Bonner Springs, Kansas

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Bonner Springs, Kansas
City
Agriculture Hall of Fame, 2009
Agriculture Hall of Fame, 2009
Motto: "Life is better in...Bonner Springs"
Location of Bonner Springs, Kansas
Location of Bonner Springs, Kansas
Coordinates: 39°4′0″N 94°52′45″W / 39.06667°N 94.87917°W / 39.06667; -94.87917Coordinates: 39°4′0″N 94°52′45″W / 39.06667°N 94.87917°W / 39.06667; -94.87917
Country United States
State Kansas
Counties Wyandotte, Johnson, Leavenworth
Trading Post 1812
Incorporated 1898
Area[1]
 • Total 16.09 sq mi (41.67 km2)
 • Land 15.73 sq mi (40.74 km2)
 • Water 0.36 sq mi (0.93 km2)
Elevation 869 ft (265 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 7,314
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 7,419
 • Density 465.0/sq mi (179.5/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 66012
Area code(s) 913
FIPS code 20-07975
GNIS feature ID 0478865[4]
Website BonnerSprings.org

Bonner Springs is a river city in Johnson, Leavenworth, and Wyandotte counties in the State of Kansas. It is part of the Kansas City, Missouri Metropolitan Area. The vast majority of the city, which lies in Wyandotte County, is part of the "Unified Government" which contains Kansas City, Kansas, Bonner Springs, Edwardsville, and roughly a quarter of Lake Quivira. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 7,314.[5]

History[edit]

Bonner Springs was named from a mineral spa said to have medicinal qualities.[6]

Geography[edit]

Bonner Springs is located at 39°04′00″N 94°52′45″W / 39.066707°N 94.879132°W / 39.066707; -94.879132 (39.066707, -94.879132),[7] along both banks of the Kansas River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 16.09 square miles (41.67 km2), of which, 15.73 square miles (40.74 km2) is land and 0.36 square miles (0.93 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 609
1910 1,447 137.6%
1920 1,599 10.5%
1930 1,837 14.9%
1940 1,837 0.0%
1950 2,277 24.0%
1960 3,171 39.3%
1970 3,884 22.5%
1980 6,266 61.3%
1990 6,413 2.3%
2000 6,768 5.5%
2010 7,314 8.1%
Est. 2012 7,419 1.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
2012 Estimate[9]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 7,314 people, 2,810 households, and 1,917 families residing in the city. The population density was 465.0 inhabitants per square mile (179.5 /km2). There were 3,025 housing units at an average density of 192.3 per square mile (74.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 84.8% White, 5.4% African American, 0.9% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 5.0% from other races, and 3.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.8% of the population.

There were 2,810 households of which 35.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.6% were married couples living together, 14.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 31.8% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.11.

The median age in the city was 35.7 years. 26.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.8% were from 25 to 44; 26.2% were from 45 to 64; and 11.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.9% male and 52.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 6,768 people, 2,592 households, and 1,824 families residing in the city. The population density was 429.4 people per square mile (165.8/km2). There were 2,754 housing units at an average density of 174.7 per square mile (67.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.2% White, 4.1% African American, 0.8% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 2.7% from other races, and 1.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.2% of the population. 22.1% were of German, 13.3% American, 12.8% Irish and 10.9% English ancestry.

There were 2,592 households out of which 35.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.5% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.6% were non-families. 24.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.2% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, and 12.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 93.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.2 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the city was $43,234, and the median income for a family was $50,476. Males had a median income of $36,390 versus $26,957 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,730. About 6.8% of families and 9.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.9% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Its high school is Bonner Springs High School.

Cultural institutions[edit]

Bonner Springs contains the Agricultural Center and Hall of Fame, a privately funded charitable institution chartered by the U.S. Congress to "educate society on the historical and present value of American agriculture and to honor leadership in Agri-Business and Academia by providing education, information, experience and recognition."

In addition, the Wyandotte County Museum and Historical Society is located within the Wyandotte County Park, in Bonner Springs. The Museum and Trowbridge Archival Library are open to the public free of charge. Its charge is to preserve and educate the history of Wyandotte County and its people.[citation needed]

Bonner Springs is also home to Sandstone Amphitheater, a popular concert venue. The city is host of the annual Kansas City Renaissance Festival.[10] Each year, during the last weekend of August, the city hosts Tiblow Days, a heritage festival in honor of Henry Tiblow (an early settler).[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2011. 
  6. ^ Blackmar, Frank Wilson (1912). Kansas: A Cyclopedia of State History, Embracing Events, Institutions, Industries, Counties, Cities, Towns, Prominent Persons, Etc.. Standard Publishing Company. p. 205. 
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  8. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved October 24, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Retrieved October 24, 2013. 
  10. ^ Draper, Bill (2003-08-15). "Off with its head?". The Topeka Capital-Journal. Retrieved 2010-02-17. 
  11. ^ Henry Tiblow info

Further reading[edit]

County
  • History of Leavenworth County Kansas; Jesse Hall and LeRoy Hand; Historical Publishing; 684 pages; 1921. (Download 27MB PDF eBook)
Kansas

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Maps