CBS Sports Spectacular

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CBS Sports Spectacular
CBS Sports Spectacular.png
Logo used since 2006[1]
Format Sports anthology program
Created by CBS Sports
Starring See host section
Opening theme See theme music section
Country of origin USA
Broadcast
Original channel CBS
Picture format 480i (SDTV),
1080i (HDTV)
Original run January 3, 1960 – present
External links
Website

CBS Sports Spectacular is a sports anthology program produced by CBS Sports. The series began on January 3, 1960[2] as The CBS Sports Spectacular, and has been known under many different names, including CBS Sports Saturday,[3][4] CBS Sports Sunday,[5] Eye on Sports[6][7] and The CBS Sports Show.[8][9]

The program continues to air on an irregular basis on weekend afternoons, especially during the late spring and summer months. Normally it airs pre-recorded "time-buy" sports events produced by outside companies, such as supercross or skiing competitions, or sponsored documentaries.

Hosts[edit]

Hosts have included John "Bud" Palmer, Jack Whitaker, Brent Musburger, Pat Summerall [10] Jim Kelly,[11] Dick Stockton,[12] Tim Brant,[13] Greg Gumbel, Pat O'Brien, Andrea Joyce and Michele Tafoya.

Under its current format, the program does not have a regular host.

Memorable moments[edit]

Theme music[edit]

An original composition by Edd Kalehoff featuring scat vocals was used as the theme for The CBS Sports Spectacular beginning in 1970.[14] Then, The Electric Light Orchestra's "Fire on High" was used as the theme of the show (when it was known as The CBS Sports Special) from 1976[15] to 1978.[16] The next song used as a theme (from 1979[17]-1980[18]) was an "in-house" version of American composer Aaron Copland's symphonic instrumental "Fanfare For The Common Man."[19] The CBS version of "Fanfare" – clocking in at 1 minute, eight seconds—was styled after the 9 minute, 40 second version recorded by UK progressive rock group Emerson, Lake & Palmer on its 1977 LP, Works Volume 1.

For CBS' Super Bowl XVI coverage at the end of the 1981 NFL season,[20][21] CBS' theme music would eventually become the theme for CBS Sports Saturday/Sunday. The music itself, could be considered a hybrid of the then, NFL Today theme and their original college basketball theme.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Google Search – 2006 (''The CBS Sports Spectacular'')". Google. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Google Search – 1960 (''The CBS Sports Spectacular'')". Google. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Google Search – 1981 (''CBS Sports Saturday'')". Google. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  4. ^ It was CBS Sports Spectacular until 1981, when Terry O'Neil took over as executive producer and changed it to Sports Saturday and Sports Sunday and made it more of a breaking news program. In the late 1970s, Eddie Einhorn ran it with Dick Stockton as host, and it could be very interesting—they often did it as a travelogue built around the events in one location, which meant Stockton almost outdid Jim McKay in the Frequent Flier department. But they had a lot of trash sports, too, and that's what O'Neil tried to get rid of.[dead link]
  5. ^ "Google Search – 1981 (''CBS Sports Sunday'')". Google. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  6. ^ Eye on Sports (1994) home page at InBaseline.com
  7. ^ "Google Search – 1994 (''Eye on Sports'')". Google. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  8. ^ The CBS Sports Show (1995) home page at InBaseline.com
  9. ^ "Google Search – 1995 (''The CBS Sports Show'')". Google. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Brent also hosted "CBS Sports Saturday/Sunday," the U.S. Open Tennis Championships, the National Basketball Association Finals, the Masters Tournament and the Pan American Games". ESPN. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Jim Kelly". GolfPodium.com. Infinity Sports Marketing, Inc. Retrieved 15 May 2012. 
  12. ^ "He worked at CBS from 1978–94, calling NFL games and hosting "CBS Sports Spectacular" until 1980". Tbs.com. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  13. ^ "He served as host of "CBS Sports Saturday," "Winter-Fest," the "NCAA Tournament Selection Show" and the Emmy Award-winning Tour de France coverage, again demonstrating his versatility in play-by-play, expert analysis, reporting and studio hosting". ESPN. December 13, 2002. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  14. ^ "CBS Sports Spectacular". Television Production Music Museum Vault. Retrieved August 6, 2012. 
  15. ^ "Google Search – 1976 (''The CBS Sports Spectacular'')". Google. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  16. ^ "Google Search – 1978 (''The CBS Sports Spectacular'')". Google. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Google Search – 1979 (''The CBS Sports Spectacular'')". Google. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  18. ^ "Google Search – 1980 (''The CBS Sports Spectacular'')". Google. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  19. ^ "CBS Sports Spectacular – 1978". Televisiontunes.com. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  20. ^ "Google Search – 1982 (''CBS Sports Saturday'')". Google. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 
  21. ^ "Google Search – 1982 (''CBS Sports Sunday'')". Google. Retrieved December 12, 2011. 

External links[edit]