Timeline of San Antonio

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The Alamo in 1854.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of San Antonio, Texas, United States.

18th century[edit]

  • 1718 - San Antonio founded.[1]

19th century[edit]

  • 1845 - San Antonio becomes part of the new U.S. state of Texas.[4]
  • 1849 - Cholera epidemic.[2]
  • 1853 - Public schools established.[2]
  • 1860 - Population: 8,235.[6]
  • 1871 - Mount Zion Baptist Church founded.[9]
  • 1872 - Alamo Literary Society formed.[10]
  • 1875 - Sociedad Benevolencia Mexicana founded.[9]
  • 1877 - Railroad begins operating.[7]
  • 1881 - Evening Light newspaper begins publication.[8]
  • 1885
    • Scholz's Palm Garden in business.[9]
    • Alamo City Commercial College established.[13]
  • 1894 - Peacock Military College established.[13]
  • 1896
The Bexar County Courthouse around the turn of the 20th Century.

20th century[edit]

1900s-1940s[edit]

  • 1900 - Population: 53,321.[15]
  • 1910 - Population: 96,614.[15]
The Randolph Air Force Base Administration Building
  • 1930 - Population: 231,542.
  • 1938
    • Pecan-sheller labor strike.[20]
    • Ciculo Social Femenino Mexicano founded.[20]
  • 1948 - Sultanas de Bejar (women's group) formed.[14]

1950s-1990s[edit]

  • 1950
    • Free port[7] and Stock Show and Rodeo[19] established.
    • Population: 408,442.
The Tower of the Americas, the theme structure for Hemisfair '68
  • 1969 - Paseo Del Rio Association formed.[23]
  • 1970 - Population: 708,582.[4]

21st century[edit]

  • 2000
    • Bahá’í Center of San Antonio founded.[27]
    • Population: 1,144,646.[28]
  • 2008 - Spurs Community Garden created.[29]
  • 2010 - Area of city: 460.93 square miles.[31]
  • 2011 - Population: 1,359,758; metro 2,194,927.[32]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cordelia Candelaria, ed. (2004). "Chronology". Encyclopedia of Latino Popular Culture. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. lxiii–lxxii. ISBN 978-0-313-33210-4. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Federal Writers' Project (1938), "Condensed Chronology", San Antonio, American Guide Series, San Antonio, TX: Clegg Company 
  3. ^ William Corner (1890), San Antonio de Bexar, San Antonio, Tex: Bainbridge & Corner 
  4. ^ a b c d Ory Mazar Nergal, ed. (1980), "San Antonio, TX", Encyclopedia of American Cities, New York: E.P. Dutton, p. 302+, OL 4120668M 
  5. ^ a b c Mike Tigas and Sisi Wei (ed.). "San Antonio, Texas". Nonprofit Explorer. New York: ProPublica. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  6. ^ Adolph Wilhelm August Friedrich von Steinwehr (1874), "San Antonio", Centennial Gazetteer of the United States, Philadelphia: J.C. McCurdy & Company 
  7. ^ a b c d e Leon E. Seltzer, ed. (1952), Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World, New York: Columbia University Press, p. 1660, OL 6112221M 
  8. ^ a b "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b c d Judith Berg-Sobré (2003). San Antonio on Parade: Six Historic Festivals. Texas A&M University Press. ISBN 978-1-58544-222-5. 
  10. ^ Davies Project. "American Libraries before 1876". Princeton University. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  11. ^ William Campbell (1913). "Diocese of San Antonio". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York. 
  12. ^ "San Antonio, Texas". Encyclopedia of Southern Jewish Communities. Jackson, Mississippi: Goldring / Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  13. ^ a b Patterson's American Educational Directory 29. Chicago. 1932. 
  14. ^ a b University of Texas Libraries. "(San Antonio)". Texas Archival Resources Online. University of Texas at Austin. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  15. ^ a b "San Antonio", Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th ed.), New York: Encyclopaedia Britannica Co., 1910, OCLC 14782424 
  16. ^ American Library Annual, 1917-1918. New York: R.R. Bowker Co. 1918. 
  17. ^ a b c d American Association for State and Local History (2002). "Texas: San Antonio". Directory of Historical Organizations in the United States and Canada (15th ed.). p. 790+. ISBN 0759100020. 
  18. ^ a b "Movie Theaters in San Antonio, TX". CinemaTreasures.org. Los Angeles: Cinema Treasures LLC. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  19. ^ a b Char Miller, ed. (2001). On the Border: An Environmental History of San Antonio. University of Pittsburgh Press. ISBN 978-0-8229-7060-6. 
  20. ^ a b Vicki L. Ruiz and Virginia Sánchez Korrol, ed. (2006). Latinas in the United States: A Historical Encyclopedia. Indiana University Press. ISBN 0-253-11169-2. 
  21. ^ "Institution Directory". Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  22. ^ "Texas". Official Congressional Directory. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1963. 
  23. ^ Charles R. Porter (2009). Spanish Water, Anglo Water: Early Development in San Antonio. Texas A&M University Press. ISBN 978-1-60344-468-2. 
  24. ^ "Texas Food Banks". Food Bank Locator. Chicago: Feeding America. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  25. ^ "Texas". Official Congressional Directory. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1991–1992. 
  26. ^ "United States". Art Spaces Directory. New York: New Museum. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  27. ^ a b Pluralism Project. "San Antonio, Texas". Directory of Religious Centers. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  28. ^ "San Antonio (city), Texas". State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on March 28, 2009. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  29. ^ "San Antonio Food Bank". Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  30. ^ "Texas". CJR's Guide to Online News Startups. New York: Columbia Journalism Review. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  31. ^ "San Antonio (city), Texas". State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  32. ^ "30 Cities: An Introductory Snapshot". American Cities Project. Washington, DC: Pew Charitable Trusts. 2013. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  33. ^ Civic Impulse, LLC. "Members of Congress". GovTrack. Washington, D.C. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 

Further reading[edit]

Published in the 19th century[edit]

Published in the 20th century[edit]

  • George Pierce Garrison (1903), "Beginnings of San Antonio", Texas: a contest of civilizations, Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company 
  • Charles W. Ramsdell, San Antonio: A Historical and Pictorial Guide (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1959).
  • T. R. Fehrenbach, The San Antonio Story (Tulsa, Oklahoma: Continental Heritage Press, 1978)
  • Richard A. Garcia (1991), Rise of the Mexican American middle class: San Antonio, 1929-1941, Texas A&M University Press, ISBN 0890963681 
  • Jesús F. de la Teja (1995). San Antonio de Béxar: A Community on New Spain's Northern Frontier. University of New Mexico Press. 

Published in the 21st century[edit]

  • Rodolfo Rosales (2000). Illusion of Inclusion: The Political Story of San Antonio, Texas. University of Texas Press. ISBN 978-0-292-77103-1. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 29°25′00″N 98°30′00″W / 29.416667°N 98.5°W / 29.416667; -98.5