Shinnston, West Virginia

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Shinnston, West Virginia
City
Pike Street (U.S. Route 19) in downtown Shinnston in 2006
Pike Street (U.S. Route 19) in downtown Shinnston in 2006
Location of Shinnston, West Virginia
Location of Shinnston, West Virginia
Coordinates: 39°23′39″N 80°18′1″W / 39.39417°N 80.30028°W / 39.39417; -80.30028Coordinates: 39°23′39″N 80°18′1″W / 39.39417°N 80.30028°W / 39.39417; -80.30028
Country United States
State West Virginia
County Harrison
Government
 • Type Manager Plan
 • City Manager Debra Herndon
 • Mayor Sammy J. DeMarco
Area[1]
 • Total 1.73 sq mi (4.48 km2)
 • Land 1.73 sq mi (4.48 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 928 ft (283 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 2,201
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 2,195
 • Density 1,272.3/sq mi (491.2/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 26431
Area code(s) 304
FIPS code 54-73636[4]
GNIS feature ID 1555613[5]

Shinnston is a city and former coal town in Harrison County, West Virginia, United States, along the West Fork River. The population was 2,201 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

Shinnston is located at 39°23′39″N 80°18′1″W / 39.39417°N 80.30028°W / 39.39417; -80.30028 (39.394030, -80.300273).[6] in northern Harrison County

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.73 square miles (4.48 km2), all of it land.[1]

Transportation[edit]

Landmarks[edit]

  • The Levi Shinn log house, The Levi Shinn log house is the oldest standing structure in North Central West Virginia at over 229 years old. The house, which still stands today along US Route 19, is maintained by the Shinnston Historical Association and is sometimes open to the public.
  • Ferguson Memorial Park
  • West Fork River trail
  • Bice-Ferguson Memorial Museum
  • Clay District Veterans Memorial
  • Lincoln High School
  • Frontier Days Festival

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 2,201 people, 949 households, and 629 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,272.3 inhabitants per square mile (491.2 /km2). There were 1,087 housing units at an average density of 628.3 per square mile (242.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.7% White, 0.3% African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.1% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1% of the population.

There were 949 households of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.7% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.7% were non-families. 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.87.

The median age in the city was 43.1 years. 20.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25% were from 25 to 44; 29.3% were from 45 to 64; and 17.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.1% male and 51.9% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 2,295 people, 982 households, and 657 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,330.8 people per square mile (515.2/km²). There were 1,103 housing units at an average density of 639.6 per square mile (247.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.39% White, 0.26% African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.04% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.22% of the population.

There were 982 households out of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.4% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were non-families. 30.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.90. In the city the population was spread out with 20.9% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 24.0% from 25 to 44, 25.7% from 45 to 64, and 19.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 88.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $26,786, and the median income for a family was $38,207. Males had a median income of $29,609 versus $20,156 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,352. About 14.2% of families and 18.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 34.8% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

  • The settlement of Shinnston dates to the 1778 building of Levi Shinn's log house, whom the area was named after. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.[7]
  • In 1815, the town was laid out with three streets running parallel with the river and with four crossing streets running at right angles to them.
  • The town was incorporated in 1852 as Shinn's Town by an act of the Virginia Legislature, as West Virginia did not yet exist as an independent state, and Solomon S. Fleming was elected the first mayor.
  • A new charter was secured in 1877 and the Town's name changed to Shinnston.
  • In 1915, Shinnston's Charter provided for a Mayor-Council form of government. This model remained in place for over 70 years and in 1998 the citizens voted to revise the Charter and adopt a City Manager-Council form of local government. That model was implemented on July 1, 1998 and Shinnston now has its fourth City Manager.
  • In the its beginnings the town was built around both Grain Mills and Saw Mills. In its early the years the town saw the development of a tannery, wagon makers and undertaker, mercantile interests, a pottery, and a local newspaper.
  • The first Bank began in 1899.
  • The railroad came to Shinnston in 1890.
  • A trolley operated from 1906 to 1947.
  • The first church was organized in 1786 and met in various homes in the community until 1835, when the first church building was erected.
  • The first school was organized in 1813 with classes taught in a small log cabin. In 1860 a larger building was constructed for use as a town hall and academy. This venture became the first public school in 1865. The first grade school was created in 1895 and Shinnston High School was added to it in 1907. In 1978, Shinnston and Lumberport High Schools were combined to form Lincoln High School.
  • The Shinnston Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1998.[7]

Notable people[edit]

  • Lt Col Thomas Harris Mayfield was a member of the famed Tuskegee Airmen. He served during WW II as an administrative clerk and later became a pilot. Lt Col Mayfield passed away in New Jersey in Oct 2012.
  • Henry W. Bigler, a soldier in the U.S. Mormon Battalion, one of the first discoverers of gold in California in 1848.
  • Dick Brown, catcher in American Major League Baseball during the 1950s and 1960s.
  • Larry Brown, Major League Baseball infielder who played from 1963 to 1974.
  • John McKay, (USC Trojans football, 1960–75 and Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 1976–84) was not born in, but, grew up in Shinnston and graduated from Shinnston High School.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-24. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-24. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-26. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09.