Screaming for Vengeance

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Screaming for Vengeance
Judas Priest SforV.jpg
Studio album by Judas Priest
Released 17 July 1982
Recorded January–May 1982
Studio Ibiza Sound Studios, Ibiza, Spain
Genre Heavy metal
Length 38:42
Label Columbia
Producer Tom Allom
Judas Priest chronology
Point of Entry
Screaming for Vengeance
Defenders of the Faith
Singles from Screaming for Vengeance
  1. "You've Got Another Thing Comin'"
    Released: August 1982
  2. "Chains"
    Released: October 1982

Screaming for Vengeance is the eighth studio album by British heavy metal band Judas Priest. The album, considered the band's commercial breakthrough, sold in excess of 5 million unit worldwide and has been certified double platinum in the United States and platinum in Canada. The album includes the hit single "You've Got Another Thing Comin'", which became one of the band's signature songs and a perennial radio favourite.

Recording and release[edit]

Screaming for Vengeance was recorded at Ibiza Sound Studios, Ibiza, Spain (during this period, it was commonplace for UK-based musicians to record in continental Europe for tax purposes) and mixed at Beejay Recording Studios and Bayshore Recording Studios in Coconut Grove, Florida. Stylistically, Screaming for Vengeance showcased a harder, heavier sound than British Steel and saw the band quickly reverse direction back into straight heavy rock after the melodically styled direction of Point of Entry. The album also marks the first time a Priest drummer played on more than 2 Judas Priest albums, with Dave Holland having also played on British Steel and Point of Entry.

The album's most commercially successful track, the single "You've Got Another Thing Comin'", was a last-minute addition. According to guitarist K. K. Downing, "We were quite happy with the album, but decided late on that we could add one more song. I know we had some of the parts, but we set about completing "Another Thing Comin'" during the mixing sessions at Bee Jay studios. It came together quite quickly, and I seem to remember that we all had a good feeling about it, as it did sound like a good driving song and possibly a good radio track."[1] Rob Halford expressed surprise at the song's success, saying "that track was buried. Normally the tracks you think are going to do stuff are at the front end of the release. But our friends at Sony said, 'We're going to go for this song.' And we didn't really know what was going on. But then the feedback was coming over: 'Hey, the record's buzzing in this town and that town,' and it just took off."[2]

Screaming for Vengeance was released on 17 July 1982, with a remastered CD version released in May 2001. As of the album's 30th anniversary in 2012, it remains the top-selling release of Judas Priest's career.[1]


The Vengeance World Tour began shortly after the album's release in July 1982 and focused on North America during the summer and fall, Priest not performing in Europe until December 1983. This emphasis on US audiences was in order to establish a solid commercial foothold there, and in particular because "You've Got Another Thing Comin'" became a major hit. That and "Electric Eye" became live setlist staples and some of the band's most performed songs. "Devil's Child" has also been performed on various tours between 1982 and 2008. For comparison, the title track (which KK Downing described as "difficult to play in a live setting") was played only 38 times, none after 1984, and "Fever" was only played at the first two 1982 shows. The 30th-anniversary release of the album in 2012 came with a DVD of a live show recorded in May 1983 at the US Festival in California on the last date of the Screaming For Vengeance Tour. During the US tour to support the album in 1982, Judas Priest were supported by bands such as Iron Maiden, Krokus, and Uriah Heep.[citation needed]


Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 4/5 stars[3]
Blogcritics favourable (30th Ann.)[4]
Decibel (mixed)[5]
Metal Storm 10/10[6]
PopMatters 7/10 stars (30th Ann.)[7]
Martin Popoff 9/10 stars[8]
Sputnikmusic 3.5/5[9]
Terrorizer 5/5 (30th Ann.)[10]

While 1980's British Steel has been referred to as the band's masterpiece,[11] Screaming for Vengeance was Judas Priest's breakthrough in North America. Although all Judas Priest's albums since 1977's Sin After Sin were certified Gold by the RIAA and the band had achieved a cult following among American audiences by 1979 and could headline their own tours, they sold "relatively few" records there before Screaming for Vengeance. It was also extremely successful worldwide.

Commercial performance[edit]

Screaming for Vengeance reached No. 11 on the UK Albums Chart and No. 17 on the US Billboard 200 Pop Albums. It was certified gold by the RIAA on 29 October 1982, platinum on 18 April 1983, and 2× platinum on 16 October 2001,[12] being the band's first album to achieve the two latter awards.


The album ranked 15th on IGN's 25 most influential metal albums. Screaming for Vengeance also came 10th on's 100 greatest metal albums. Kerrang! listed the album at No. 46 among the "100 Greatest Heavy Metal Albums of All Time". The accolades received throughout the years from various musicians within the rock field have further established its position as one of the most influential heavy metal albums of all time.

In popular culture[edit]

This album was the first entire album released as downloadable content for the video games Rock Band and Rock Band 2.[13]

The title song "Screaming for Vengeance" was played on the main site for the video game Brütal Legend.[14] In the game, Rob Halford voices a villain named General Lionwhyte, as well as a heroic character called the Fire Baron, modeled after his likeness. The track "You've Got Another Thing Comin'" was featured in the 2002 video game Grand Theft Auto: Vice City as part of the VRock radio station. The song "Riding on the Wind" was featured in the 2012 video game Twisted Metal.

Track listing[edit]

All songs written and composed by Glenn Tipton, Rob Halford and K.K. Downing, except where noted. 

Side one
No. Title Length
1. "The Hellion" (Instrumental) 0:41
2. "Electric Eye"   3:39
3. "Riding on the Wind"   3:07
4. "Bloodstone"   3:51
5. "(Take These) Chains" (Bob Halligan, Jr.) 3:07
6. "Pain and Pleasure"   4:17
Side two
No. Title Length
7. "Screaming for Vengeance"   4:43
8. "You've Got Another Thing Comin'"   5:09
9. "Fever"   5:20
10. "Devil's Child"   4:48

30th Anniversary Bonus Live DVD[edit]

All songs written and composed by Glenn Tipton, Rob Halford and K.K. Downing, except where noted. All tracks were filmed and recorded at the second US Festival, Devore, San Bernardino, California, 29 May 1983. One track from the set was cut because of audio problems with the source material.. 

No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. "Electric Eye"      
2. "Riding on the Wind"      
3. "Heading Out to the Highway"      
4. "Bloodstone"      
5. "Metal Gods"      
6. "Breaking the Law"      
7. "Diamonds and Rust" (Joan Baez cover) Joan Baez  
8. "Victim of Changes"   Al Atkins, Tipton, Halford, Downing  
9. "Living After Midnight"      
10. "The Green Manalishi (With the Two-Pronged Crown)" (Fleetwood Mac cover) Peter Green  
11. "Screaming for Vengeance"      
12. "You've Got Another Thing Comin'"      
13. "Hell Bent for Leather"      


Judas Priest
  • Produced by Tom Allom
  • Engineered by Louis Austin
  • Cover design by John Berg, based on a concept by Judas Priest
  • Artwork by Doug Johnson
  • Photography by Steve Joester


Chart (1982–2012) Peak
Australian Albums (Kent Music Report)[16] 81
Belgian Albums (Ultratop Flanders)[17] 173
Belgian Albums (Ultratop Wallonia)[18] 139
German Albums (Official Top 100)[19] 23
Norwegian Albums (VG-lista)[20] 26
Spanish Albums (PROMUSICAE)[21] 84
Swedish Albums (Sverigetopplistan)[22] 14
UK Albums (OCC)[23] 11
US Billboard 200[24] 17


Region Certification Sales/shipments
Canada (Music Canada)[25] Platinum 100,000^
United States (RIAA)[26] 2× Platinum 2,000,000^
Worldwide sales: 5,000,000

^shipments figures based on certification alone


  • Sepultura performed a cover of the title track "Screaming for Vengeance" on their Dante XXI album.
  • Iced Earth performed a cover of the title track "Screaming for Vengeance" on the tribute album Tribute to the Gods.
  • Stratovarius performed a cover of "Bloodstone" on the album Intermission.
  • Helloween performed a cover of "The Hellion/Electric Eye" on the single "The Time of the Oath". The cover also appears on the album Treasure Chest.
  • Godsmack covered a medley of "The Hellion/Electric Eye" for the VH1 Rock Honors.
  • Saxon performed a cover of "You've Got Another Thing Comin'" on a Judas Priest tribute album.
  • Virgin Steele also covered "Screaming for Vengeance". It can be found on the Legends of Metal Vol. II – A Tribute to Judas Priest album.
  • Benediction performed a cover of "The Hellion/Electric Eye" on the album Grind Bastard.
  • Jani Lane covered "Electric Eye" on a Judas Priest tribute album.
  • As I Lay Dying performed a cover of "The Hellion/Electric-Eye" on the compilation album Decas.
  • Fozzy covered "Riding on the Wind" on their debut album Fozzy.


  1. ^ a b Downing, K.K. (July 2012). "Hello to everyone!". Retrieved 18 May 2013. 
  2. ^ Hart, Josh (6 September 2012). "Interview: Rob Halford on the 30th Anniversary of Judas Priest's 'Screaming for Vengeance'". Guitar World. Retrieved 9 September 2015. 
  3. ^ Huey, Steve. "Screaming For Vengeance – Judas Priest". AllMusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  4. ^ Doherty, Charlie (28 September 2012). "Music Review: Judas Priest – 'Screaming for Vengeance' (Special 30th Anniversary Edition)". Blogcritics. Retrieved 10 September 2015. 
  5. ^ Begrand, Adrien (10 August 2011). "Disposable Heroes: Judas Priest's "Screaming for Vengeance"". Decibel. Retrieved 10 September 2015. 
  6. ^ Tombale, Pierre (15 December 2003). "Judas Priest - Screaming for Vengeance". Metal Storm. Retrieved 10 September 2015. 
  7. ^ Hayes, Craig (4 October 2012). "Judas Priest - Screaming for Vengeance (Special 30th Anniversary Deluxe Edition)". PopMatters. Retrieved 10 September 2015. 
  8. ^ Popoff, Martin (1 November 2005). The Collector's Guide to Heavy Metal: Volume 2: The Eighties. Burlington, Ontario, Canada: Collector's Guide Publishing. ISBN 978-1-894959-31-5. 
  9. ^ Stagno, Mike (4 September 2006). "Screaming For Vengeance – Judas Priest". Sputnikmusic. Retrieved 14 March 2012. 
  10. ^ Yardley, Miranda (6 September 2012). "Selected and Dissected: Judas Priest – ‘Screaming For Vengeance: 30th Anniversary Edition’. Reviewed". Terrorizer. Retrieved 10 September 2015. 
  11. ^ Robinson, Joe. "11 Classic Rock Artists That Shaped Heavy Metal". Ultimate Classic Rock. Retrieved 18 May 2013.  External link in |work= (help)
  12. ^ "American album certifications – Judas Priest – Screaming for Vengeance". Recording Industry Association of America.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH
  13. ^ "Full Albums Arrive as Rock Band DLC". Retrieved 18 April 2008. 
  14. ^ "Brutal Legend". Retrieved 19 January 2008. 
  15. ^ Screaming For Vengeance Special 30th Anniversary Edition, Retreieved 19 July 2012
  16. ^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. St Ives, New South Wales: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6. 
  17. ^ "Judas Priest – Screaming for Vengeance" (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Retrieved 23 March 2015.
  18. ^ "Judas Priest – Screaming for Vengeance" (in French). Hung Medien. Retrieved 23 March 2015.
  19. ^ "Judas Priest – Screaming for Vengeance". GfK Entertainment. Retrieved 23 March 2015.
  20. ^ "Judas Priest – Screaming for Vengeance". Hung Medien. Retrieved 23 March 2015.
  21. ^ "Judas Priest – Screaming for Vengeance". Hung Medien. Retrieved 23 March 2015.
  22. ^ "Judas Priest – Screaming for Vengeance". Hung Medien. Retrieved 23 March 2015.
  23. ^ "Judas Priest | Artist | Official Charts". UK Albums Chart Retrieved 23 March 2015.
  24. ^ "Judas Priest – Chart history" Billboard 200 for Judas Priest. Retrieved 23 March 2015.
  25. ^ "Canadian album certifications – Judas Priest – Screaming for Vengeance". Music Canada. 
  26. ^ "American album certifications – Judas Priest – Screaming for Vengeance". Recording Industry Association of America.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH

External links[edit]