Atimonan, Quezon

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Atimonan
Municipality
Side view of Our Lady of the Angels Parish in Atimonan, Quezon.JPG
Official seal of Atimonan
Seal
Nickname(s): Yanung Ganda ng Atimonan ay!
Motto: Pag nagtulungan, Panalo ang Bayan!
Map of Quezon showing the location of Atimonan
Map of Quezon showing the location of Atimonan
Atimonan is located in Philippines
Atimonan
Atimonan
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 14°00′N 121°55′E / 14.000°N 121.917°E / 14.000; 121.917Coordinates: 14°00′N 121°55′E / 14.000°N 121.917°E / 14.000; 121.917
Country Philippines
Region CALABARZON (Region IV-A)
Province Quezon
District 4th district of Quezon
Founded February 4, 1608
Barangays 42
Government[1]
 • Mayor Jose F. Mendoza (Nacionalista)
 • Vice Mayor Joel M. Vergano (UNA[disambiguation needed])
Area[2]
 • Total 239.66 km2 (92.53 sq mi)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 61,587
 • Density 260/km2 (670/sq mi)
Time zone PST (UTC+8)
ZIP code 4331
Dialing code 42
Income class 1st class; partially urban
Website www.atimonan.gov.ph

The Municipality of Atimonan (Filipino: Bayan ng Atimonan) or in (Spanish/Chavacano: El Pueblo de Atimonan) is a first class municipality in the province of Quezon, Philippines. It lies on the western shore of the province, 173 kilometres (107 mi) southeast of Manila. Atimonan is bounded by the municipalities of Gumaca, Plaridel, Pagbilao and Padre Burgos. According to the 2010 census, it has a population of 61,587 people.[3]

Barangays[edit]

Atimonan is politically subdivided into 42 barangays.[2]

  • Angeles
  • Balubad
  • Balugohin
  • Barangay Zone 1 (Pob.)
  • Barangay Zone 2 (Pob.)
  • Barangay Zone 3 (Pob.)
  • Barangay Zone 4 (Pob.)
  • Buhangin
  • Caridad Ibaba
  • Caridad Ilaya
  • Habingan
  • Inaclagan
  • Inalig
  • Kilait
  • Kulawit
  • Lakip
  • Lubi
  • Lumutan
  • Magsaysay
  • Malinao Ibaba
  • Malinao Ilaya
  • Malusak
  • Manggalayan Bundok
  • Manggalayan Labak
  • Matanag
  • Montes Balaon
  • Montes Kallagan
  • Ponon
  • Rizal
  • San Andres Bundok
  • San Andres Labak
  • San Isidro
  • San Jose Balatok
  • San Rafael
  • Santa Catalina
  • Sapaan
  • Sokol
  • Tagbakin
  • Talaba
  • Tinandog
  • Villa Ibaba
  • Villa Ilaya

History[edit]

There were conflicting stories on how Atimonan got its name. Some concluded that the name Atimonan originated from a tree known as Atimon alleged to have been prevalent in the area and had reportedly served many uses to the residents. These trees are now extinct and its non-existence could not be accounted for.

Others say it came from the words atin muna, signifying a policy, unity of feeling and sentiments among the residents that bolster their spirit in the fight against their enemies during that time.

But the most popular version is that it originated from the name of its founder, Simeona Mangaba, known to her town mates as Ate Monang. She is a woman reputed to be of unquestionable leadership, which the people regarded as their adopted parent, leader and protector.

Ate Monang was the eldest sister of Francisco Mangaba, the first captain of the town. She founded the town on February 4, 1608 along the banks of the big Maling River, now known as Atimonan River.

Living along the river bank, the people has always been a prey to Moro attacks and so for fear of Moro reprisals, the inhabitants decided to transfer to Palsabangon, now a barrio of Pagbilao, Quezon. However, the people felt discontented in Palsabangon because the place abounds in wild crocodiles that from time to time disturbed them.

So, after two years of stay (1610), they left the place and transferred to Babyaw, a part of Atimonan. They settled in Babyaw for almost 14 years, but transferred again to another site called Minanukan for some unknown reasons.

In 1635, they again transferred to another place called Bisita, but some families separated from the majority and settled in Yawe, now San Isidro, a barrio in Padre Burgos, Quezon.

The next year, when Simeona Mangaba learned of what happened to the original group of settlers, she, together with Fray Geronimo de Jesus, a Spanish friar, tried to unite them once more and convinced them to return to the place where it was first founded. The place known now as Bagumbayan, this was during the time of Captain Pablo Garcia.

Today, Atimonan is a fast growing town known for its cleanliness, beautiful beaches, many historical and natural scenery and most of all warm and peace-loving people.

On December 23, 1941, The occupation of the Japanese Imperial Army forces entering the towns and landing beaches in Atimonan, Tayabas (now. Quezon).

On January to August 1945, local Filipino troops of the 5th, 51st, 52nd, 53rd, 55th, 56th and 57th Infantry Division of the Philippine Commonwealth Army and 5th Infantry Regiment of the Philippine Constabulary was liberated in Atimonan and helped the guerrilla resistance fighters under the Marking's Guerrillas and the President Quezon's Own Guerrillas (PQOG) and the American liberating troops of the United States Army 1st Cavalry Division and the 11th Airborne Division to fought against the Japanese forces and ended in World War II.

Liberation and the Battle of Atimonan[edit]

Battle of Atimonan
Part of World War II, the 1944–1945 Philippine Campaign and Pacific War
Date January to August 1945
Location Atimonan, Tayabas (now. Quezon)
Result Allied Victory, Allied forces and guerrilla fighters captured and liberated Atimonan, Tayabas.
Belligerents
 Philippine Commonwealth

 United States

 Empire of Japan
Strength


Imperial Japanese Military
Japanese 14th Area Army
Japanese 41st Area Army
~ 74,000 Japanese troops
Casualties and losses
Philippine Commonwealth Military
6,800 killed
17,000 wounded
Tayabasin Guerrilla Resistance
480 killed
1,743 wounded
United States Military
2,800 killed
5,320 wounded
Imperial Japanese Military
28,000 killed
64,000 wounded
7,900 captured

Beginning the Liberation and the Battle of Atimonan on January to August 1945 between the fought the main battles of the combined U.S. and Philippine Commonwealth liberation military forces and aided the local guerrilla resistance fighters and defeating attack and fought against the Imperial Japanese military forces in Atimonan, Tayabas (now. Quezon). On January 1945, many stronghold of all local military forces of the Filipino soldiers and military officers under the Philippine Commonwealth Army 5th, 51st, 52nd, 53rd, 55th, 56th and 57th Infantry Division and Philippine Constabulary 5th Infantry Regiment has the sending the local military operations in the town of Atimonan, Tayabas from the local P.C.A. and P.C. military GHQ and military camp bases in Tayabas provinces and some parts in Northern and Southern Luzon and Bicol Peninsula was they recaptured and liberated the entered the town in Atimonan, Tayabas and aiding the local guerrilla resistance fighters under the Col. Marking's Guerrillas and the President Quezon's Own Guerrillas (PQOG) and attacking Japanese troops.

From February to April 1945, the main battles and invading commands of all stronghold of local Filipino soldiers, military officers, tank commanders, military trucks and jeeps, military IFV's, artillery and mortars and many other military engagements under the 5th, 51st, 52nd, 53rd, 55th, 56th and 57th Infantry Division of the Philippine Commonwealth Army and the 5th Infantry Regiment of the Philippine Constabulary was around side by side in the town of Atimonan and they entered and they recaptured from the plains, rice fields, rivers and forests are destroyed and bombed and they recaptured and entering invasion around the town streets, old Roman Catholic churches, municipal town halls, town plazas and many others are destroyed and bombings and aiding the local guerrilla resistance under the Col. Marking's Guerrillas and the President Quezon's Own Guerrillas (PQOC) and defeated Japanese Imperial Army forces from the couple of three months of one year during the fighting for the liberation before the American troops was captured the town.

On April 10, 1945, the American liberation military forces under the 1st Cavalry Division and the 11th Airborne Division of the United States Army was captured in Atimonan, Tayabas and they helped and aiding the local Filipino ground troops under the Philippine Commonwealth Army and Philippine Constabulary units and the local guerrilla resistance fighters and defeated and attacking Japanese soldiers. The re-establishment of the joint and combined military camps and bases of the Philippine Commonwealth Army, Philippine Constabulary and the United States Army was the military active on April 1945 in Atimonan during the fighting.

On April to August 1945 after the capturing the American liberation forces in the town on last April, the joint and combined military forces of the Filipino soldiers under the Philippine Commonwealth Army 5th, 51st, 52nd, 53rd, 55th, 56th and 57th Infantry Division and Philippine Constabulary 5th Infantry Regiment, the local guerrilla fighters under the Col. Marking's Guerrillas and the President Quezon's Own Guerrillas (PQOG) and the American soldiers under the United States Army units of the 1st Cavalry Division and the 11th Airborne Division was surrounded the main battles and invading commands from the couple of six months before the liberated fought side by side around the town in Atimonan and they surprise attack and entering Japanese Imperial Army forces.

The local and combined military and guerrilla raid and invasion of the military general headquarters of the Imperial Japanese Armed Forces in Atimonan, Tayabas in 1945 and they recaptured and invaded by the all the combined U.S. and Philippine Commonwealth military forces including the local recognized guerrilla groups entering the Japanese Military GHQ's in the municipal town. After the local and joint military and guerrilla raid sieges of the Japanese Military GHQ's in Atimonan, many the combined U.S. and Philippine Commonwealth ground forces included with the local guerrilla resistance fighters was captured and taken the Japanese Military GHQ in Atimonan and they surrendering Japanese Imperial forces. When the combined U.S. and Philippine Commonwealth ground forces included with the local guerrilla resistance fighters inside the capturing Japanese Military GHQ's has downed the flag pole raised of the Japanese flag of the Imperial Japanese military through the up the flag pole raised of the American and Philippine flag for the combined U.S. & Philippine Commonwealth military after the fighting the siege commands.

The aftermath of the Battle of Atimonan on August 1945, the local and combined military and guerrilla resistance casualties was founded of the fighting and succeeding battles, sieges and invasions included the Filipino troops of the Philippine Commonwealth Army and Philippine Constabulary units over 6,800 killed in action and 17,000 wounded in action, while the local guerrilla fighters under the Col. Marking's Guerrillas and the President Quezon's Own Guerrillas (PQOG) suffered over 480 killed in action and 1,743 wounded in action, the American troops of the United States Army over 2,800 killed in action over 5,320 wounded. On the part of the Japanese Imperial forces over 28,000 killed in action, 64,000 wounded in action and 7,900 captured in action. the combined U.S. and Philippine Commonwealth military ground forces with the local guerrilla groups was saluted and the successfully victories after the battle of war and they captured in Atimonan, Tayabas.

Demographics[edit]

Population census of Atimonan
Year Pop.   ±% p.a.  
1990 46,651 —    
1995 54,283 +2.88%
2000 56,716 +0.94%
2007 59,157 +0.58%
2010 61,587 +1.48%
Source: National Statistics Office[3]

People from Atimonan are called Atimonanins. The primary language is Tagalog, with many local phrases and expressions. Manilans usually understand Atimonan Tagalog, albeit with some frustrations. Many Atimonanins are part Chinese or Spanish. Some Atimonanins can also speak Bicolano, Lan-nang, or Spanish.

Religion[edit]

The dominant religion in Atimonan is Roman Catholic, though there is a significant following of the Iglesia Ni Cristo. The culture in Atimonan is primarily ingrained in rural maritime Filipino settings. Other religions present are:

  • Iglesia Ni Cristo
  • Seventh Day Adventist
  • Jehovah's Witnesses
  • Aglipay
  • Islam

Our Lady of Angels Parish[edit]

Our Lady of Angels Parish is a member of Roman Catholic Diocese of Lucena.

  • Parish Priest: Rev. Msgr. Melicio Verastigue, P.C., E.V.
  • Parochial Vicar: Rev. Fr. Mishael S. Hernandez
  • Parochial Vicar: Rev. Fr. Virgilio S. Nadres Jr. – (grandson of Orlando Nadres)

Economy[edit]

The economy of Atimonan is sustained by fishing and agriculture. Many also engage in seafaring. The town is part of the Tourism Highway Program of the Department of Tourism.

Tourist attractions[edit]

Festivals[edit]

Tagultol Festival

The Tagultol Festival is an evolution of various cultural activities, practiced in previous years by Atimonanins. The Town & Patronal Fiesta every August 1 & 2 is simply celebrated with the usual parade, a cultural program, thanksgiving mass and procession. In 1981, during the administration of the late Quezon Board Member and former Mayor of Atimonan Remedios V. Diestro, an activity was started – the Karakol. It is a fluvial parade done in the afternoon of the 2nd day of the fiesta. The boats traveled around Lamon Bay within the boundaries of the town proper headed by the Grand Boat where the patron – Nuestra Senora de Los Angeles was aboard. There were singing, dancing & band playing, all in expression of gratitude to the Almighty for the year’s bountiful catch. The parade then joined the religious procession and ended at the church.

Later, it was done in the morning after the thanksgiving mass at the Fishing Port and Boat Racing Competition followed after the Karakol.The creation of the Lupong Tagapangasiwa ng Kultura at Sining sa Atimonan (LUPTAKSA) under the leadership of Mr. Francisco T. Laude, a retired public school teacher, put new dimension and vigor to the town’s cultural awareness and in the year 2003, the Tagultol Festival was finally launched. Tagultol, an old fishing method used by Atimonanins, was derived from the Tagalog word ugtol, meaning bounce. Tagultol fishing consists of a rectangular stone tied at the end of abaca strings dip in honey. Thorns of calamansi & similar plants with bait were tied 2 feet above the stone before dipping in water and moved in a bouncing movements. The festival is a five-day celebration starting July 29 until August 2. The celebration is an array of both cultural and sports activities, talent and beauty contests participated by community organizations and individuals and headed by the local government’s culture and arts council (LUPTAKSA) and Atimonan Tourism Council.

Pabitin Festival

The Town of Atimonan celebrates the Pabitin Festival every May 15 in honor of the patron saint of farmers, St. Isidore, almost the same in Lucban's Pahiyas Festival. During this festival, every house in the town proper has hanging decor such as vegetables, fruits, suman, dried fish wrapped in plastic and any other kinds of food, and when the statue of St. Isidore have passed the street, then the decoration will be thrown in the people who wants to have the decors.

Education[edit]

  • Quezonian Educational College Inc.
  • Our Lady of Angels Academy(OLAA)

Local government[edit]

Municipal officials (2010–2013):

  • Municipal Mayor: Jose F. Mendoza
  • Municipal Vice-Mayor: Joel M. Vergano
  • Municipal Councilors:
    • Zenaida D. Veranga
    • Renato C. Sarmiento
    • Cielyn S. Diestro
    • Elmer M. Santander
    • Maria Aurora A. Tamayo
    • Nestor E. Santander
    • John Francis L. Luzano
    • Roseller A. Magtibay
  • PPLB President: Ernesto S. Amandy
  • PPSK President: Loid John L. Vergaño

Municipal officials (2013-2016):

  • Municipal Mayor: Jose F. Mendoza
  • Municipal Vice-Mayor: Joel M. Vergaño
  • Municipal Councilors:
    • Zenaida D. Veranga
    • Rizaldy L. Velasco
    • Renato C. Sarmiento
    • Elmer M. Santander
    • Iñigo P. Mapaye
    • Cielyn S. Diestro-Makayan
    • Roseller A. Magtibay
    • John Francis L. Luzano
  • PPLB President: Ernesto S. Amandy

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Official City/Municipal 2013 Election Results". Intramuros, Manila, Philippines: Commission on Elections (COMELEC). 11 September 2013. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Province: QUEZON". PSGC Interactive. Makati City, Philippines: National Statistical Coordination Board. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c "Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay: as of May 1, 2010". 2010 Census of Population and Housing. National Statistics Office. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 

External links[edit]