Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department

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Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD)
Common name Metro, Metro PD
Abbreviation LVMPD
Las Vegas, NV Metropolitan Police.jpg
Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department patch
Motto "Partners With the Community"
Agency overview
Formed July 1, 1973
Preceding agencies
  • Las Vegas Police Department
  • Clark County Sheriff's Department
Employees 5,119 Authorized Total (2011)
Annual budget FY 2011-2012: $501,307,011
Legal personality Governmental: Government agency
Jurisdictional structure
Population 1,996,542
Legal jurisdiction Clark County, Nevada (excluding cities of Henderson, North Las Vegas, Boulder City and Mesquite).
General nature
Operational structure
Headquarters 400 S. Martin L. King Boulevard; Las Vegas, Nevada
Police Officers 2,743 (2011)
Sheriff responsible Douglas C. Gillespie
Agency executive Joseph Lombardo, Sheriff-Elect
Facilities
Area Commands 8
Airbases 1
Detention Centers 3
Marked and Unmarked Cars 2000+
Helicopters 7
Dogs 35
Horses 12
Website
Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department's website
Footnotes
* Divisional agency: Sub division of the country, over which the agency has usual operational jurisdiction.

The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (also known as the LVMPD or Metro) is a joint city-county police force for the City of Las Vegas and Clark County, Nevada. It is headed by the Sheriff of Clark County, elected every four years. The current Sheriff of Clark County is Douglas C. Gillespie, who became sheriff in January 2007[1] and was elected to a second term in November 2010.[2] The sheriff is the only elected head law enforcement officer within the county, and, as such, the department is not under the direct control of the city, county or state.

Metro is the largest law enforcement agency in the state of Nevada, and one of the largest police agencies in the United States.[3]

History[edit]

The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD) was formed on July 1, 1973, by merging the Las Vegas Police Department with the Clark County Sheriff's Department. Metro serves the city limits of Las Vegas and the unincorporated areas of Clark County.

In the early 1970s, both the Las Vegas Police Department and the Clark County Sheriff's Department struggled with jurisdictional and budgetary problems. Oftentimes, people living in the metropolitan area would call the wrong agency to report crimes in progress, which would delay police response. Both agencies were also strapped for manpower, yet used a lot of it duplicating record-keeping and administrative functions in both of the agencies. The idea of consolidating the two law enforcement agencies into one metropolitan department began to circulate among the top officials in both agencies, likely due to the close working relationship between the Clark County Sheriff and the Las Vegas Police Chief at that time. It was said that even police officers on the Las Vegas Police Department could see that it would be better if the agency were run by the Sheriff, due to the fact that he was an elected official. Legislation to merge the Las Vegas Police Department with the Clark County Sheriff's Department was passed by the Nevada State Legislature, and the merger became effective in 1973.[4]

In 1999, an outside audit, commissioned by the City of Las Vegas and conducted by DMG-Maximus, commended the department for having fewer managers and supervisors than are typically found in large police agencies. The audit also said that the managers, both sworn and civilian, were of "excellent quality."[5] The auditors found that the recruitment and selection program was "among the best we have encountered in recent years." Although the city had planned to commission a second phase of the study, DMG-Maximus auditors said they were so impressed with the department that further study was unnecessary, saving the city $180,000 that had been allocated for the audit.[5]

Metro has more than 5,100 members. Of these, over 2,700 are police officers of various ranks and over 750 are corrections officers of various ranks.

Radio system[edit]

LVMPD operates on a digital radio system (DesertSky), which was turned on in 2011. In 2010, the agency began a transition from the former analog system to this new digital radio system. The transition to DesertSky has been slow, and some analog frequencies will remain for outside access after full utilization. DesertSky is LVMPD's nickname for official name of "OpenSky," developed by what is now Harris Corporation.

On October 11, 2012, after two years of battling dropped calls and dead zones in the department's new radio system, Clark County Sheriff Doug Gillespie has opted to drop Desert Sky. Sheriff Douglas Gillespie informed the CEO of the Harris Corp. that his company's Desert Sky radio system cannot meet his department's needs. That's a sharp change from past statements and advice to officers to remain patient while system bugs are fixed. "I believe we've given Harris every opportunity to make the system work," Gillespie said. "It's just not a reliable system."

The decision to dump Desert Sky comes in the midst of the Metropolitan Police Department's worst budget crisis ever. The county wide agency's projected budget of $502 million for fiscal year 2013-14 is $46 million more than projected revenues.

Police officials say hiring a vendor to build a replacement voice transmission system could cost $15 million to $20 million, and take 16 to 24 months.[6]

Headquarters[edit]

Construction was completed on LVMPD's 370,500-square-foot headquarters, located at 400 S. Martin L. King Boulevard, in mid 2011. The building consolidated 27 bureaus, which were previously located in leased buildings around Las Vegas. It also houses the Southern Nevada Counter Terrorism Center, Police Records, and a Fingerprint Bureau annex.

Fallen officers[edit]

The LVMPD and the agencies that existed prior to consolidation to form the agency, the Clark County Sheriff's Office, and City of Las Vegas Police Department have had officers killed in action.

On February 22, 1978, Motorcycle Officer James Rogan was shot and killed by a suspect while making a traffic stop on Paradise Road. During the stop, the suspect suddenly shot him, and as Rogan laid on the ground, the suspect stood over him and fired several more shots into his body, killing him.

On March 18, 1979, Correctional Officer James Harbin was shot and killed while on his way to work when he interrupted a robbery at a local convenience store. As he entered the store, the clerk tried to warn him that a robbery was in progress. When the suspect saw Harbin in uniform he opened fire, thinking Harbin was a police officer. The suspect was apprehended after holding officers at bay for several hours.

On August 12, 1979, Officer Clark Wooldridge was killed in an automobile accident while responding to a report of a fight caused by a traffic crash. During the response, his patrol car collided with another vehicle, overturned, and became engulfed in flames. Another officer who was responding to the call was able to pull Wooldridge, who was unconscious, from the vehicle. The officer, along with the assistance of a citizen, carried him away from the burning car. He was transported to a local hospital where he succumbed to his injuries two days later.

On October 11, 1988, Motorcycle Officer Marc Kahre was shot and killed while following a shooting suspect. While on patrol, Kahre spotted the suspect and began to follow him as he requested backup to make a traffic stop. Before backup could arrive, the suspect suddenly stopped and opened fire, striking Kahre in the head. At the same time, a second officer arrived and returned fire, striking the suspect five times, wounding him. The suspect was able to get back into his car and drive away. He crashed the vehicle a short time later and committed suicide.

On October 23, 1992, Officer Donald Weese was killed while responding to a call for help of an officer under fire. Weese was responding in code along with a trainee and entered an intersection. A vehicle, whose driver did not see Weese's cruiser, entered the intersection as well and broadside the cruiser, causing it to spin into a light post. Weese was killed instantly and his trainee sustained other injuries. The rescue department had to use the Jaws-of-Life in order to free Weese's body from the wreckage.

On March 24, 1998, Officer Russell L. Peterson was killed while participating in a training exercise for the police department's Search and Rescue Team.

In 2006, Sergeant Henry Prendes became the first Metro officer in 18 years to be shot and killed in the line of duty. Officer Donald Weese died in the line of duty in 1989 as a result of a traffic accident, while Officer Russell Peterson died in 1998 during a training exercise near Mount Charleston. Officer Marc Kahre was shot and killed in the line of duty in 1988. He was the 22nd law enforcement official to be killed on duty in Clark County since the City of Las Vegas was founded.[7]

In the early morning hours of May 7, 2009, Officer James "Jamie" Manor of Enterprise Area Command was driving in excess of 100 MPH without flashing lights or siren and killed as a result of a traffic collision while en route to a possible domestic violence call.[8] Officer Manor was the 23rd officer in Clark County to be killed in the line of duty.

On the night of October 7, 2009, Officer Milburn "Millie" Beitel and another officer in the passenger seat were both seriously injured in a single-vehicle crash. Beitel died the early morning hours of October 8, 2009, from his injuries. The accident happened exactly five months after Officer James Manor died in a crash in his patrol car.

On November 19, 2009, Officer Trevor Nettleton was shot to death in his garage after exchanging fire with three men in a botched robbery attempt. The department considered this death 'in the line of duty' as he drew his police weapon in defense of himself and family, and Nettleton has been laid to rest with full police honors.

On November 21, 2009, Corrections Officer Daniel Leach, while on duty, was killed in a car accident near Searchlight, Nevada.

On July 22, 2013, Officer Dave Vanbuskirk died after falling during a night-time aerial rescue operation of a hiker on Mount Charleston. The hiker had become disoriented and was stranded on a rock ledge near Mary Jane Falls. A Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department helicopter located the hiker and lowered Vanbuskirk to the location. Vanbuskirk, a member of the Search and Rescue Section, attached the hiker to the hoist. As the helicopter began to raise the two to the helicopter, Vanbuskirk became detached from the line and fell to his death to the canyon floor below.

On June 8, 2014, Officers Igor Soldo and Alyn Beck were ambushed while they were eating lunch at CiCi's Pizza by a married couple, Jerad and Amanda Miller, who entered the restaurant and shot the officers, yelling, "This is a revolution." They then took the officers' weapons and ammunition and went across the street to a Walmart store and opened fire, resulting in the death of an armed civilian, Joseph Wilcox, who attempted to stop the suspects. Jerad Miller was shot and killed by arriving officers, while an injured Amanda Miller killed herself shortly afterward. Soldo and Beck were transported to the hospital where they were pronounced dead.[9] The suspects were identified as Jerad and Amanda Miller.[10]

Funding[edit]

The department is funded by both the City of Las Vegas and Clark County. Funding is based on a complex formula that includes population, calls for service, and felony crimes in the prior year. Both governments must approve the annual budget including their percentage of budget. Additionally the department itself generates approximately 33% of its funds through property tax, and the charging for certain services, such as special events, work cards, and privileged license investigations. Additional funding is generated from a special sales tax to fund commissioned positions. By state law, the sheriff is charged with running the county jail, known as the Clark County Detention Center or CCDC, which is funded solely by the government and tax base of Clark County.

Organization[edit]

There are two commissioned career tracks in the LVMPD. They have identical civil service rank structures and pay, but different day-to-day tasks and responsibilities.

  • Corrections: These officers are tasked with operating, managing and supervising the Clark County Detention Center: there are over 750 currently.
    • Corrections Officer 690
    • Corrections Sergeant 66
    • Corrections Lieutenant 19
    • Corrections Captain 6
  • Police: These officers are assigned all over the department; there are over 2700 currently.
    • Police Officer 2263
    • Police Sergeant 281
    • Police Lieutenant 74
    • Police Captain 22

Major patrol responsibilities are covered by bike patrols, motorcycle units and patrol cars assigned to the following units:

The LVMPD is divided into eight urban area commands:

  • Bolden (Sectors U and W) - serves the west central portion of the city, including the old westside, an area bordered by I-15, US-95, Rancho Drive and Lake Mead Boulevard.
  • Convention Center (Sector M) - Las Vegas Strip and Las Vegas Convention Center areas
  • Downtown (Sectors A, B and C)- this division serves Downtown Las Vegas and areas roughly east of Eastern, south of Owens and north of Sahara Avenue to include the 'Naked City' and Fremont Street areas.
  • Northeast (Sectors F and G) - Sector F includes unincorporated areas of North Las Vegas and the Las Vegas Speedway/Nellis AFB area.
  • Northwest (Sectors V and X) - serves areas generally west of Decatur Blvd and north of Charleston Blvd.
  • Southeast (Sectors H, J and K) - serves areas east of Maryland Parkway and south of Sahara Blvd. Sector J includes unincorporated areas of Henderson.
  • Enterprise (Formerly Southwest - as of July 7, 2008) (Sectors O, P, R and S)- this area serves mostly the southwest valley west of I-15 and south of Charleston Blvd. Also includes Chinatown.
  • South Central (Sectors I, N) This area command serves the areas south of McCarran Airport between Interstate 15 and roughly Eastern Avenue.

When Metro was formed in 1973, the Las Vegas Valley was served by only three area commands: North, South and West.

Other major coverage details:

  • Traffic Bureau (All Sectors)
  • Airport (Sector Q)
  • nine different rural areas outside the Las Vegas Valley including:

Rank structure[edit]

The LVMPD rank structure is as follows:

Title Insignia
Sheriff
4 Gold Stars.svg
Undersheriff
3 Gold Stars.svg
Assistant Sheriff
2 Gold Stars.svg
Deputy Chief
1 Gold Star.svg
Captain
Captain insignia gold.svg
Lieutenant
US-O1 insignia.svg
Sergeant
LASD Sergeant.jpg
Police Officer I / Police Officer II No insignia

Enforcement areas[edit]

Persons arrested by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department enter the criminal justice system at the Clark County Detention Center in Las Vegas.

This department provides law enforcement services for all of Clark County, including the City of Las Vegas, yielding primary jurisdiction to the following agencies:

Structure[edit]

The LVMPD is led by the sheriff, second in command is the undersheriff, who is assisted by four assistant sheriffs. The Office of Intergovernmental Services, the Office of General Counsel, the Office of Public Information, the Office of Finance, The Police Employee Assistance Program (PEAP), and the Office of the Sheriff Executive Staff report to the undersheriff.

Four of the six elected Clark County sheriffs since the LVMPD was consolidated in 1973 are former members of either the Clark County Sheriff's Office (CCSO) or Las Vegas Police Department (LVPD). Former Sheriff Young and current Sheriff Gillespie are retired members of the LVMPD (that is they were commissioned solely as members of the LVMPD) Sheriff Gillespie rose to, and retired at, the appointed rank of undersheriff prior to assuming public office as the duly elected Sheriff of Clark County.

The ranks of undersheriff, assistant sheriff, and deputy chief are appointed from the highest civil service rank of captain. These positions serve at the pleasure of the sheriff and as such, if they lose the confidence of the person who holds that office, they can be returned to their civil service rank of captain if they choose not to simply retire. Division directors are civilian appointees that head divisions as would a deputy chief. Of additional note, at various points in the department's history the appointed rank of Commander has been used between the ranks of deputy chief and captain.

The undersheriff is second in command to the sheriff. The position is currently held by Undersheriff Jim Dixon.

The Law Enforcement Services Group Assistant Sheriff (currently Assistant Sheriff Joseph Lombardo) oversees two divisions, each overseen by a deputy chief or division director. The divisions are: Technical Services Division (made up of the Criminalistics Bureau, Police Records Bureau, Fingerprint Bureau, and Logistics Bureau); Professional Standards Division (Office of Human Resources, Organizational Development Bureau, and the Internal Affairs Bureau). Additionally, the Information Technologies Bureau reports directly to Assistant Sheriff Lombardo.

The Law Enforcement Operations Group Assistant Sheriff (currently Assistant Sheriff Theodore Moody) oversees 2 divisions, both led by a deputy chief. The divisions are: Detention Services Division (made up of the DSD Records Bureau, South Tower Bureau, Central Booking Bureau, North Tower Bureau, Administrative Operations Bureau, and the Staff Operations Bureau), and the Patrol Division (made up of the Downtown Area Command, Bolden Area Command, Northeast Area Command, Northwest Area Command, Enterprise Area Command, Convention Center Area Command, Southeast Area Command, and the South Central Area Command)

The Law Enforcement Investigations and Support Group Assistant Sheriff (currently Assistant Sheriff Ray Flynn) oversees two divisions, both led by a deputy chief. The divisions are: The Investigative Services Division (made up of the Robbery/Homicide Bureau, Crimes Against Youth/Family Bureau, Gang Crimes Bureau, and the Financial/Property Crimes Bureau), and the Special Operations Division (made up of the Airport Bureau, Communications Bureau, Support Operations Bureau, and the Traffic Bureau).

The Homeland Security Investigations and Support Group Assistant Sheriff (currently Greg McCurdy) oversees a single division. The Homeland Security Division is led by a deputy chief consists of the Southern Nevada Counterterrorism Center (SNCTC), Emergency Operations Bureau, Organized Crime Bureau, and the Vice/Narcotics Bureau.

Area commands and bureaus are typically led by captains. The captains in turn manage a staff of 1 to 4 lieutenants who in turn manage a staff of 4 or 5 sergeants. Sergeants typically supervise 6-12 police officers, corrections officers, or detectives and civilian support staff. Sections are typically led by lieutenants.

A typical substation or area command has a captain, three or four police lieutenants, sixteen police sergeants, and 130-150 police officers.[citation needed]

Volunteer program[edit]

The department maintains an active volunteer program called the Metro Volunteer Program or MVP. The program publishes a monthly newsletter available on the department web site. MVPs are used within the department in any area that is not law enforcement as the volunteers are not law enforcement officers.

The program was honored in 2011 as the winner for Outstanding Achievement in Law Enforcement Volunteer Program by the International Association of Chiefs of Police.[11]

Training[edit]

  • LVMPD Recruit Training Academy

The LVMPD operates its own training academy—officially the LVMPD Recruit Training Academy, but referred to by members the department as 'The Academy'.[citation needed] New recruits are required to attend a 26-week academy. This includes those who have attended another police academy. The academy is composed of a hand-picked training staff of senior police officers who are recognized experts in multiple fields, including police academics, patrol tactics, procedure, defensive tactics/martial arts, physical fitness, and firearms skills.

The academy is headquartered at the Jerry Keller Training Facility next to the Northwest Area Command station. The first 12 weeks are held at that location. During the initial phase, the recruits' training is centered around intense physical conditioning, basic defensive tactics, and academic classroom instruction.

The remainder of the academy is located at the Mojave Training Facility adjacent to the Northeast Area Command. At this facility, the recruit's training becomes less academic-based and far more practical-application-based. The concentration of the curriculum focuses on intense defensive tactics/martial art instruction and advanced police tactics. It is also during this phase that the police recruit receives firearms training and the Emergency Vehicle Operator's Course.

The LVMPD Recruit Training Academy is nationally regarded as one of the toughest police academies in the nation, both physically and academically.[citation needed] The drop-out rate is roughly 35 percent.[citation needed]

In addition to police academics, the recruits must successfully complete a basic Spanish language program which is taught throughout the academy training.

The LVMPD runs a separate academy for corrections officer. This academy is located inside the Clark County Detention Center (CCDC).[citation needed] and is similar to the police academy, but somewhat shorter in duration.

On June 15, 2012, the Las Vegas Sun reported that Sheriff Doug Gillespie announced in a video release that LVMPD is instituting a hiring freeze as it faces a potential deficit of nearly $70 million in its 2013-14 budget, and that a Metro Police Corrections Academy currently under way would continue, but a Metro Police Academy scheduled for July would be canceled.[12]

  • Field Training and Evaluation Program (FTEP)

Upon successful completion of academy, the new officers' training continues during a 19-week Field Training and Evaluation Program (FTEP), during which new officer rides side-by-side with a certified Field Training Officer (FTO) who grades and evaluates the new officers.

The role of the FTO is also to train the new officer in real-world application of the skills learned at the academy in a student/master relationship. The new officer is assigned to a new FTO every three weeks for a total of six FTOs over two 'phases' (9 weeks in Phase 1, 10 weeks Phase 2). The new officer must show a measured level of skill and competency to advance through the phases.

The final three weeks FTEP are 'solo' weeks in which the new officer rides by himself or herself for at least two shifts per week under the close scrutiny of his/her final FTO. At the successful completion of the FTEP program, the new officer is transferred to his/her first duty patrol squad and is officially a police officer.

From the day the recruit enters the academy to the day he or she completes training and is a solo police officer patrolling the street is 45 weeks.

  • In-Service / Continued Training and Education

The LVMPD also places emphasis on its continuing training for its sworn police officers. LVMPD officers are required to attend quarterly firearms training and re-qualifications, quarterly defensive tactics training, a vigorous annual Advanced Officer Survival Tactics course, various required on-line classes per year.

One complete shift every two weeks is also dedicated for squad-level training. This does not include special skill or specialized unit specific mandated training. The LVMPD encourages its officers to attend as much training as is possible to learn new skills and stay current with cutting-edge law enforcement techniques and tactics.

The Emergency Vehicle Operations Course (EVOC) takes place at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. Police officers complete their initial course of training for EVOC at the academy. Commissioned officers then must re-certify every two years during an additional 10-hour EVOC course.

Motorcycle officers must initially attend and pass a three-week police Motorcycle Riders Course. They then must re-certify every six months in order to continue operating a motorcycle for duty.

  • Citizen training

The department also operates two Citizen's Police Academies.[13] One of these is a regular academy and the second is a Spanish Citizen's Police Academy.

Specialized units[edit]

For individual unit specifics and detail see following section, "Specialized Unit Specifics."

Organizational Structure in place as of December 2011:

Detention Services Division (DSD)

  • Clark County Detention Center (commonly known as "CCDC" by officers)
  • Crime Stoppers - (702) 385-5555
  • Crisis Intervention Team
  • YES- Youth Education Services Detail (Formerly DARE)
  • Field Training Officer (FTO)
  • Homeland Security Division
    • Vice/Narcotics Bureau
    • Southern Nevada Counterterrorism Center (SNCTC)
      • Counter Terrorism Section
      • ANSEC (Analytical Section)
    • Emergency Operations Bureau
      • ARMOR Section
      • SWAT
        • Crisis Negotiation Team
      • Emergency Management
    • Organized Crime Bureau
      • Criminal Intelligence
      • Special Investigations
  • Investigative Services Division
    • Gang Crimes Bureau
    • Robbery/Homicide Bureau
      • Robbery Section
      • Homicide Section
      • Career Criminal Section
        • Fugitive Detail
        • Criminal Apprehension Team (CAT) Federal Task Force (FBI, LVMPD)
        • Repeat Offenders Program (ROP)
      • Violent Crimes Section
    • Crimes Against Youth and Family Bureau
      • Abuse/Neglect Detail
      • Computer Forensics Lab, LV-ECTF (Federal Task Force with United States Secret Service)
      • Domestic Violence Detail
      • Missing Persons
      • Sexual Assault Detail
      • Sexual Abuse Detail
    • Financial - Property Crimes Bureau
      • Auto Theft
      • VIPER
      • Firearms Section
      • Forgery Detail
      • Fraud Detail
      • Construction Theft
  • Special Operations Division
    • Airport Bureau
    • Communications Bureau
    • Support Operations Bureau
      • Mobile Crime Saturation Team
      • Special Events Section
      • Air Support
      • Search and Rescue
      • Laughlin
      • Resident Officer Section
      • K-9
    • Traffic Bureau
  • Patrol Division
    • Northwest Area Command
    • Bolden Area Command
    • Downtown Area Command
    • Northeast Area Command
    • Enterprise Area Command
    • Convention Center Area Command
      • Tourist Crimes Unit- Operates out of the Convention Center Area Command
      • Mounted police- Operates out of the Convention Center Area Command
    • South Central Area Command
    • Southeast Area Command
  • Professional Standards Division
    • Office of Human Resources
      • Metro Volunteer Program
    • Internal Affairs Bureau
    • Organizational Development Bureau
      • Firearms Range
      • EVOC (Emergency Vehicle Operations Course)
      • In-service Training
      • UMLV - Metro's Online training system
      • AOST (Advanced Officer Skills Training)
      • Academy
      • CIRT
      • Quality Assurance
  • Technical Services Division
    • Criminalistics Bureau (CSA a.k.a. CSI)
    • Police Records Bureau
    • Fingerprint Bureau
    • Logistics Bureau

Specialized unit specifics[edit]

SWAT The LVMPD SWAT team is a nationally respected organization.[citation needed] The team, composed of nearly 40 operators, is one of a handful of full-time SWAT teams in the country. The team's main objective is to save lives, victims as well as suspects. They are on the cutting edge on the use of a constantly changing array of less-lethal weapons and munitions. Team members are highly trained and work in no less than two-man cells. They are referred to as Zebra units and not called the 'Zebra Squadron' as it is asserted by the narrator on an often repeated cable documentary. However, their designated LVMPD call sign is Z, phonetically in the LVMPD alphabet- Zebra. The individual officers are denoted by their seniority in the unit. Therefore, Z1 (or Zebra 1) is the most senior operator and Z37 is the junior. This nomenclature applies to other units within the department as well. LVMPD SWAT conducts their training both for LVMPD recruits and seasoned officers within the department plus visiting agencies from across the country. In any given year, they will respond to an average of 55 hostage incidents and execute over 365 high risk search warrants and/or arrest warrants.[citation needed]

Traffic Also called 'Motors' is currently the largest of all-Harley Davidson fleet in the country[citation needed] and has over 160 officers assigned. Traffic does specialized enforcement as dictated by the Office of the Sheriff, on the freeways, main and secondary roads, and schools. Motors is responsible for the majority of the DUI arrests and citations written in Clark County. These units are called "Tom" units - with a 3-digit or 4-digit number (the first designating its shift, and the last two or three digits representing the officer's seniority). E.g. T3115 would be a swing shift (3) officer who is 115th in seniority within the unit.

K-9 Currently, the LVMPD K-9 Detail has 21 officers (including three sergeants) and 21 patrol dogs, trained to locate human scent. These dogs search for suspects, lost victims, and evidence that suspects may have discarded. Seven are European bred German Shepherds, one Dutch Shepherd, and 13 are Belgian Malinois.

LVMPD has 15 detection dogs, nine are narcotic detector dogs which are trained to locate marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine and heroin. They use hunting breeds such as Springer Spaniels and Labrador Retrievers. They also have six explosive detector dogs used to locate various explosives. In addition to the dogs assigned to K-9, LVMPD has six other narcotic detector dogs. Five of these dogs are assigned to the Narcotics Detail, Interdiction Team. They have one Springer Spaniel, and a Black and Yellow Labrador. The sixth is assigned to the Resident Section, Laughlin, and is a Black Labrador.[citation needed]

Fallen K-9 Officers

K-9 Unit Partner(s)
Mars Explosives Dog Tom Moore
Ben Explosives Dog Duwayne Layton
Apollo Patrol Dog John Jenkins
Roscoe Narcotics Dog Scott Murray
Fred Patrol Dog DuWayne Layton
Rudy Patrol Dog Mel English and Darren Garness
Winston Narcotics Dog Eric Kerns and Danny Southwell
Breston Patrol Dog Steve Junge
Rudi Patrol Dog John Jenkins
Duke Narcotics Dog Mike Horn and Mike Blasko
Dak Patrol Dog Mike Horn and Mike Campbell
Danny Patrol Dog Frank Sorrentino
Clyde Explosives Dog Duwayne Layton and Jay Carlson
Cigan Patrol Dog Rory Tuggle
Buddy Patrol Dog John Jenkins
Ex Patrol Dog Pat Barry, Bob Hindi, and Robert Johnson
Laslo Patrol Dog Jay Carlson
Moss Explosives Dog Jay Carlson

Sexual Abuse Detail In late 2014, press reports indicated the department had about four thousand untested rape kits on hand. [14]

Firearms[edit]

Firearms training takes place at the LVMPD John T Moran Tactical Firearms Training Facility located near Nellis Air Force Base, and named for the department's second sheriff. The facility is used by numerous local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. At the facility, recruits receive several weeks of firearms training during the academy. Commissioned police officers must attend firearms re-qualification four times a year. This re-qualification is for all firearms. The qualifications include known-distance targets and tactical courses of fire in both regular and low-light.

Clark County Detention Center[edit]

Public entrance

The department operates the detention facility. It is used to house inmates arrested in their patrol area, with the exception of misdemeanors committed in the City of Las Vegas, which maintains its own jail. In addition, it also holds persons who are wanted for extradition to another jurisdiction, persons who are awaiting a bail hearing or trial, or those persons serving a sentence of 364 days or less.

Misconduct[edit]

Since the late 1970s, more than 100 LVMPD officers and civilian employees have been implicated in documented instances of police misconduct and/or actual criminal activity, with numerous incidents resulting in lawsuit settlements in excess of a million dollars a piece.

LVMPD in media[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Las Vegas Review-Journal, "Gillespie sworn in as sheriff," Jan. 3, 2007
  2. ^ "Democrats keep control of Clark County Commission," Nov. 2, 2010
  3. ^ Federal Bureau of Investigation: Uniform Crime Reports. 2009. http://www2.fbi.gov/ucr/cius2009/data/table_78.html
  4. ^ http://www.reviewjournal.com/news/ralph-lamb
  5. ^ a b Zapler, Mike (March 11, 1999). "Police use of workforce draws praise". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved March 11, 1999. 
  6. ^ Las Vegas Review-Journal, "Las Vegas police dump problem radio system," October 29, 2012
  7. ^ Planas, Antonio (February 2, 2006). "Slain officer is 17th Southern Nevada law enforcement officer to die on duty since 1933". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved February 18, 2009. 
  8. ^ Mower, Lawrence (May 21, 2009). "DEADLY CRASH: Officer was driving 109". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved December 28, 2009. 
  9. ^ "Suspected Las Vegas gunmen believed to be white supremacists who targeted police, report says". Fox News Channel. June 8, 2014. Retrieved June 9, 2014. 
  10. ^ [1]
  11. ^ "IACP/Wilmington University Award for Outstanding Achievement in Law Enforcement Volunteer Programs". International Association of Chiefs of Police. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  12. ^ Las Vegas Sun, "Metro instituting hiring freeze, sheriff informs officers", June 15, 2012
  13. ^ "CITIZEN'S POLICE ACADEMY". Retrieved February 18, 2009. 
  14. ^ New York Initiative to help Other Cities Clear Rape-Kit Backlogs; by Tatinana Scholossberg, 14 November 2014, New York Times
  15. ^ Las Vegas Sun, "Shakur's mother rips Metro Police," by [[Cathy Scott, February 5, 1997]

External links[edit]