Maxinquaye

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Maxinquaye
Studio album by Tricky
Released 20 February 1995 (1995-02-20) (UK)
18 April 1995 (1995-04-18) (US)
Recorded 1994–1995, Tricky's home studio, Loveshack Studios, Eastcote Studios, London
Genre Trip hop
Length 57:13
Label Island
Producer Tricky, Mark Saunders, Howie B, Kevin Petrie
Tricky chronology
Maxinquaye
(1995)
Nearly God
(1996)

Maxinquaye is the debut album of the English musician Tricky, released in 1995. Expanding on the sonic template of fellow Bristolians Massive Attack, and featuring then-girlfriend Martina Topley-Bird on vocals, Maxinquaye is a dark, mysterious album featuring a combination of hip-hop, soul, dub, rock and electronica.

Maxinquaye, named after Tricky's late mother Maxine Quaye, received critical acclaim. The album was re-issued in the UK on 2 November 2009 by Universal Island with a second disc of remixes as a "Deluxe Edition".[1]

Album background[edit]

Tricky chose Mark Saunders as co-producer of the album due to his previous work with The Cure on the albums Wish and Mixed Up, and they recorded the album in the first half of 1994 at Tricky's home studio, with later work done at the Loveshack and Eastcote studios in Notting Hill, London.[2]

The sessions for the album were somewhat chaotic, and Saunders, who had the impression that he would serve as an engineer, frequently found himself serving as a DJ and programmer.[2][3] Tricky frequently instructed him on what to sample, regardless of different tempos and pitches, and asked him to piece the result together, something Saunders achieved by pitch-shifting the respective samples.[2][3]

Various contributors were occasionally called in to play instruments, such as guitarist James Stevenson, bassist Pete Briquette, the band FTV (on "Black Steel"). The producer Saunders contributed guitar himself, with the resulting improvisations treated as samples.[2] Adding to the free-form atmosphere of the sessions, Martina Topley-Bird's vocals were recorded in the first take without any planning beforehand.

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 5/5 stars[4]
Entertainment Weekly A[5]
Robert Christgau A+[6]
Rolling Stone 4/5 stars[7]
Record Collector 4/5 stars[8]
Slant Magazine 4.5/5 stars[9]
Q Magazine 5/5 stars[10]
The Observer 5/5 stars[11]
Spin 8/10 stars[12]
Clash 9/10 stars[13]
  • Q (6/00, p. 75) – Ranked No. 36 in Q's "100 Greatest British Albums"
  • Q (12/99, p. 84) – Included in Q's "90 Best Albums of the 1990s".
  • Q (2/96, p. 67) – Included in Q's 50 Best Albums of 1995.
  • Rolling Stone (13/5/99, p. 80) – Included in Rolling Stone's "Essential Recordings of the 90's".
  • Rolling Stone (25/1/96, p. 41) – Ranked No. 3 in the 1995 Critics' Poll.
  • Spin (9/99, p. 125) – Ranked No. 14 in Spin Magazine's "90 Greatest Albums of the '90s."
  • Spin (12/95, p. 62) – Ranked No. 2 on Spin's list of the '20 Best Albums of '95'.
  • Melody Maker (23–30/12/95, pp. 66–67) – Tied for No. 1 on Melody Maker's list of 1995's 'Albums of the Year'.
  • Village Voice (20/2/96) – Ranked No. 2 in Village Voice's 1995 Pazz & Jop Critics' Poll.
  • Mojo (p. 57)[which?] – Ranked No. 77 in Mojo's "100 Modern Classics".
  • The New York Times (5/1/96, p. C16) – Included on Jon Pareles's list of the Top 10 Albums of '95.
  • NME (23–30/12/95, pp. 22–23) – Ranked No. 1 in NME's 'Top 50 Albums of the Year' for 1995.[14]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Sample Length
1. "Overcome"   "Moonchild" (Shakespears Sister) 4:30
2. "Ponderosa"   "O Maa Tujhe Salaam" (Jagjit Singh), "Midnight Theme" (Manzel) 3:31
3. "Black Steel"   "Rukkumani Rukkuman" (A. R. Rahman) 5:40
4. "Hell Is Round the Corner"   "Ike's Rap II" (Isaac Hayes) & "Glory Box" (Portishead) 3:47
5. "Pumpkin" (featuring Alison Goldfrapp) "Suffer" (The Smashing Pumpkins) 4:31
6. "Aftermath"   "That's the Way Love Is" (Marvin Gaye), "Eat 'Em Up L Chill" (LL Cool J), "How Can I Be Sure" (The Young Rascals) 7:39
7. "Abbaon Fat Tracks"     4:27
8. "Brand New You're Retro"   "Bad" (Michael Jackson), "Mind Terrorist" (Public Enemy) 2:54
9. "Suffocated Love"   "Look in My Eyes" (The Chantels) 4:53
10. "You Don't"     4:39
11. "Strugglin'"     6:39
12. "Feed Me"   "Sound of Da Police" (KRS-One) 4:04

Track notes[edit]

Singles[edit]

UK singles, with release dates and peak positions in the singles chart:

  • "Aftermath" (24 January 1994) – No. 69
  • "Ponderosa" (25 April 1994)
  • "Overcome" (16 January 1995) – No. 34
  • "Black Steel" (3 April 1995) – No. 28
  • The Hell E.P. ("Hell Is Round the Corner") (24 July 1995) – No. 12
  • "Pumpkin" (30 October 1995) – No. 26

Soundtrack appearances[edit]

Personnel[edit]

  • Howie B – composer, producer ("Ponderosa")
  • Pete Briquette – bass ("Suffocated Love")
  • FTV – guitar, drums ("Black Steel")
  • Alison Goldfrapp – vocals ("Pumpkin")
  • Martina Topley-Bird – vocals
  • Kevin Petrie – producer ("Aftermath")
  • Ragga (Ragnhildur Gísladóttir) – vocals ("You Don't")
  • Mark Saunders – keyboards ("Overcome"), guitar, producer ("Overcome", "Black Steel", "Hell Is Round the Corner", "Brand New You're Retro", "Suffocated Love", "You Don't", "Strugglin'", "Feed Me")
  • James Stevenson – guitar ("Brand New, You're Retro")
  • Mark Stewart – vocals ("Aftermath")
  • Tricky – Composer, vocals, producer
  • Tony Wrafter – flute ("Aftermath")
  • Ali Staton – mixing ("Suffocated Love")
  • David Alvarez – art direction, design
  • Cally Callomon – art direction, design
  • Richard Baker – artwork
  • Rob Crane – artwork
  • Andy Earl – photography
  • Paul Rider – photography
  • Valerie Philips – photography

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tricky Maxinquaye Re-Issue Details – 9 Sep 2009 | Clash Music Latest Breaking Music News". Clashmusic.com. 9 September 2009. Retrieved 2012-03-01. 
  2. ^ a b c d Buskin, Richard (June 2007). "CLASSIC TRACKS: Tricky 'Black Steel'". Sound on Sound. Retrieved 12 December 2009. 
  3. ^ a b Byers, Will (10 September 2008). "School of rock: The power of production". guardian.co.uk Music Blog. Retrieved 12 December 2009. 
  4. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Maxinquaye > Review". Allmusic. Retrieved 23 August 2009. 
  5. ^ Browne, David (2 June 1995). "Maxinquaye: Music Review:Entertainment Weekly". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 23 August 2009. 
  6. ^ Christgau, Robert. "CG: Tricky". robertchristgau.com. Retrieved 23 August 2009. 
  7. ^ Hunter, James (2 February 1998). "Maxinquaye: Tricky: Review". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 23 August 2009. 
  8. ^ Record Collector (magazine) (p.96) – 4 stars out of 5 – "MAXINQUAYE remains the British postmodern album of the 90s....'Brand New Retro' is the most driving thing here..."
  9. ^ Cinquemani, Sal (2 November 2002). "Tricky: Maxinquaye | Music Review". Slant Magazine. Retrieved 23 August 2009. 
  10. ^ Q (Magazine) (p.132) – 5 stars out of 5 – "[I]t's an album of contradictions, at once restless an soothing, profane and profound....His experiments here still glow with mystery and magic."
  11. ^ Savage, Jon (1 November 2009). "Tricky:Maxinquaye". The Observer. Retrieved 5 November 2009. 
  12. ^ Spin (6/95, p.99) – 8 – Very Good – "...Imagine the cracked-out vibe of vintage Schoolly D generated by a black British outcast who loves Billie Holiday and PJ Harvey as much as he digs sluggish beats and singsong melodies....Their attitude is mean-spirited, but much of the aggression is directed inward..."
  13. ^ http://www.clashmusic.com/reviews/tricky-maxinquaye
  14. ^ "Tricky – Maxinquaye CD Album". Cduniverse.com. Retrieved 2012-03-01.