The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas

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The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas
Flintstonesmov.jpg
North American release poster for The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas, designed by BLT Communications and illustrated by Drew Struzan
Directed by Brian Levant
Produced by Bruce Cohen
Written by Deborah Kaplan
Harry Elfont
Jim Cash
Jack Epps Jr.
Based on The Flintstones created 
by William Hanna and Joseph Barbera
Starring Mark Addy
Stephen Baldwin
Kristen Johnston
Jane Krakowski
Joan Collins
Thomas Gibson
Alan Cumming
Music by David Newman
Cinematography Jamie Anderson
Edited by Kent Beyda
Production
  company
Amblin Entertainment
Hanna-Barbera Productions
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s)
  • April 28, 2000 (2000-04-28)
Running time 90 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $83 million
Box office $59,468,275

The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas (also known as The Flintstones 2) is a 2000 American family-romantic comedy film and prequel to 1994's The Flintstones based on the 1960-66 cartoon series of the same name. Produced by Amblin Entertainment and Hanna-Barbera Productions and distributed by Universal Pictures, it is set before the events of the first film and featured very few of the original cast. Despite receiving slightly more positive reviews than the first film, Viva Rock Vegas bombed at the box office. Ann-Margret, who appeared as 'Ann-Margrock' in the original series, sings the theme song, which is a slightly rewritten version of the theme song from Viva Las Vegas.

Plot[edit]

Young bachelors and best friends, Fred Flintstone (Mark Addy) and Barney Rubble (Stephen Baldwin) want dates, and little green alien The Great Gazoo (Alan Cumming), exiled to Earth by his species, offers to help, although only they can see him. Meanwhile, Wilma Slaghoople (Kristen Johnston) wants a normal life and activities, like bowling, despite her controlling mother Pearl (Joan Collins) who wants her to marry smooth casino-owner Chip Rockefeller (Thomas Gibson). Wilma angrily runs away to Bronto King in Bedrock. Waitress Betty O'Shale (Jane Krakowski) mistakes her as "caveless", and offers to share her apartment, and gets her a job alongside.

Two customers named Fred and Barney are smitted with the waitresses and invite them to a carnival, with Fred dating Betty and Barney taking Wilma. Fred wins a carnival game and gets a prize of an egg which hatches into a baby dinosaur, whom he names "Dino", but does not really feel a connection with Betty, nor does Barney with Wilma, until both men switch dates. Wilma invites her new pals home to a birthday party for her dad Colonel Slaghoople (Harvey Korman) where all are shocked by her wealth. Fred intends to propose, but changes his mind after meeting Chip, who berates him for his low-level job at Slate & Company. Pearl dislikes the three new friends, but Colonel Slaghoople accepts them, glad Wilma is happy, and in private gives her a pearl necklace that once belonged to his mother. After the boys disgrace themselves at dinner, Wilma nevertheless proclaims her pride and leads them out.

Chip congratulates Fred on attracting Wilma and apologizes for his humilitation of Fred's job; inviting the four to his Rock Vegas resort as a peace offering. However, this is a plot by Chip to hope Fred gambles so Wilma dumps him, whereas Fred sees it as a chance to win big so he can impress Wilma with money like Chip's. Chip and his girlfriend Roxie (Alex Meneses) are visited by two gangsters named Big Rocko and Little Rocko to collect a lot of money owed by Chip, who claims his upcoming marriage to Wilma will get him access to the Slaghoople fortune, and the gangsters agree that it is creditable for the debt to be repaid. Gazoo witnesses the entire conversation. When Barney tries to keep Fred from high-stakes poker, Chip sends Roxie to seduce Barney for an escort to an All-You-Can Eat buffet.

Chip keeps Fred gambling to miss his dinner date with the others. Betty sees Barney wipe cream from Roxie's chest and misinterprets the move as a pass. Mick Jagged (Cumming) comforts the weeping girl, and they go on a date. Wilma breaks up with Fred over not spending any time with her. Chip warns her of burglaries, arranges that Fred loses everything, slips Wilma's pearls in Fred's pocket, then asks him to empty them. Hotel security arrests Fred for robbery. When Barney protests that Fred would do no such thing, Chip accuses Barney of obstruction of justice and his him arrested as well. Wilma goes back to Chip.

In prison, the men are visited by Gazoo, who earlier spied on Chip and reveals that Chip framed Fred for the robbery and plans to marry Wilma in order to get the Slaghooples' money. Barney slips through the bars, steals the keys, and unlocks the cell. Disguised as dancers, they accidentally run into Jagged's dressing room. Barney tells Betty he loves her, and they get back together.

Fred plans to disguise himself as Jagged in attempt to reconcile with Wilma. Meanwhile in the audience, Chip proposes to Wilma but she doesn't respond. Fred then comes on stage disguised as Jagged and sings to Wilma briefly. He apologises for his behaviour earlier, then proposes to her. Wilma happily accepts rejecting Chip, and they marry in the Rock Vegas Chapel of Love, while the gangsters murder Chip. After Pastor (John Stephenson) proclaims them man and wife, everyone sings "Meet the Flintstones". When Jagged sings "Viva Rock Vegas" at a party, Betty catches Wilma's tossed bouquet and kisses Barney. The newlyweds drive away to goodbye waves.

Cast[edit]

Reception[edit]

The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas received mostly negative reviews from critics at an average of 25% on Rotten Tomatoes and was nominated for four Razzies at the 21st Golden Raspberry Awards, for Worst Picture, Worst Supporting Actor (Stephen Baldwin), Worst Supporting Actress (Joan Collins), and Worst Remake or Sequel, and it "lost" in all four categories. It was also a box office flop, as it grossed $59,468,275 worldwide on an $83 million budget. This was an extreme disappointment compared to the first film's $358.5 million international gross.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "'U-571' Runs Noisy, Runs Strong". The Los Angeles Times. 2000-05-02. Retrieved 2010-11-10. 

External links[edit]