2363 Cebriones

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2363 Cebriones
Discovery[1]
Discovery site Purple Mountain Observatory
Discovery date 4 October 1977
Designations
MPC designation (2363) Cebriones
Named after
Kebriones
1977 TJ3
Jupiter Trojan [2]
Orbital characteristics[3][2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 62.57 yr (22852 days)
Aphelion 5.3827 AU (805.24 Gm)
Perihelion 5.0150 AU (750.23 Gm)
5.19885 AU (777.737 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.035368
11.85 yr (4329.71 d)
211.004°
0° 4m 59.326s / day
Inclination 32.134°
211.755°
56.541°
Earth MOID 4.05937 AU (607.273 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 0.333156 AU (49.8394 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 2.693
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 81.84 kilometres (50.85 mi) ± 5.1 kilometres (3.2 mi)
Mean diameter[4]
Mean radius
40.92 ± 2.55 km
20.081 ± 0.001 hours [5]
0.0599 ± 0.008 [4]
9.11,[6][2]

2363 Cebriones (1977 TJ3) is a Jupiter Trojan discovered on 4 October 1977 at Purple Mountain Observatory.[1] This asteroid is named for Cebriones the charioteer of Hector.[7]

Photometric observations of this asteroid during 1994 were used to build a light curve showing a rotation period of 20.05 ± 0.04 hours with a brightness variation of 0.22 ± 0.01 magnitude.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Discovery Circumstances: Numbered Minor Planets (1)-(5000)". IAU: Minor Planet Center. Retrieved December 17, 2008. 
  2. ^ a b c "2363 Cebriones (1977 TJ3)". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 15 April 2016. 
  3. ^ "(2363) Cebriones". AstDyS. Italy: University of Pisa. Retrieved December 17, 2008. 
  4. ^ a b Tedesco, Edward F.; Noah, Paul V.; Noah, Meg; Price, Stephan D. (2004). "Supplemental IRAS Minor Planet Survey (SIMPS)". IRAS-A-FPA-3-RDR-IMPS-V6.0. Planetary Data System. Retrieved 2014-05-15. 
  5. ^ Galád, Adrián; Kornoš, Leonard (2008). "A Collection of Lightcurves from Modra: 2007 December- 2008 June". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 35 (4): 144–146. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35..144G. 
  6. ^ Tholen, David J., ed. (2007). "Asteroid Absolute Magnitudes and Slopes". EAR-A-5-DDR-ASTERMAG-V12.0. Planetary Data System. Archived from the original on June 17, 2012. Retrieved 2014-05-15. 
  7. ^ Schmadel, Lutz (2003). Dictionary of minor planet names (fifth ed.). Germany: Springer. p. 192. ISBN 3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 2008-12-28. 
  8. ^ Mottola, Stefano; Di Martino, Mario; Erikson, Anders; Gonano-Beurer, Maria; Carbognani, Albino; Carsenty, Uri; Hahn, Gerhard; Schober, Hans-Josef; Lahulla, Felix; Delbò, Marco; Lagerkvist, Claes-Ingvar (May 2011). "Rotational Properties of Jupiter Trojans. I. Light Curves of 80 Objects". The Astronomical Journal. 141 (5): 170. Bibcode:2011AJ....141..170M. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/141/5/170. 

External links[edit]