1437 Diomedes

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1437 Diomedes
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Karl Wilhelm Reinmuth
Discovery date 3 August 1937
Designations
Named after
Diomedes
1937 PB
Jupiter trojan
Orbital characteristics[1][2]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 78.01 yr (28494 days)
Aphelion 5.4237 AU (811.37 Gm)
Perihelion 4.9654 AU (742.81 Gm)
5.1946 AU (777.10 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.044112
11.84 yr (4324.39 d)
13.10 km/s
183.828°
0° 4m 59.696s / day
Inclination 20.491°
315.792°
131.59°
Earth MOID 4.01036 AU (599.941 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 0.271727 AU (40.6498 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 2.872
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 164.3±4.1 km (IRAS)[1]
~ (284 × 126 × 65)[3]
Mean radius
82.155±2.05 km
24.49 h (1.020 d)
24.46 hr [1]
0.0313±0.002[1]
Temperature ~ 122 K
8.30 [1]

1437 Diomedes is a Jupiter trojan orbiting near the L4 Lagrangian point of the SunJupiter system, i.e. "Greek Camp". Based on IRAS data, Diomedes is 164 km in diameter, the third-largest Jupiter trojan.[4] It was discovered by Karl Wilhelm Reinmuth on 3 August 1937, in Heidelberg, Germany[1] and named after the Greek hero Diomedes

The largest Jupiter trojans
Trojan Diameter (km)
624 Hektor 225
911 Agamemnon 167
1437 Diomedes 164
1172 Äneas 143
617 Patroclus 141
588 Achilles 135
1173 Anchises 126
1143 Odysseus 126
Source: JPL Small-Body Database, IRAS data

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1437 Diomedes (1937 PB)" (2008-01-18 last obs). Retrieved 27 April 2016. 
  2. ^ "The Asteroid Orbital Elements Database". astorb. Lowell Observatory. 
  3. ^ Sato, Isao; Šarounová, Lenka; Fukushima, Hideo (2000). "Size and Shape of Trojan Asteroid Diomedes from Its Occultation and Photometry". Icarus 145 (1): 25–32. Bibcode:2000Icar..145...25S. doi:10.1006/icar.1999.6316. 
  4. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: orbital class (TJN) and diameter > 50 (km)". JPL's Solar System Dynamics Group. Retrieved 2012-03-28. 

External links[edit]