Interstate 410

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Interstate 410 marker

Interstate 410
Connally Loop
Route information
Maintained by TxDOT
Length: 49.49 mi[2] (79.65 km)
Existed: 1959[1] – present
Major junctions
Beltway around San Antonio
  I-10
US 87
US 90
US 281
I-35
I-37
Highway system
I-345 I-610

Interstate 410 (abbreviated I-410, and colloquially called Loop 410) is a loop route of Interstate 10 around San Antonio, Texas. It is identified as Connally Loop in honor of former Texas governor John Connally. The north and west section is undergoing a major expansion from six to ten lanes (five in each direction) from Culebra Road to the I-35 interchange as well as major interchanges being renovated at Bandera Road, I-10 and San Pedro Avenue, and an interchange recently constructed at US 281 near San Antonio International Airport.

Route description[edit]

410 near the 410/281 Interchange in Uptown San Antonio
I-410's interchange with I-37 on the southeast side of San Antonio.

Interstate 410 circumnavigates the city of San Antonio, officially beginning and ending at the junction with Interstate 35 on the southwest side of the loop. There are vast differences between the northern arc and southern arc of the loop. The northern arc serves the heavily urbanized portions of San Antonio and is currently being upgraded to as many as five lanes in each direction. The southern arc resembles more of a rural interstate as it transverses for the most part undeveloped portions of San Antonio as a two lane interstate. I-410 intersects I-10 twice, I-35 twice, I-37 once, as well as U.S. Highway 90, US 281, and State Highway 151, all freeways in the San Antonio metro area with the exception of 1604, which forms a secondary loop around the city. I-410 serves San Antonio International Airport, Lackland AFB, Fort Sam Houston, South Texas Medical Center, Southwest Research Institute, and Toyota Motor Manufacturing Texas.[3]

History[edit]

Like most cities in Texas, San Antonio was served by a loop around the city long before the arrival of the Interstate Highway System. Loop 13, although not a freeway, served in this role up until the 1950s, when many of San Antonio's freeways were constructed. The northern half of Loop 13 followed the current path of I-410 while the southern half still exists on the south side of San Antonio. Much of the freeway was proposed during the mid-1950s with construction beginning on the northwest portion of the loop near I-10. In 1960, Loop 13 from I-10 to I-35 was redesignated as Loop 410 for continuity purposes. By 1961 the freeway had been completed from I-35 on the southwest side to just east of US 281 near the airport where it continued on to the east as a 4-lane highway to I-35. By 1964 the southern arc had been extended eastward from I-35 to Roosevelt Avenue and was under construction from Roosevelt to I-35 on the east side of the city. By 1967 the eastern arc had been completed to Interstate Highway standards and the remaining portion from US 281 to I-35 on the cities north side had been completely upgraded to Interstate Highway standards, but still carried the State Loop 410 designation until 1969 when it officially became Interstate 410.[1]

Due to the city growing primarily to the north, I-410 required upgrading along this stretch. It was expanded to six lanes in the late 1970s and early 1980s from Ingram Road to I-35 North. It was further expanded to six lanes from Ingram to Valley Hi Road in 1987. An additional westbound lane was added from I-10 West to Babcock Road in 1996.

I-410 was widened from the late 1990s through early 2010s along its entire northern arc from Culebra road to Austin Highway, with five lanes each way and intersection upgrades at I-10 and San Pedro, and an entire new interchange at US 281,[4][5] officially called the "San Antonio Web".[6]

Exit list[edit]

Exit numbers correspond to mileage from the south junction with I-35.[3] The entire highway is in Bexar County.

Location Mile km Exit Destinations Notes
San Antonio 1 Frontage Road
2 FM 2536 (Old Pearsall Road)
3A Ray Ellison Drive Signed as exit 3 northbound
3B Medina Base Road Northbound exit is via exit 3
4 Valley Hi Drive – Lackland AFB
6 US 90 (Cleto Rodriguez Freeway) – San Antonio, Del Rio
7 Marbach Road
8 Lakeside Parkway Southbound exit and entrance
9A SH 151 (Stotzer Freeway) – SeaWorld Signed as exit 9 northbound
9B West Military Drive Southbound exit and northbound entrance
10 FM 3487 (Culebra Road)
11 Ingram Road
12 Exchange Parkway Southbound exit and entrance
13A SH 16 north / Spur 421 (Bandera Road) – Leon Valley, San Antonio North end of SH 16 concurrency
13B Evers Road Westbound exit and eastbound entrance
14A Summit Parkway Westbound exit and entrance
14B Callaghan Road Signed as exit 14 eastbound
14C Babcock Road Eastbound exit is via exit 14
15 Loop 345 (Fredericksburg Road) – Balcones Heights
16 I-10 / US 87 (McDermott Freeway) – San Antonio, El Paso
17A Cherry Ridge Drive Eastbound exit and westbound entrance, westbound exit is via exit 17
17B Vance Jackson Road Signed as exit 17 westbound
Castle Hills 18 Jackson-Keller Road, West Avenue
19A Honeysuckle Lane Eastbound exit is via exit 18
19B FM 1535 (Military Highway) – Castle Hills Signed as exit 19 eastbound
19 FM 2696 (Blanco Road) Westbound exit is via exit 20A
San Antonio 20A Spur 537 north (San Pedro Avenue) Signed as exit 20 eastbound
20B McCullough Avenue Eastbound exit is via exit 20
21A US 281 (McAlister Freeway) – Johnson City, Downtown "San Antonio Web", fully opened June 9, 2008[5]
21 Airport Boulevard, Wetmore Road – Int'l Airport Signed as exit 21B eastbound
22 Broadway No eastbound entrance
23 Nacogdoches Road No westbound entrance, westbound exit is via exit 24
24 Harry Wurzbach Road – Fort Sam Houston
25A Starcrest Drive Signed as exit 25 eastbound
25B FM 2252 (Perrin-Beitel Road) Eastbound exit is via exit 25
26A Loop 368 south – Alamo Heights Signed as exit 26 westbound
26B Interchange Parkway, Perrin Creek Drive Eastbound exit and westbound entrance
27 I-35 north (Pan Am Expressway) – Austin North end of I-35 concurrency; signed as exit 166 northbound; freeway assumes I-35's exit numbers
166A Randolph Boulevard – Windcrest Northbound exit and westbound entrance
165 FM 1976 (Walzem Road)
164B Eisenhauer Road
164A Rittiman Road
163 I-35 south (Pan Am Expressway) – Downtown South end of I-35 concurrency; southbound exit and northbound entrance
30 Space Center Drive Northbound exit and entrance
30 Binz-Engleman Road Southbound exit and northbound entrance
31A FM 78 – Kirby Signed as exit 32 northbound
31 I-35 south (Pan Am Expressway) / Binz-Engleman Road – San Antonio Northbound left exit and southbound entrance
31B Loop 13 (W.W. White Road) No northbound exit
32 Dietrich Road Southbound exit only
33 I-10 (Lopez Freeway) / US 90 / SH 130 north – Downtown San Antonio, Houston North end of SH 130 concurrency
34 FM 1346 (East Houston Street)
35 US 87 (Rigsby Avenue) – Victoria, La Vernia
37 Southcross Boulevard/New Sulphur Springs Road, Sinclair Road
39 Spur 117 (W.W. White Road)
41 I-37 / US 281 north (Adams Freeway) – San Antonio, Corpus Christi East end of US 281 concurrency
42 Spur 122 (South Presa Street) / Southton Road
43 Espada Road – San Antonio Missions National Historical Park Westbound exit is via exit 44
44 US 281 south / Spur 536 (Roosevelt Avenue) – Pleasanton West end of US 281 concurrency
46 Moursund Boulevard
47 Turnaround East exit and west entrance
48 Zarzamora Street
49 SH 16 south (Palo Alto Road) / Spur 422 (Poteet-Jourdanton Freeway) – Poteet East end of SH 16 concurrency
51 FM 2790 (Somerset Road)
53 I-35 (Pan Am Expressway) – San Antonio, Laredo South end of SH 130 concurrency
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing

  1. ^ a b Transportation Planning and Programming Division. "Interstate Highway No. 410". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2008-02-26. 
  2. ^ Federal Highway Administration. "Route Log - Auxiliary Routes of the Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways - Table 2". Retrieved 2008-02-26. 
  3. ^ a b Google Inc. "overview map of I-410". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&hl=en&geocode=2355175623909919017,29.316846,-98.608354%3B6009444865328575504,29.316841,-98.608338&saddr=I-410+W+%4029.316846,+-98.608354&daddr=29.5185,-98.414154+to:I-410+W+%4029.316841,+-98.608338&mra=dpe&mrcr=0&mrsp=1&sz=10&via=1&sll=29.386962,-98.981323&sspn=0.686836,1.505127&ie=UTF8&ll=29.419862,-98.497925&spn=0.343308,0.752563&z=11. Retrieved 2008-02-24.
  4. ^ Driscoll, Patrick (2007-06-19). "Decades in waiting, ramp open". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved 2008-02-26. [dead link]
  5. ^ a b Driscoll, Patrick (2008-06-10). "U.S. 281/Loop 410 interchange ramps are complete". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved 2008-06-20. [dead link]
  6. ^ Driscoll, Patrick (2006-01-16). "Now there's a name for it". San Antonio Express-News. Archived from the original on 2008-02-23. Retrieved 2008-06-20. [dead link]