Salabhasana

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Salabhasana

Salabhasana, Shalabhasana (Sanskrit: शलभासन; IAST: Śalabhāsana), Locust Pose,[1] or Grasshopper Pose[2] is an asana.

Etymology[edit]

The name comes from the Sanskrit words "shalabh" meaning "grasshopper"

Description[edit]

It is back bend, or spine stretch, using the strength of the upper and middle back to lift the weight of the legs as high as possible from a starting position face down on the floor. It improves flexibility and coordination and increases strength and stamina.[3][4]

Cautions[edit]

Beginners may find that their shoulder and elbow flexibility is not sufficient to allow them to get the hands palm down right underneath the body.

Variations[edit]

Variations of this asana are:

  • Ardha Salabhasana (Half Locust Pose)[5][6]
  • Poorna Salabhasana (Full Locust Pose)[7]

In the Bikram style of yoga, the asana referred to as Salabhasana has three stages which follow one after the other.[citation needed] The asana of the same name in the Astanga style of yoga corresponds to stage three of the Bikram style asana.[citation needed]

Preparatory asanas[edit]

In several styles of yoga, including Bikram Yoga and Astanga Yoga, Salabhasana is commonly performed after Bhujangasana, a related asana working on a different part of the spine.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Yoga Journal - Locust Pose". Retrieved 2011-04-11. 
  2. ^ Yesudian, Selvarajan; Haich, Elisabeth (January 1953). Yoga and health. Harper. p. 139. Retrieved 11 April 2011. 
  3. ^ "Yoga Exercise - Locust Pose (Salabhasana)". www.abc-of-yoga.com. Retrieved 2008-11-29. 
  4. ^ Stiles, Mukunda (2000). Structural Yoga Therapy: Adapting to the Individual. Red Wheel. ISBN 1-57863-177-7. 
  5. ^ Pratap, Vijayendra (15 September 1997). Beginning Yoga. Tuttle Publishing. p. 26. ISBN 978-0-8048-2104-9. Retrieved 11 April 2011. 
  6. ^ Mohanty. Managing Common Musculoskeletal Conditions by Physiotherapy & Yoga. Jaypee Brothers Publishers. p. 15. ISBN 978-81-8448-357-4. Retrieved 11 April 2011. 
  7. ^ Active Interest Media, Inc. (August 1996). Yoga Journal. Active Interest Media, Inc. p. 14. ISSN 01910965. Retrieved 11 April 2011. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]