Earl of Kingston

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For the title in the peerage of England, see Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull.
Mitchelstown Castle, County Cork, the former seat of the King family.

Earl of Kingston is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1768 for Edward King, 1st Viscount Kingston. The Earl holds the subsidiary titles Baron Kingston, of Rockingham in the County of Roscommon (created in 1764), Viscount Kingston, of Kingsborough in the County of Sligo (created in 1766), Baron Erris, of Boyle in the County of Roscommon (created in 1801), and Viscount Lorton, of Boyle in the County of Roscommon (created in 1806), also in the Peerage of Ireland. He is also a baronet in the Baronetage of Ireland. Between 1821 and 1869 the Earls also held the title Baron Kingston, of Mitchelstown in the County of Cork (created in 1821), in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.

Family history until 1755[edit]

The King family descends from Robert King, younger brother of John King, 1st Baron Kingston (a title which became extinct in 1761; see Baron Kingston). In 1682 Robert King was created a Baronet, of Boyle Abbey in the County of Roscommon. He subsequently represented County Roscommon and Boyle in the Irish House of Commons.[1] He was succeeded by his son, John, the second Baronet, who also represented County Roscommon and Boyle in the Irish Parliament.[2] John died childless and was succeeded by his younger brother, Henry, the third Baronet, who like his father and brother represented County Roscommon and Boyle in Parliament.[3] Henry was succeeded by his eldest son, Robert, the fourth Baronet, who sat as Member of Parliament for Boyle.[4] In 1748, aged 24, Robert was created Baron Kingsborough in the Peerage of Ireland.[5] However, he died unmarried only seven years later when the barony became extinct.[4]

Family history 1755–1869[edit]

Lord Kingsborough was succeeded in the baronetcy by his younger brother, Edward, the fifth Baronet, who represented Boyle and County Sligo in the Irish Parliament. In 1764 Edward was raised to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Kingston, of Rockingham in the County of Roscommon, a revival of the barony held by his kinsmen which had become extinct three years earlier. He was further honoured when he was made Viscount Kingston, of Kingsborough in the County of Sligo, in 1766, and Earl of Kingston in 1768, also in the Peerage of Ireland.[6] He was succeeded by his son, Robert, the second Earl, who represented County Cork in the Irish House of Commons.[7] He married his kinswoman, the heiress Caroline Fitzgerald (d. 1823), daughter of Richard FitzGerald by the Honourable Margaret King, daughter of James King, 4th Baron King (of the first creation). Some detail is known about the lives of the second Earl and his wife, as they hired the pioneer educator and proto-feminist Mary Wollstonecraft as governess to their daughters. Her books Thoughts on the Education of Daughters and Original Stories from Real Life draw on her experiences under their roof at Mitchelstown Castle. The daughter she influenced the most was Margaret King, who, as Lady Mount Cashell, undertook a Grand Tour on the Continent, accompanied by her friend Catherine Wilmot, whose diaries were eventually published as An Irish Peer on the Continent, 1801-03 (1920).[citation needed]

The second Earl was succeeded by his eldest son, George, the third Earl, who represented County Roscommon in the Irish Parliament and later sat in the British House of Lords as an Irish Representative peer.[8] In 1821 he was created Baron Kingston, of Mitchelstown in the County of Cork, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom,[9] which gave him and his descendants an automatic seat in the House of Lords. His eldest son, Edward, Viscount Kingsborough, was an antiquarian and also represented County Cork in the British Parliament. Lord Kingsborough predeceased his father, unmarried,[10] and the earldom devolved on his younger brother, Robert, the fourth Earl. Robert sat as Member of Parliament for County Cork but was later declared to be of an "unsound mind".[11] He died unmarried and was succeeded by his younger brother, James, the fifth Earl, who died childless in 1869, when the barony of kingston created in 1821 became extinct.[12]

Family history, 1869-present[edit]

The fifth Earl was succeeded in the remaining titles by his first cousin, Robert King, 2nd Viscount Lorton, who became the sixth Earl.[13] Robert was the son of General the Honourable Robert King, fourth son of the second Earl, who had been created Viscount Lorton in the Peerage of Ireland in 1806 (see Viscount Lorton for earlier history of this branch of the family).[14] Robert, the sixth Earl, had previously represented County Roscommon in Parliament. He died in October 1869, only a month after succeeded in the earldom,[13] and was succeeded by his elder son, Robert, the seventh Earl, who died two years later at the age of forty, without any male issue.[15] The seventh Earl was succeeded by his younger brother, Henry, the eighth Earl, who was Lord-Lieutenant of County Roscommon and sat in the House of Lords as an Irish Representative peer. Henry married Frances Margaret Christina King-Tenison, daughter of Edward King-Tenison, of Kilronan Castle, County Roscommon, and assumed in 1883 by Royal license the additional surname of Tenison.[16] He was succeeded by his second but only surviving son, Henry, the ninth Earl, who fought in both the Second Boer War and the First World War and sat in the House of Lords as an Irish Representative peer.[17] As of 2012 the titles are held by the ninth Earl's great-grandson, Robert, the twelfth Earl, who succeeded in 2002, the titles having descended from father to son.[18] As of 31 July 2012, the twelfth Earl has not successfully proven his succession to the baronetcy and is therefore not on the Official Roll of the Baronetage. The baronetcy is considered dormant.[19]

Other family members[edit]

Several other members of the King family may also be mentioned. The Honourable Sir Henry King, fourth son of the second Earl, was a politician and soldier.[20] The Honourable James William King, younger son of the second Earl, was a Rear-Admiral in the Royal Navy.[21] George King, son of Reverend the Honourable Richard FitzGerald King, younger son of the second Earl, was a Major-General in the British Army.[22] The Honourable Laurence Harman King-Harman, younger son of the first Viscount Lorton, was the father of 1) Edward King-Harman, a politician (see also Stafford-King-Harman baronets),[23] and 2) Sir Charles King-Harman, High Commissioner to Cyprus.[24]

Seats[edit]

The former seat of the King family was Mitchelstown Castle in Mitchelstown, County Cork. They also owned Kilronan Castle in north County Roscommon. Kilronan, now a luxury hotel, is very near the village of Ballyfarnon in County Roscommon.

King baronets, of Boyle Abbey (1682)[edit]

Barons Kingsborough (1748)[edit]

King baronets, of Boyle Abbey (1682; Reverted)[edit]

Earls of Kingston (1768)[edit]

The heir apparent is the present holder's son Charles Avery Edward King-Tenison, Viscount Kingsborough (born 2000).

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11751 § 117505 Sir Robert King, 1st Bt". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  2. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11751 § 117510 Sir John King, 2nd Bt.". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  3. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 3361 § 33610 Sir Henry King, 3rd Bt.". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  4. ^ a b Lundy, Darryl. "p. 3362 § 33611 Robert King, 1st and last Baron Kingsborough". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  5. ^ The London Gazette: no. 8749. p. 1. 28 May 1748.
  6. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 1280 § 12798 Edward King, 1st Earl of Kingston". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  7. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11741 § 117402 Robert King, 2nd Earl of Kingston". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  8. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11744 § 117432 George King, 3rd Earl of Kingston". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  9. ^ The London Gazette: no. 17724. p. 1461. 14 July 1821.
  10. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11744 § 117438 Edward King, Viscount Kingsborough". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  11. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11744 § 117439 Robert Henry King, 4th Earl of Kingston". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  12. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11744 § 117440 James King, 5th Earl of Kingston". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  13. ^ a b Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11745 § 117446 Robert King, 6th Earl of Kingston". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  14. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 1280 § 12800 General Robert Edward King, 1st Viscount Lorton of Boyle". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  15. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 3508 § 35077 Robert Edward King, 7th Earl of Kingston". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  16. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11746 § 117451 Lt.-Col. Henry Newcomen King-Tenison, 8th Earl of Kingston". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  17. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11746 § 117454 Henry Edwyn King-Tenison, 9th Earl of Kingston". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  18. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11748 § 117478 Robert Charles Henry King-Tenison, 12th Earl of Kingston". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  19. ^ succession-to-baronetcy.
  20. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11759 § 117590 Lt.-Col. Hon. Sir Henry King". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  21. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11781 § 117808 Rear-Admiral Hon. James William King". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  22. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11780 § 117793 Maj.-Gen. George King". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  23. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11752 § 117518 Rt. Hon. Edward Robert King-Harman". The Peerage. [unreliable source]
  24. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "p. 11756 § 117554 Sir Charles Anthony King-Harman". The Peerage. [unreliable source]

References[edit]

  • Kidd, Charles, Williamson, David (editors). Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage (1990 edition). New York: St Martin's Press, 1990,[page needed]
  • Rebel Daughters: Ireland in conflict 1798 (2003) by Janet Todd

External links[edit]