Methyl acetate

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Not to be confused with Menthyl acetate.
Methyl acetate[1]
Skeletal formula
Ball-and-stick model
Identifiers
CAS number 79-20-9 YesY
PubChem 6584
ChemSpider 6335 YesY
UNII W684QT396F YesY
KEGG C17530 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:77700 N
ChEMBL CHEMBL14079 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C3H6O2
Molar mass 74.08 g mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Odor Fragrant, fruity[2]
Density 0.932 g cm−3
Melting point −98 °C (−144 °F; 175 K)
Boiling point 56.9 °C (134.4 °F; 330.0 K)
Solubility in water ~25% (20 °C)
Refractive index (nD) 1.361
Hazards
MSDS External MSDS
NFPA 704
Flammability code 3: Liquids and solids that can be ignited under almost all ambient temperature conditions. Flash point between 23 and 38 °C (73 and 100 °F). E.g., gasoline) Health code 1: Exposure would cause irritation but only minor residual injury. E.g., turpentine Reactivity (yellow): no hazard code Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Flash point −9 °C (16 °F; 264 K)
Related compounds
Related esters Methyl formate
Ethyl acetate
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 N (verify) (what is: YesY/N?)
Infobox references

Methyl acetate, also known as MeOAc, acetic acid methyl ester or methyl ethanoate, is a carboxylate ester with the formula CH3COOCH3. It is a flammable liquid with a characteristically pleasant smell reminiscent of some glues and nail polish removers. Methyl acetate is occasionally used as a solvent, being weakly polar and lipophilic, but its close relative ethyl acetate is a more common solvent being less toxic and less soluble in water. Methyl acetate has a solubility of 25% in water at room temperature. At elevated temperature its solubility in water is much higher. Methyl acetate is not stable in the presence of strong aqueous bases or aqueous acids. Methyl acetate is not considered as a VOC.[3]

Preparation and reactions[edit]

Methyl acetate is produced industrially via the carbonylation of methanol as a byproduct of the production of acetic acid.[4] Methyl acetate also arises by esterification of acetic acid with methanol in the presence of strong acids such as sulfuric acid, this production process is famous because of Eastman Kodak's intensified process using a reactive distillation.

Reactions[edit]

In the presence of strong bases such as sodium hydroxide or strong acids such as hydrochloric acid or sulfuric acid it is hydrolyzed back into methanol and acetic acid, especially at elevated temperature. The conversion of methyl acetate back into its components, by an acid, is a first-order reaction with respect to the ester. The reaction of methyl acetate and a base, for example sodium hydroxide, is a second-order reaction with respect to both reactants.

Applications[edit]

A major use of methyl acetate is as a volatile low toxicity solvent in glues, paints, and nail polish removers.

Acetic anhydride is produced by carbonylation of methyl acetate in a process that was inspired by the Monsanto acetic acid synthesis.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Merck Index, 12th Edition, 6089.
  2. ^ CDC - NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
  3. ^ Zeno, W. Wicks, JR, Frank N. Jones, S. Peter Pappas, and Douglas A. Wicks (2007). Organic Coatings. Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley. ISBN 978-0-471-69806-7. 
  4. ^ Hosea Cheung, Robin S. Tanke, G. Paul Torrence “Acetic Acid” in Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry, 2002, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim. doi:10.1002/14356007.a01_045
  5. ^ Zoeller, J. R.; Agreda, V. H.; Cook, S. L.; Lafferty, N. L.; Polichnowski, S. W.; Pond, D. M. (1992). "Eastman Chemical Company Acetic Anhydride Process". Catalysis Today 13: 73–91. doi:10.1016/0920-5861(92)80188-S.