Jo Durie

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Jo Durie
Jo Durie doubles Wimbledon 2004.jpg
Durie playing in the Ladies' Invitation Doubles final at Wimbledon in 2004
Country United Kingdom Great Britain
Residence London, United Kingdom
Born (1960-07-27) 27 July 1960 (age 54)
Bristol, United Kingdom
Height 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Turned pro 1977
Retired 1995
Plays Right-handed (one-handed backhand)
Prize money $1,224,016
Singles
Career record 321–305
Career titles 2
Highest ranking No. 5 (9 July 1984)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open QF (1983)
French Open SF (1983)
Wimbledon QF (1984)
US Open SF (1983)
Other tournaments
Tour Finals 1R (1984)
Doubles
Career record 274–199
Career titles 5
Highest ranking No. 9 (December 1983)[1]
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open SF (1985)
French Open SF (1983)
Wimbledon SF (1983, 1984)
US Open QF (1987, 1991)
Other doubles tournaments
Tour Finals F (1984)
Mixed doubles
Career titles 2
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Australian Open W (1991)
Wimbledon W (1987)
US Open SF (1991)
Team competitions
Fed Cup F (1981)

Jo Durie (born Joanna Mary Durie; 27 July 1960, in Bristol, United Kingdom) is a former singles World No. 5 professional tennis player from the United Kingdom. During her career, she also reached No. 9 in the world in doubles, and won two Grand Slam titles, both in the mixed doubles with Jeremy Bates.

Singles career[edit]

After a successful junior career which included winning junior British titles on all three surfaces (grass, hard court and indoor) in 1976; Jo Durie turned professional in 1977, and played her first match at Wimbledon that year against the eventual champion Virginia Wade. In 1980 Durie suffered a major back injury which kept her out of the game for eight months. However she made a successful return to the woman's tennis circuit in 1981, reaching the 4th round of the singles at Wimbledon and the US Open and climbing to her highest singles ranking so far of 31.[2]

1983 proved to be her most successful year as a singles player, ending the season at number 6 in the world rankings and on the prize money leader board. As an unseeded player Durie reached the semi-finals of the French Open, beating both Pam Shriver and Tracy Austin along the way. Later that year she made another Grand Slam singles semi-final appearance at the US Open, where she eventually lost to Chris Evert in straight sets. Her dramatic rise up the singles rankings that year ended with a quarterfinal at the Australian Open in december. Durie's success as a singles player during 1983 gained her a coveted place at the 1984 WTA Tour Championship as the 5th seed.

Her most successful year at Wimbledon as a singles player came in 1984 when she reached the quarter-finals, beating a 15-year old Steffi Graf in a memorable fourth round match. It was just after Wimbledon in 1984 that she reached a career high singles ranking of World No. 5.

She won two top-level WTA singles titles (both in 1983) at Mahwah, New Jersey and Sydney, and had career wins over Steffi Graf, Zina Garrison, Pam Shriver, Hana Mandlíková, and Tracy Austin. Further back injuries in 1989 led to a remodeling of her service action. Durie made her last appearance in a WTA tour singles final at the Virginia Slims of Newport tournament in 1990. In 1991 at the age of 30, and one of the oldest singles competitors that year, she had another successful run to the 4th round of the US Open.

She was ranked the No. 1 British player for most of her career. She won the British National Singles title a record seven times. She was the second British woman player after Virginia Wade to win $1 million in prize money.

Doubles career[edit]

Partnering her fellow British player Jeremy Bates, Durie won the mixed doubles title at Wimbledon in 1987, the first British doubles team to win the title for fifty-one years. In 1991 they became the first British doubles team ever to win the Australian Open mixed doubles title. As of 2013 both of these records still stand. As a team Bates and Durie reached an additional three mixed doubles quarter-finals at Wimbledon in 1986, 1990 and 1993. They also reached the quarter-finals of the Australian Open in 1992 as defending champions.

Durie would go on to win five woman's doubles titles from eighteen finals during her career. Her most successful year as a doubles player, aside from the Grand Slams in 1987 and 1991 was in 1983, when she reached six finals, winning three titles. Durie also reached the semi finals of the women's doubles at the French Open and Wimbledon. By virtue of this success she gained a place at the 1984 WTA Tour Championship in doubles, and reached the final partnering Ann Kiyomura.

Durie won the British National Doubles title a record nine times.

Team Tennis[edit]

Durie was a stalwart member of the British Wightman Cup (1979, 1981–89), British Federation Cup (1981–95) and British European Cup teams (1989–92). Durie was the youngest member of the British Federation Cup team, alongside Virginia Wade and Sue Barker, which reached the team final in 1981. Durie led the British team to victory in the European Championship in Prague in 1992.

Retirement[edit]

Durie retired from competitive tennis at the Wimbledon Championships in 1995, (her eighteenth appearance at the Championships), and marked it with a memorable performance. After three successive operations on her left knee, Durie went into the Championships ranked 326 in the world; yet reached the second round of the ladies singles. She beat France's Alexia Dechaume-Balleret, ranked 85 in the world in straight sets in the first round. Her second round, and last singles match at Wimbledon was against Jana Novotná. After losing the match 6–2 6–2 Jo Durie was given a full standing ovation by the crowd on the 'old' No. 1 Court. Her last match at Wimbledon was appropriately a mixed doubles match on Centre Court, where she played alongside her long standing partner Jeremy Bates.

She is one of very few players to have a winning record against Steffi Graf and leads 4–3 in head-to-heads. Note, however, that all of her wins against Graf were before or during 1985, when Graf was typically a much lower-ranked player during the initial stages of her career.

After retiring from the professional tour, Durie has worked as a TV tennis commentator for both the BBC and British Eurosport. She used to coach British number one Elena Baltacha alongside her own former coach Alan Jones. She won back to back Wimbledon Ladies Senior Invitation doubles titles in 1996 and 1997.

Durie currently works as an academy coach at the FC** Academy in Middlesex.

Major finals[edit]

Grand Slam finals[edit]

Mixed doubles: 2 finals (2 titles, 0 runner–ups)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1987 Wimbledon Grass United Kingdom Jeremy Bates Australia Nicole Provis
Australia Darren Cahill
7–6(10), 6–3
Winner 1991 Australian Open Hard United Kingdom Jeremy Bates United States Robin White
United States Scott Davis
2–6, 6–4, 6–4

Year-End Championships finals[edit]

Doubles: 1 final (0 titles, 1 runner–up)[edit]

Outcome Year Location Surface Partner Opponents Score
Runner-up 1984 New York City Carpet (I) United States Ann Kiyomura United States Martina Navratilova
United States Pam Shriver
6–3, 6–1

WTA Career Finals[edit]

Singles: 6 (2–4)[edit]

Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
WTA Tour Championships (0–0)
Tier I (0–0)
Tier II (0–0)
Tier III (0–1)
Tier IV (0–0)
Tier V (0–0)
Virginia Slims, Avon, Other (2–3)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Runner-up 1. 2 June 1980 United Kingdom Beckenham Grass United States Andrea Jaeger 4–6, 1–6
Runner-up 2. 22 February 1982 United States Greenville Hard (I) Brazil Claudia Monteiro 4–6, 6–3, 4–6
Winner 1. 22 August 1983 United States Mahwah Hard Czechoslovakia Hana Mandlíková 2–6, 7–5, 6–4
Runner-up 3. 17 October 1983 United States Brighton Carpet (I) United States Chris Evert-Lloyd 1–6, 1–6
Winner 2. 21 November 1983 Australia Sydney Grass United States Kathy Jordan 6–3, 7–5
Runner-up 4. 16 July 1990 United States Newport Grass Spain Arantxa Sánchez Vicario 6–7(2), 6–4, 5–7

Doubles: 18 (5–13)[edit]

Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
WTA Tour Championships (0–1)
Tier I (0–0)
Tier II (0–3)
Tier III (0–1)
Tier IV (1–0)
Tier V (0–1)
Virginia Slims, Avon, Other (4–7)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponent Score
Runner-up 1. 2 June 1979 United Kingdom Beckenham Grass United Kingdom Debbie Jevans Australia Elizabeth Little
Australia Kerryn Pratt
1–6, 4–6
Winner 1. 7 June 1982 United Kingdom Birmingham Grass United Kingdom Anne Hobbs United States Rosie Casals
Australia Wendy Turnbull
6–3, 6–2
Runner-up 2. 10 January 1983 United States Houston Carpet (I) United States Barbara Potter United States Martina Navratilova
United States Pam Shriver
4–6, 3–6
Winner 2. 14 March 1983 United States Boston Carpet (I) United States Ann Kiyomura United States Kathy Jordan
United States Anne Smith
6–3, 6–1
Winner 3. 16 May 1983 West Germany Berlin Clay United States Anne Hobbs West Germany Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
West Germany Eva Pfaff
6–4, 7–6
Runner-up 3. 13 June 1983 United Kingdom Eastbourne Grass United Kingdom Anne Hobbs United States Martina Navratilova
United States Pam Shriver
1–6, 0–6
Winner 4. 22 August 1983 United States Mahwah Hard United States Sharon Walsh South Africa Rosalyn Fairbank
United States Candy Reynolds
4–6, 7–5, 6–3
Runner-up 4. 17 October 1983 United Kingdom Brighton Carpet (I) United States Ann Kiyomura United States Chris Evert-Lloyd
United States Pam Shriver
5–7, 4–6
Runner-up 5. 20 February 1984 United States Livingston Carpet (I) United States Ann Kiyomura United States Martina Navratilova
United States Pam Shriver
4–6, 3–6
Runner-up 6. 27 February 1984 United States Virginia Slims Championships Carpet (I) United States Ann Kiyomura United States Martina Navratilova
United States Pam Shriver
3–6, 1–6
Runner-up 7. 18 June 1984 United Kingdom Eastbourne Grass United States Ann Kiyomura United States Martina Navratilova
United States Pam Shriver
4–6, 2–6
Runner-up 8. 13 August 1984 United States Mahwah Hard United States Ann Kiyomura United States Martina Navratilova
United States Pam Shriver
6–7(3), 6–3, 2–6
Runner-up 9. 13 March 1989 United States Boca Raton Hard United States Mary Joe Fernández Czechoslovakia Jana Novotná
Czechoslovakia Helena Suková
4–6, 2–6
Winner 5. 16 April 1990 Singapore Singapore Hard Canada Jill Hetherington France Pascale Paradis
France Catherine Suire
6–4, 6–1
Runner-up 10. 24 September 1990 Germany Leipzig Carpet (I) Netherlands Manon Bollegraf South Africa Lise Gregory
United States Gretchen Magers
2–6, 6–4, 3–6
Runner-up 11. 22 October 1990 United Kingdom Brighton Carpet (I) Soviet Union Natasha Zvereva Czechoslovakia Helena Suková
France Nathalie Tauziat
1–6, 4–6
Runner-up 12. 23 September 1991 Soviet Union St. Petersburg Carpet (I) France Isabelle Demongeot Soviet Union Elena Brioukhovets
Soviet Union Natalia Medvedeva
5–7, 3–6
Runner-up 13. 2 February 1993 France Paris Carpet (I) France Catherine Suire Czech Republic Jana Novotná
Czech Republic Andrea Strnadová
6–7(2), 2–6

Grand Slam performance timeline[edit]

Singles[edit]

Tournament 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 Career SR
Australian Open A A A A A 3R 3R QF 2R 3R NH 4R 2R 3R 2R 2R 2R A A A 0 / 11
French Open A A A 1R 1R 2R SF 2R 1R 1R 1R 2R 1R A 1R 3R A A A 0 / 12
Wimbledon 1R 1R 2R 1R 4R 1R 3R QF 4R 3R 3R 2R A 1R 2R 1R 1R 1R 2R 0 / 18
US Open A A A A 4R 3R SF 1R 1R 3R 2R 1R 1R 1R 4R 1R 1R A A 0 / 13
Career Statistics
Year End Ranking 123 73 53 31 28 6 24 26 24 73 60 118 64 60 60 192 343 292

Doubles[edit]

Tournament 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 Career SR
Australian Open A A A A A 2R 2R QF 2R SF NH QF 1R QF 1R 1R 2R A A A 0 / 11
French Open A A A 1R 3R 3R SF 3R A 2R A A 2R A A A A A A 0 / 7
Wimbledon 1R A 3R 1R 1R 2R SF SF QF 1R 1R 3R A 2R 1R 2R 2R 1R 2R 0 / 17
US Open A A 2R A 3R 2R 2R 3R 2R 1R QF 2R 2R 1R QF 2R 2R A A 0 / 14
Career Statistics
Year End Ranking 10 25 42 43 43 36 39 70 84 51 215 186

Mixed Doubles[edit]

Tournament 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 Career SR
Australian Open A A A A A A A A A A NH A A A SF W QF A A A 1 / 3
French Open A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A 0 / 0
Wimbledon 1R 1R A 2R 3R 2R 3R A QF QF W 2R A QF 3R 3R QF 2R 2R 1 / 16
US Open A A A A A A A A A A A A 1R A SF 1R A A A 0 / 3
  • NH = tournament not held.
  • A = did not participate in the tournament.
  • SR = the ratio of the number of Grand Slam tournaments won to the number of those tournaments played.
  • Note: The Australian Open was held twice in 1977, in January and December.

Federation Cup[edit]

1981 Federation Cup
Date Venue Surface Round Opponents Final match score Match Opponent Rubber score
9–15 Nov
1981
Tokyo Clay 1R  Belgium 3–0 Singles Ann Gabriel 5–7, 6–3, 6–3 (W)
Doubles (with Sue Barker) de Witte/de Wouters 6–3, 6–3 (W)
F  United States 0–3 Doubles (with Virginia Wade) Casals/Jordan 4–6, 5–7 (L)
1982 Federation Cup
19–25 Nov
1982
Santa Clara Hard 1R  Italy 2–1 Singles Sabina Simmonds 6–4, 6–7, 1–6 (L)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Murgo/Simmonds 6–4, 6–3 (W)
2R  Israel 3–0 Singles Rafeket Binyamini 6–4, 6–2 (W)
QF  Czechoslovakia 1–2 Singles Helena Suková 3–6, 2–6 (L)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Budarova/Suková 6–2, 4–6, 6–3 (W)
1983 Federation Cup
17–24 Jul
1983
Zurich Clay 1R  Luxembourg 3–0 Singles Simone Wolter 6–2, 6–0 (W)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Huberty/Wolter 6–0, 6–0 (W)
2R  Brazil 3–0 Singles Patricia Medrado 6–4, 6–4 (W)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Medrado/Monteiro 6–3, 6–2 (W)
QF  West Germany 1–2 Singles Bettina Bunge 3–6, 4–6 (L)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Bunge/Pfaff 3–6, 6–4, 10–8 (W)
1984 Federation Cup
15–22 Jul
1984
Sao Paulo Clay 1R  Bulgaria 0–3 Singles Manuela Maleeva 4–6, 6–4, 4–6 (L)
1984 Federation Cup Consolation Rounds
15–22 Jul
1984
Sao Paulo Clay 1R BYE
2R  Hungary 2–1 Doubles (with Amanda Brown) Ritecz/Rozsavolgyi 6–2, 7–5 (W)
QF  Canada 2–1 Doubles (with Amanda Brown) Hetherington/Pelletier 7–6, 6–2 (W)
SF  Brazil 1–2 Singles Patricia Medrado 6–3, 6–1 (W)
1985 Federation Cup
6–14 Oct
1985
Nagoya Hard 1R  West Germany 3–0 Singles Petra Keppeler 6–4, 6–0 (W)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Betzner/Keppeler 6–4, 3–6, 6–1 (W)
2R  Japan 2–1 Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Inoue/Yanagi 6–7(2–7), 6–3, 6–2 (W)
QF  Bulgaria 1–2 Singles Katerina Maleeva 2–6, 6–4, 6–8 (L)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) K. Maleeva/Man. Maleeva 5–4, ret. (W)
1986 Federation Cup
20–27 Jul
1986
Prague Clay 1R  Denmark 0–3 Singles Tine Scheuer-Larsen 3–6, 1–6 (L)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Moller/Scheuer-Larsen 2–6, 6–7(1–7) (L)
1987 Federation Cup
26 Jul–
2 Aug 1987
Vancouver N/A 1R  Chile 3–0 Singles Macarena Miranda 6–2, 6–1 (W)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Espinoza/Miranda 6–1, 6–0 (W)
2R  Italy 2–1 Singles Raffaella Reggi 5–7, 4–6 (L)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Cecchini/Reggi 6–7, 7–5, 6–4 (W)
QF  United States 0–3 Singles Chris Evert 3–6, 1–6 (L)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Burgin/Garrison 5–7, 5–7 (L)
1989 Federation Cup
26 Jul–
2 Aug 1989
Tokyo Hard 1R  Indonesia 3–0 Singles Yayuk Basuki 6–2, 7–6(7–5) (W)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Anggarkusuma/Basuki 7–5, 6–3 (W)
2R  Austria 1–2 Singles Barbara Paulus 6–2, 4–6, 3–6 (L)
Doubles (with Anne Hobbs) Paulus/Schwarz 3–6, 7–6(7–3), 6–3 (W)
1990 Federation Cup
21–29 Jul
1990
Atlanta Hard 1R  Dominican Republic 3–0 Doubles (with Clare Wood) Sanchez/Schad 6–2, 6–0 (W)
2R  Italy 2–1 Doubles (with Clare Wood) Golarsa/Reggi 6–4, 6–1 (W)
QF  Austria 1–2 Singles Barbara Paulus 6–7(3–7), 7–5, 4–6 (L)
Doubles (with Clare Wood) Paulus/Reinstadler 5–2, ret. (W)
1991 Federation Cup
24 Jul 1991 Nottingham N/A 1R BYE
2R  Italy 0–2 Singles Sandra Cecchini 5–7, 4–6 (L)
1992 Federation Cup World Group1
13–17 Jul
1992
Frankfurt Clay 1R  United States 0–3 Singles Lori McNeil 5–7, 3–6 (L)
Doubles (with Clare Wood) Graham/Shriver 4–6, 6–7(6–8) (L)
PO
1R
 Chile 3–0 Singles Paula Cabezas 6–7(5–7), 6–0, 6–1 (W)
PO
(Final)
 Finland 1–2 Singles Petra Thoren 3–6, 5–7 (L)
1993 Federation Cup World Group2
20–22 Jul
1993
Frankfurt Clay 1R  Spain 0–3 Singles Conchita Martínez 2–6, 1–6 (L)
Doubles (with Clare Wood) Martínez/Sánchez Vicario 1–6, 6–4, 1–6 (L)
PO
(Relegation)
 Poland 1–2 Singles Magdalena Feistel 6–2, 5–7, ret. (L)
1994 Federation Cup Europe/Africa Zone (Group I)
18–23 Apr
1994
Bad Waltersdorf Clay RR  Luxembourg 3–0 Singles Rosabel Moyen 7–5, 6–0 (W)
Doubles (with Clare Wood) Kremer/Moyen 6–4, 6–0 (W)
 Russia 2–1 Singles Elena Makarova 4–6, 7–5, 7–5 (W)
PO
R1
 Israel 3–0 Singles Shiri Burstein 6–3, 6–2 (W)
Doubles (with Clare Wood) Burstein/Obziler 6–1, 6–0 (W)
PO
(Promotion)
 Belgium 0–2 Singles Dominique Monami 5–7, 3–6 (L)
1995 Federation Cup Europe/Africa Zone (Group I)
17–19 Apr
1995
Murcia Clay RR  Slovenia 1–2 Doubles (with Clare Wood) Jezernik/Križan 2–6, 6–1, 6–2 (W)
 Czech Republic 0–3 Doubles (with Clare Wood) Novotná/Suková 7–6(12–10), 1–6, 2–6 (L)
 Poland 2–1 Doubles (with Clare Wood) Grzybowska/Olsza 6–2, 7–5 (W)
  • 1 - In 1992 the sixteen teams which lost in the first round of the main draw were re-drawn to face each other to maintain their positions in the World Group in 1993. The four teams which won their two knock-out play-off ties successfully defended their places in the World Group whilst the 12 teams which did not were relegated.
  • 2 - In 1993 the sixteen teams which lost in the first round of the main draw were re-drawn to face each other to maintain their positions in the World Group in 1994. The eight teams which won their knock-out play-off ties successfully defended their places in the World Group whilst the eight losing teams were relegated.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1], additional text.
  2. ^ WTA singles ranking, 31 December 1981

External links[edit]