Armenoid race

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Illustration of an Armenoid Lebanese from Ripley (1911)
Illustration of an Armenoid Syrian Armenian from The Races of Europe: A Sociological Study by William Zebina Ripley (1911)

The Armenoid in physical anthropology, is a subtype of the Caucasian race.[1] "The countries of the northern part of Western Asia, namely Anatolia (Turkey), the Caucasus, Iran, and the Levant are the center of distribution" of the Armenoid Race.[2]

Origin, distribution and physiognomy[edit]

Carleton S. Coon wrote that the Armenoid racial type is very similar to the Dinaric race. The only difference is that Armenoids have a slightly darker pigmentation. He described the Armenoid as a sub-race of the Caucasoid race. Armenoids were said to be found throughout Eurasia. However, the largest concentrations occurred within Anatolia, Transcaucasia, Iran, and Mesopotamia. Known as the "true" Caucasians, Armenoids were relatively tall, usually with medium to dark brown or black hair, light to medium skin colour, large round eyes that were usually brown; a round, brachycephalic head shape with a straight backing (planocciput) (see Cephalic index), high cheekbones and non-prominent chins. Lips were full, and noses were sometimes aquiline. Large minority of Armenoids have blond hair and blue, green, or hazel eyes. It was also an element in Southern Europe. Renato Biasutti described the Armenoid race as having: "Opaque-white skin, brunet hair and eyes, abundant pilosity; medium stature (166), sturdy body build; wide head with rounded occiput (87); very long face, straight and narrow nose (57) with high bridge; thin lips, narrow eye opening."[3]

It has long been believed by physical anthropologists that the quintessence of Near Eastern brachycephaly is to be found in the Armenians; the racial term Armenoid being named for them. The Armenians have long been established in the territory which is now only partly theirs; they had, before the arrival of the Turks, a powerful kingdom, which covered most of the territory between the Gulf of Alexandretta and the Caucasus.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ripley, William Z. (1899). The Races of Europe: A Sociological Study. D. Appleton & Company. p. 444. 
  2. ^ "Carleton Coon, "Racial Distribution map"". Retrieved 1 May 2014. 
  3. ^ http://dienekes.110mb.com/texts/biasutticaucasoid/
  4. ^ The Races of Europe by Carleton Stevens Coon - (Chapter XII, section 18)