Hollenhorst plaque

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Hollenhorst plaque
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 H34.2
ICD-9 362.33
DiseasesDB 31269

A Hollenhorst plaque AKA "Eickenhorst plaque" is a cholesterol embolus that is seen in a blood vessel of the retina.

Clinical significance[edit]

It is usually seen when a physician performs ophthalmoscopy, during which a plaque will appear bright, refractile, and yellow. It is caused by an embolus lodged within the retinal vessel that originated from an atheromatous plaque in a more proximal (upstream) vessel, usually the internal carotid artery. It is often an indication of a previous ischemic episode in the eye and is a sign of severe atherosclerosis. The most important step in management is to identify and treat the originating plaque to prevent further embolization.

Eponym[edit]

The phenomenon is named after the American ophthalmologist Dr. Robert Hollenhorst (1913–2008) who first described their significance in 1961.[1]N

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hollenhorst RW (1961). "Significance of bright plaques in the retinal arterioles". Jama 1961 178: 23–29. PMID 13908419. 

External links[edit]