College of the Holy Spirit Manila

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College of the Holy Spirit Manila
Motto Truth in Love
Veritas in Caritate (Latin)
earlier Truth and Love
Veritas et Caritas
Established 17 June 1913 (Holy Ghost School)
April 1965 (College of the Holy Spirit Manila)
Type Private Co-Ed College, Roman Catholic, SSpS
President Dr. Felina Co-Young
Location 163 E. Mendiola St., Manila, Philippines
Affiliations Mendiola Consortium, PAASCU, Catholic Educational Association of the Philippines (CEAP), SSpS Educational System
Website Official website

The College of the Holy Spirit Manila, or simply CHSM, is a Catholic educational institution founded and being run by the Missionary Sisters Servants of the Holy Spirit in Manila, Philippines. [1] Founded in 1913, College of the Holy Spirit Manila was established originally as Holy Ghost College through the invitation of then Manila Archbishop Jeremias Harty.[2] Located originally at Legarda Street, the present campus is now located in the historic Mendiola Street, inside the Malacañan Palace Complex. It is one of the schools which comprises the Mendiola Consortium (MC) for academic cooperation along with Centro Escolar University Manila, La Consolacion College Manila, San Beda College Manila, and St. Jude Catholic School.[3]

Known as a girls school in the Philippines, the college broke this long tradition starting in 2005 for the high school department allowing the admission of boys and in 2006 for the college department when the Nursing program decided to accept male students.[4] The college offers academic programs for high school, undegraduate courses, post-graduate degrees and short-term certificate programs. The undergraduate programs includes course in Arts and Education, Business, Fine Arts and Health Sciences. While post-graduate courses includes master's degree in Business Administration, Business Administration for Health Professionals, Tourism and Hospitality Management, Guidance and Counseling, and Special Education. It also offers professional course in Special Education, Caregiver Program and Women Leadership.[5] Starting school year 2013, it also opens two new short courses in Digital Arts and Gerontology.[6]

In 1957, College of the Holy Spirit Manila became one of the founding charter member of the Philippine Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges and Universities (PAASCU) to ensure the quality of education. Since then, the college undergoes voluntary accreditation. And the last March 6–7, 2013 the college was re-accredited.[7] CHSM was granted Level III re-accreditation status for arts, sciences and business programs by PAASCU with five years validity until 2018, which deviates to the normal three-year validity.[6]

As a SSpS school, for 98 years it was administered by SSpS religious sisters. In 11 June 2011, the SSpS Philippines North Provincial Leadership entrusted the administration of the school to its alumna Dr. Felina Co-Young, making her the first lay woman president of the college.[8] The SSpS sisters remains in school as head of different administrative departments and as instructors.

History[edit]

The foundation of the College of the Holy Spirit Manila was through a mistaken response to an anonymous letter with a five-dollar bill. The SSpS sisters in Tayum of the province of Abra, Philippines thought it was from then Manila Archbishop Jeremias Harty, thus, sending a letter of gratitude to the Archbishop. The prelate responded that it was not from him but, pleased with the sisters, he invited them to start a free school for poor street children of Manila.[9] During the period, Archbishop Harty was calling religious orders to establish Catholic schools in Manila to preempt the spread of Protestantism in his archdiocese. Finally, after a year of stay in Tayum, Abra, the pioneer Sisters moved to No. 663 Legarda Street[10] in Manila to establish the Holy Ghost School on 17 June 1913 as a response to the invitation of the Archbishop.[9]

Holy Ghost "Cottage"[edit]

Five SSpS sisters was sent to a small house in Manila to start the second school of the congregation in the Philippines. Sisters Hieronyma, Sebastiana, Ludwiga, Laetitia and Gereona gave the nickname Holy Ghost "Cottage" for their foundation, the Holy Ghost College (HGC).[11] Dubbed by their benefactor Archbishop Harty as "the poorest children of Manila," he donated several furniture for the use of the school.[10]

On the start of the school, it had 23 primary school pupils enrolled in the first semester and during the second semester it grew to 93 students.[11] American Governor-General of the Philippines Francis Burton Harrison through the Division Superintendent of Schools granted Government Recognition and Permit to Operate in 1915.[10] As years go on, the enrollment increased that the Sisters need to rent the neighboring house for them to hold classes. In 1919, there where a total of 274 grade-school pupils.[11]

Mendiola Property[edit]

As the school opened the secondary (high school) department, there was a need for the expansion of the school. Thus, the 12,000-square-meter present campus located on the intersections of E. Mendiola Street, J.P Laurel Street, and C. Aguila Street was bought on 7 July 1920.[11] With the buildings already constructed, the school was moved to the Mendiola Property on 25 March 1922.[12]

In 1924, HGC became the Provincial Motherhouse of the SSpS congregation in the Philippines[12] until it was finally moved in Poinsettia Street, New Manila, Quezon City in 1945.[13]

The first batch of high school students graduated in March 1924.[14] On 2 April 1925, the college department started when it was given government recognition to operate[10] with a two-year course, Associate in Art.[14] In 1928, three Bachelor's Degree programs were offered: Liberal Arts, Preparatory Law, and Education.[15] In 1932, it added BS Home Economics and BA Fine Arts and, in 1936, BS Commerce and the Secretarial Course. Two years later, the Master of Arts in Education was introduced in 1938.[16]

During the Japanese occupation of the Philippines in 1941, the school was interrupted when they have requisitioned some of the buildings. When schooling resumed in 1943, the classes were crammed in the remaining buildings and some neighbor houses.[17] In 1944, Bachelor of Music was offered with various majors through the years: piano, organ, violin, marimba, voice, and others. After the war, new buildings were constructed as student population grew more: Elementary Building (1947), Paraclete Auditorium (1948), Canteen (1949), College Building (1956), College Building-Annex (1961–62), the College Library Annex (1964), New Elementary Building (1966), and the College Cafeteria (1970).[17]

The college department continued to offer new courses. Thus, the five major academic departments were formed in 1951, namely, Liberal Arts Education, Home Economics (later changed to Nutrition and Dietetics), Fine Arts, Commerce, and Science.[15] During the 1950s, maintaining that there was need for a higher level of collegiate excellence than that required by the Bureau of Education, 11 Catholic Educational Association of the Philippines (CEAP) institutions, HGC being one of them, spearheaded a voluntary accreditation.[18] Thus, in 1957, HGC underwent its first survey visit for accreditation and became a charter and founding member of the Philippine Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges and Universities (PAASCU).[19] The Science Department opened three more courses in 1963: BS in Medical Technology, Pre-Nursing, and Pre-Medicine. During the celebration of its Golden Jubilee in 1963, the college made major curricular changes. Some degree programs were phased out while new major fields in the basic programs were introduced.[20]

Organization[edit]

In line with the congregational decision of lay empowerment and consistent with the liberating education thrust of the College of the Holy Spirit, Administration adopted participatory management in 1991. Three clusters (Academic, Internal and External Relations, and Administrative) made up the President's Council of ten (10) members in 1991-94. The reorganization in 1995 increased the participation of middle managers through the academic and non-academic offices/councils. The 16 members of Academic Council was composed of nine (9) area chairpersons and the Dean of Academic Affairs who was ex-officio chair. In 1997, the Non-Academic Council (later named Administrative Council) was organized to serve as a clearing house for the various concerns of the student services and support offices.

Global Studies[edit]

CHSM's network in the global village was initiated in 1989 with the Culture and Language Program of Seirei Women's Junior College, Akita, Japan. In 1995, International Education Specialist, College of the Holy Spirit and the Swiss Association Hotel Management School of Le Roche, Switzerland forged a Memorandum of Agreement "One-Year Study Abroad Program" for BSHRM students. For two successive years, students went to Switzerland (4 in 1995 and 5 in 1996). In 2000, BSHRM students also participated in the Practicum Program in Australia.

In 1998 CHS, Inter-Ed and College of St. La Salle in Montreal agreed to offer a "One-Year Study Abroad Program" for Fine Arts Students of the College of the Holy Spirit. In 1999, the President's Council reviewed the functions and the scope of responsibilities of the Dean of Non-Academic Affairs and decided that the title Dean of Non-Academic Affairs be changed to a more appropriate title—Dean of Administrative Affairs, the functions of which would include student affairs. In 2003-2004, the Board of Trustees approved the re-creation of the Office of the Dean for Student Affairs.

In 2003, practical training of CHS students from different disciplines, HRM, Tourism, International Studies and Communication Arts was facilitated by First Place Inc. Second and Third year students take their summer work and study program in the United States. This was further enhanced by the signing in March 2005 of a Memorandum of Agreement between the CHSM President and the Presidents of four other schools: University of the Philippines (UP), San Sebastian College, St. Paul College and Philippine Women's University (PWU) with the Swiss Education Group for students to undertake training in Montreux Institute, Montreux, Switzerland.

Academic programs[edit]

The college offers the following academic programs:[21]

A.School of Arts and Education

  • Bachelor of Arts major in Communication Arts
  • Bachelor of Arts major in International Studies
  • Bachelor of Science in Psychology
  • Bachelor of Secondary Education major in English
  • Bachelor of Secondary Education major in Religious and Values Education

B.School of Business

  • Bachelor of Science in Business Administration major in Business Management and Entrepreneurship
  • Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management
  • Bachelor of Science in Tourism Management
  • Bachelor of Science in Accountancy

C.School of Fine Arts

  • Bachelor of Fine Arts major in Advertising Design
  • Bachelor of Science in Interior Design

D.School of Health Sciences

  • Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology
  • Bachelor of Science in Nursing
  • Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy
  • Bachelor of Science in Respiratory Therapy

3.GRADUATE SCHOOL

  • Master of Arts in Special Education
  • Master of Business Administration
  • Master of Business Administration for Health Professionals
  • Master of Tourism & Hospitality Management
  • Master of Arts in Guidance and Counseling

4.SHORT COURSES

  • Certificate in Women Leadership
  • Certificate in Caregiver Program

Awards[edit]

The college has received Level III Accreditation, the second highest possible level, from the Philippine Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges, and Universities (PAASCU). It was granted full autonomous status by the Commission on Higher Education of the Philippines in 2003. It received the National Consumers Quality Award as the Top Exclusive Catholic School for Girls in 2003.[21]

Alumnae[edit]

In the mid-1950s, the Alumnae Association was formed which supported the Holy Spirit pre-school in Maria Clara, Sampaloc, Manila, as well as other projects. In the mid-1980s, the outgoing Board of Trustees members of the CHS Alumnae Foundation who have been involved in community service for the resettled urban poor from Smokey Mountain (later relocated to Bulihan), organized the Paraclete Foundation, Inc., now on its 25th year. Alumnae in North America formed themselves into the College of the Holy Spirit North America Foundation (CHSNAF), which endeavours to assist the College to improve its facilities. Basic needs of the less fortunate, especially need for proper housing, has been responded to through Habitat for Humanity and "Gawad Kalinga". The local CHS Alumnae foundation as well as the different batches have always been supportive of the school and have recently launched the "Adopt a Scholar Project"-100 scholars for 100 years.

The college has produced the following alumnae:[22]

  • Evangeline Magaling-Matthews, newspaper columnist (Paralegal's Corner), Asian Journal Publications, Inc., Consumers' Guide Section on Immigration, Los Angeles, California
  • Eugenia Guidote-Puyat - agriculturist, banker, realtor and civic leader
  • Merceditas Navarro-Gutierrez - first female Philippine Ombudsman; former Secretary of Justice
  • Leonida Laki-Vera - former Philippine Ambassador to the Vatican
  • Gabrielle Venus Calizo - Congresswoman of Aklan
  • Teresa Aquino-Oreta - former Senator and Congresswoman of Malabon
  • Mary Jane Ortega - Mayor of San Fernando, La Union
  • Lupita Aquino-Kashiwahara - award winning movie and television director
  • Cristina Ferrer - ABS-CBN Star Magic, Road Manager
  • Josefina Cruz-Natori "Josie Natori" - international fashion designer and entrepreneur
  • Eugenia Duran-Apostol - 2006 Ramon Magsaysay (Asia's version of the Nobel Prize) awardee for journalism and literature
  • Catherine Quimpo-Castañeda - Director, Office of Programs and Standards, Commission on Higher Education of the Philippines
  • Victoria Pineda-Garchitorena - President, Ayala Foundation; former Head of the Presidential Management Staff
  • Ana Marie Arcenas - hygienist, Health Department, Temple University
  • Sally Andal-Muñoz - founding Partner JVS Asia, Inc., distributor of The Body Shop and Marithe and Francois Girbaud, in the Philippines.
  • Ronisia Maquiling-Gosiengfiao - Director, Presidential Management Staff
  • Maria Christina Astorga - Chairperson, Theology Department, Loyola Schools, Ateneo de Manila University
  • Ma. Consoliza Laguardia - Former Chairperson, Movie and Television Rating and Classification Board (MTRCB)
  • Guadalupe Sanchez - 1974 Bb. Pilipinas and former Miss Universe semi-finalist
  • Edna Zapanta-Manlapaz - Chairperson, English Department, Loyola Schools, Ateneo de Manila University
  • Virginia Diaz - Full Professor, De La Salle University-Manila College of Business and Economics
  • Shirley I. Mendoza, Ph.D. - professor and adviser of Students in Free Enterprise, Divine Word College of Calapan
  • Maxelende Ganade musician and composer of Awit sa Bohol the official provincial hymn of the province of Bohol, Philippines
  • Rosalia Mystica Genovova Jones-David - head of the Rose of Bambini Group of Young Women
  • Sheila S. Coronel-2003 Ramon Magsaysay (Asia's version of the Nobel Prize) awardee for journalism and literature. Executive Director at Toni Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism, Columbia University
  • Alma Angeles - Net 25 Newscaster

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.holyspirit.edu.ph/index.php?id=22&mt=1.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. ^ http://www.holyspirit.edu.ph/index.php?id=28&mt=2.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ http://www.ceu.edu.ph/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=399:mendiola-consortium-inaugurates-peace-arch&catid=42:ceu-manila-news&Itemid=119.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. ^ Student's handbook. Manila: College of the Holy Spirit Manila. 2012. p. 6. 
  5. ^ Student's Manual. Manila: College of the Holy Spirit Manila. 2012. pp. 18–19. 
  6. ^ a b Young, Felina (June 10, 2013). "CHSM marks 100th". Inquirer. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
  7. ^ "COLLEGE OF THE HOLY SPIRIT MANILA SUCCESSFULLY EARNS 5-YEAR PAASCU RE-ACCREDITATION". May 29, 2013. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  8. ^ Quismundo, Tarra (July 17, 2011). "This time, president wore graduation cap, lipstick". Inquirer. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b Gamboa, Coylee (2011). Led by the Spirit, SSpS Philippines: A Journey of a Hundred Years 1912-2012. Quezon City, Philippines: SSpS Rosary Province. p. 40. 
  10. ^ a b c d HGC/CHS: Through 75 Years, 1913-1988. Manila: College of the Holy Spirit Manila Alumnae Foundation, Inc. 1988. p. 17. 
  11. ^ a b c d Gamboa, Coylee (2011). Led by the Spirit, SSpS Philippines: A Journey of a Hundred Years 1912-2012. Quezon City, Philippines: SSpS Rosary Province. p. 43. 
  12. ^ a b Gamboa, Coylee (2011). Led by the Spirit, SSpS Philippines: A Journey of a Hundred Years 1912-2012. Quezon City, Philippines: SSpS Rosary Province. p. 45. 
  13. ^ Gamboa, Coylee (2011). Led by the Spirit, SSpS Philippines: A Journey of a Hundred Years 1912-2012. Quezon City, Philippines: SSpS Rosary Province. p. 42. 
  14. ^ a b Gamboa, Coylee (2011). Led by the Spirit, SSpS Philippines: A Journey of a Hundred Years 1912-2012. Quezon City, Philippines: SSpS Rosary Province. p. 46. 
  15. ^ a b Student's handbook. Manila: College of the Holy Spirit Manila. 2012. p. 2. 
  16. ^ Gamboa, Coylee (2011). Led by the Spirit, SSpS Philippines: A Journey of a Hundred Years 1912-2012. Quezon City, Philippines: SSpS Rosary Province. pp. 46–47. 
  17. ^ a b Gamboa, Coylee (2011). Led by the Spirit, SSpS Philippines: A Journey of a Hundred Years 1912-2012. Quezon City, Philippines: SSpS Rosary Province. p. 47. 
  18. ^ Gamboa, Coylee (2011). Led by the Spirit, SSpS Philippines: A Journey of a Hundred Years 1912-2012. Quezon City, Philippines: SSpS Rosary Province. p. 48. 
  19. ^ Student's handbook. Manila: College of the Holy Spirit Manila. 2012. pp. 2–3. 
  20. ^ Student's handbook. Manila: College of the Holy Spirit Manila. 2012. p. 3. 
  21. ^ a b Official prospectus, College of the Holy Spirit, 2006.
  22. ^ Alumni list, College of the Holy Spirit, 2006.
  • 2011 CHSM College Student Handbook

External links[edit]