Bibcode:2012A&A...541L...6P. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201218874.  edit
  6. ^ a b "AstDys 2010EK139 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2010-12-11. 
  7. ^ "MPEC 2010 G50 : 2010 EK139". MPC. 8 April 2010. Archived from the original on 14 May 2010. Retrieved 4 May 2010. 
  8. ^ Krzysztof Urbański (4 May 2010). "Układ Słoneczny coraz większy". Rzeczpospolita. Retrieved 4 May 2010.  (English translation)
  9. ^ Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2012-05-08. 

External links[edit]