1995 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships

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1995 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships
Tournament details
Host country Sweden
Dates23 April – 7 May
Teams12
Venue(s)(in 2 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank.svg Finland (1st title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank.svg Sweden
Third place Bronze medal blank.svg Canada
Fourth place Czech Republic
Tournament statistics
Matches played40
Goals scored229 (5.73 per match)
Attendance326,571 (8,164 per match)
Scoring leader(s)Canada Andrew McKim 14 points
1994
1996

The 1995 Men's World Ice Hockey Championships was played in Stockholm and Gävle Sweden, from 23 April to 7 May 1995. In the tournament finals, Finland won the gold medal by winning over Sweden 4–1 at the Globen arena in Stockholm. The Finnish goals were scored by Timo Jutila and Ville Peltonen, who scored a hat trick.

The gold medal was the first in Finland's history. Sweden had written a fight song, "Den glider in", which also was intended to be the official song of the championships. After the finals, the song became very popular in Finland.[1]

Because of the 1994–95 NHL lockout, it originally created a dream scenario for the tournament hosts. With a cancelled NHL season, all NHL players free from injuries would have been available.[2] But when the NHL season began in late January 1995, it instead created a scenario where fewer NHL players than usual became available. The Canadian and American teams would logically be hit the hardest, but the Americans found a way to lead their group in the first round. The Canadians, who struggled in the early tournament, beat the Americans in the quarter-finals, took the Swedes to overtime before losing, and then beat the Czechs for the bronze. Andrew McKim, playing in the minors for the Adirondack Red Wings ended up being the tournament scoring leader.[3][4]

World Championship Group A (Sweden)[edit]

Locations[edit]

Globen
Capacity: 13 850
Gavlerinken
Capacity: 8 265
Globen Gavlerinken
Sweden Stockholm Sweden Gävle

First round[edit]

Group 1[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  Russia 5 5 0 0 26–10 10
2  Italy 5 3 1 1 14–11 7
3  France 5 3 0 2 14–11 6
4  Canada 5 2 1 2 17–16 5
5  Germany 5 1 0 4 11–20 2
6   Switzerland 5 0 0 5 10–24 0
23 AprilFrance 4–0
(2–0, 1–0, 1–1)
 GermanyGävle
Attendance: 3,167
23 AprilRussia 4–2
(1–0, 0–0, 3–2)
 ItalyGävle
24 AprilGermany 1–2
(0–0, 1–1, 0–1)
 ItalyGävle
Attendance: 2,696
24 AprilSwitzerland  3–5
(1–3, 2–0, 0–2)
 CanadaGävle
Attendance: 2,909
25 AprilCanada 1–4
(1–3, 0–1, 0–0)
 FranceGävle
25 AprilRussia 8–0
(0–0, 5–0, 3–0)
  SwitzerlandGävle
Attendance: 3,442
26 AprilFrance 1–3
(0–1, 0–1, 1–1)
 RussiaGävle
Attendance: 3,040
27 AprilCanada 5–2
(1–1, 1–0, 3–1)
 GermanyGävle
Attendance: 4,358
27 AprilItaly 3–2
(0–1, 1–1, 2–1)
  SwitzerlandGävle
Attendance: 3,956
28 AprilGermany 3–6
(1–0, 1–5, 1–1)
 RussiaGävle
Attendance: 3,810
28 AprilSwitzerland  2–3
(0–1, 1–1, 1–1)
 FranceGävle
Attendance: 3,684
29 AprilCanada 2–2
(1–0, 0–0, 1–2)
 ItalyGävle
Attendance: 4,962
30 AprilGermany 5–3
(1–0, 2–1, 2–2)
  SwitzerlandGävle
Attendance: 6,293
30 AprilRussia 5–4
(2–1, 1–1, 2–2)
 CanadaGävle
Attendance: 6,293
1 MayItaly 5–2
(1–0, 2–0, 2–2)
 FranceGävle
Attendance: 2,700

Group 2[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  United States 5 3 2 0 17–11 8
2  Finland 5 3 1 1 22–14 7
3  Sweden 5 3 1 1 17–9 7
4  Czech Republic 5 3 0 2 14–9 6
5  Norway 5 1 0 4 9–18 2
6  Austria 5 0 0 5 9–27 0
23 AprilSweden 5–0
(0–0, 2–0, 3–0)
 NorwayStockholm
Attendance: 11,854
23 AprilFinland 0–3
(0–1, 0–0, 0–2)
 Czech RepublicStockholm
Attendance: 11,462
24 AprilAustria 2–5
(1–3, 0–1, 1–1)
 United StatesStockholm
Attendance: 6,817
25 AprilUnited States 2–1
(2–0, 0–0, 0–1)
 NorwayStockholm
25 AprilSweden 3–6
(1–0, 2–3, 0–3)
 FinlandStockholm
Attendance: 13,850
26 AprilCzech Republic 5–2
(3–0, 0–2, 2–0)
 AustriaStockholm
Attendance: 6,531
26 AprilNorway 2–5
(0–1, 0–2, 2–2)
 FinlandStockholm
Attendance: 7,842
27 AprilCzech Republic 2–4
(0–0, 0–2, 2–2)
 United StatesStockholm
Attendance: 7,452
27 AprilAustria 0–5
(0–1, 0–1, 0–3)
 SwedenStockholm
28 AprilUnited States 2–2
(1-2, 0–0, 1–0)
 SwedenStockholm
Attendance: 13,850
29 AprilFinland 7–2
(4–1, 3–0, 0–1)
 AustriaStockholm
Attendance: 10,438
29 AprilCzech Republic 3–1
(1–0, 1–1, 1–0)
 NorwayStockholm
Attendance: 8,864
30 AprilUnited States 4–4
(1–0, 3–1, 0–3)
 FinlandStockholm
Attendance: 13,850
30 AprilSweden 2–1
(0–1, 2–0, 0–0)
 Czech RepublicStockholm
Attendance: 13,850
1 MayNorway 5–3
(1–1, 4–2, 0–0)
 AustriaStockholm
Attendance: 7,347

Consolation round 11–12 place[edit]

2 MayAustria 4–0
(1–0, 3–0, 0–0)
  SwitzerlandGävle
Attendance: 2,968
4 MaySwitzerland  4–4
(1–2, 1–1, 2–1)
 AustriaStockholm
Attendance: 7,418

Switzerland was relegated to Group B.

Playoff round[edit]

Quarterfinals[edit]

2 MayItaly 0–7
(0–2, 0–3, 0–2)
 SwedenStockholm
Attendance: 13,850
2 MayFinland 5–0
(0–0, 4–0, 1–0)
 FranceStockholm
Attendance: 13,118
3 MayRussia 0–2
(0–1, 0–0, 0–1)
 Czech RepublicStockholm
Attendance: 11,772
3 MayUnited States 1–4
(0–2, 0–1, 1–1)
 CanadaStockholm
Attendance: 13,850

Semifinals[edit]

5 MaySweden 3–2 (OT)
(0–0, 1–1, 1–1, 1–0)
 CanadaStockholm
Attendance: 13,850
5 MayCzech Republic 0–3
(0–1, 0–0, 0–2)
 FinlandStockholm
Attendance: 12,853

Match for third place[edit]

6 MayCanada 4–1
(1–1, 2–0, 1–0)
 Czech RepublicStockholm
Attendance: 12,175

Final[edit]

Time is local (UTC+2).

7 May
15:00
Finland 4–1
(1–0, 2–0, 1–1)
 SwedenStockholm
Attendance: 13,850

World Championship Group B (Slovakia)[edit]

Played in Bratislava, 12–21 April. The hosts bettered their Group C record of the previous year, this time winning all their games. Thirty-eight-year-old Peter Stastny led the tournament in scoring.[3]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
13  Slovakia 7 7 0 0 60–15 14
14  Latvia 7 6 0 1 65–16 12
15  Poland 7 4 0 3 29–30 8
16  Netherlands 7 3 0 4 20–38 6
17  Denmark 7 3 0 4 30–28 6
18  Japan 7 2 0 5 26–45 4
19  Great Britain 7 2 0 5 19–35 4
20  Romania 7 1 0 6 15–57 2

Slovakia was promoted to Group A while Romania was relegated to Group C.

12 AprilLatvia 18–1 Romania
12 AprilSlovakia 7–3 Great Britain
12 AprilPoland 8–1 Netherlands
12 AprilJapan 1–5 Denmark
13 AprilRomania 2–0 Great Britain
13 AprilSlovakia 9–3 Japan
13 AprilNetherlands 1–6 Latvia
13 AprilDenmark 1–3 Poland
15 AprilGreat Britain 3–2 Netherlands
15 AprilJapan 8–2 Romania
15 AprilSlovakia 10–0 Poland
15 AprilLatvia 9–2 Denmark
16 AprilRomania 3–6 Poland
16 AprilNetherlands 4–3 Japan
16 AprilSlovakia 4–3 Latvia
16 AprilDenmark 9–2 Great Britain
18 AprilLatvia 6–2 Poland
18 AprilNetherlands 5–3 Romania
18 AprilSlovakia 6–2 Denmark
18 AprilGreat Britain 3–4 Japan
19 AprilRomania 4–9 Denmark
19 AprilJapan 2–15 Latvia
19 AprilSlovakia 13–4 Netherlands
19 AprilPoland 3–4 Great Britain
21 AprilDenmark 2–3 Netherlands
21 AprilPoland 7–5 Japan
21 AprilGreat Britain 4–8 Latvia
21 AprilSlovakia 11–0 Romania

World Championship Group C1 (Bulgaria)[edit]

Played in Sofia 20–26 March. Nine teams took part this year because Yugoslavia was given the right to return to the group that they had last played in as the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. The consequence was that two teams were relegated.[3] They played in three groups of three where the first place teams contested promotion and the third place teams contested relegation. Two years after failing to qualify for Group C, Belarus got a rematch against Ukraine and Kazakhstan, this time coming out on top.

First round[edit]

Group 1[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  Kazakhstan 2 2 0 0 20–1 4
2  China 2 1 0 1 4–14 2
3  Bulgaria 2 0 0 2 3–12 0
20 MarchBulgaria 2–4 China
21 MarchChina 0–12 Kazakhstan
22 MarchBulgaria 1–8 Kazakhstan

Group 2[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  Belarus 2 2 0 0 11–5 4
2  Estonia 2 1 0 1 7–9 2
3  Slovenia 2 0 0 2 7–11 0
20 MarchEstonia 1–6 Belarus
21 MarchBelarus 5–4 Slovenia
22 MarchSlovenia 3–6 Estonia

Group 3[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  Ukraine 2 2 0 0 24–4 4
2  Hungary 2 1 0 1 10–10 2
3  Yugoslavia 2 0 0 2 4–24 0
20 MarchYugoslavia 3–15 Ukraine
21 MarchUkraine 9–1 Hungary
22 MarchHungary 9–1 Yugoslavia

Final round 21–23 place[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
21  Belarus 2 2 0 0 5–2 4
22  Kazakhstan 2 0 1 1 3–4 1
23  Ukraine 2 0 1 1 3–5 1

Belarus was promoted to Group B.

24 MarchUkraine 2–2 Kazakhstan
25 MarchBelarus 3–1 Ukraine
26 MarchKazakhstan 1–2 Belarus

Consolation round 24–26 place[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
24  Estonia 2 2 0 0 15–7 4
25  China 2 1 0 1 9–12 2
26  Hungary 2 0 0 2 5–10 0
24 MarchHungary 3–4 China
25 MarchEstonia 6–2 Hungary
26 MarchChina 5–9 Estonia

Consolation round 27–29 place[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
27  Slovenia 2 2 0 0 21–4 4
28  Yugoslavia 2 1 0 1 9–7 2
29  Bulgaria 2 0 0 2 1–20 0

Both Yugoslavia and Bulgaria were relegated to group C2.

24 MarchYugoslavia 6–0 Bulgaria
25 MarchSlovenia 7–3 Yugoslavia
26 MarchBulgaria 1–14 Slovenia

World Championship Group C2 (South Africa)[edit]

Played in Johannesburg and Krugersdorp in South Africa from 21–30 March. Two groups of five played round robins where the top two from each contested promotion. The bottom five teams were relegated to qualification tournaments for 1996 Group D. Belgian player Joris Peusens was only fifteen years old.

First round[edit]

Group 1[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  Lithuania 4 4 0 0 40–8 8
2  Spain 4 3 0 1 32–8 6
3  Belgium 4 1 1 2 18–19 3
4  Australia 4 1 0 3 16–24 2
5  Greece 4 0 1 3 9–56 1

Greece was relegated to Group D qualification.

21 MarchBelgium 5–5 Greece
21 MarchSpain 3–4 Lithuania
22 MarchGreece 1–21 Spain
22 MarchBelgium 10–2 Australia
24 MarchLithuania 8–2 Belgium
24 MarchGreece 2–10 Australia
26 MarchLithuania 20–1 Greece
26 MarchAustralia 2–4 Spain
27 MarchAustralia 2–8 Lithuania
27 MarchSpain 4–1 Belgium

Group 2[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
1  Croatia 4 4 0 0 41–11 8
2  South Korea 4 3 0 1 37–7 6
3  Israel 4 2 0 2 23–15 4
4  South Africa 4 1 0 3 7–29 2
5  New Zealand 4 0 0 4 7–53 0

New Zealand was relegated to Group D qualification.

21 MarchCroatia 19–5 New Zealand
21 MarchSouth Africa 2–8 South Korea
22 MarchCroatia 7–2 Israel
22 MarchNew Zealand 0–13 South Korea
24 MarchNew Zealand 0–12 Israel
24 MarchSouth Africa 1–11 Croatia
26 MarchSouth Korea 7–1 Israel
26 MarchSouth Africa 3–2 New Zealand
27 MarchSouth Korea 3–4 Croatia
27 MarchSouth Africa 1–8 Israel

Final round 30–33 place[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
30  Croatia 3 2 1 0 13–9 5
31  Lithuania 3 2 1 0 12–8 5
32  Spain 3 1 0 2 13–15 2
33  South Korea 3 0 0 3 10–16 0

Croatia only needed to tie Lithuania in their final game to earn promotion to Group C1, and they did so.

29 MarchLithuania 5–2 South Korea
29 MarchCroatia 6–3 Spain
30 MarchSpain 7–5 South Korea
30 MarchLithuania 3–3 Croatia

Consolation round 34–37 place[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
34  Belgium 3 2 0 1 22–10 4
35  Israel 3 2 0 1 16–8 4
36  Australia 3 2 0 1 17–17 4
37  South Africa 3 0 0 3 8–28 0

Israel, Australia, and South Africa, all were relegated to Group D qualification.

29 MarchSouth Africa 1–10 Belgium
29 MarchAustralia 5–1 Israel
30 MarchSouth Africa 6–10 Australia
30 MarchBelgium 2–7 Israel

Consolation round 38–39 place[edit]

Team Games Won Drawn Lost Points difference Points
38  Greece 1 1 0 0 10–7 2
39  New Zealand 1 0 0 1 7–10 0
30 MarchGreece 10–7 New Zealand

Ranking and statistics[edit]

 


 1995 IIHF World Championship Winners 

Finland
1st title

Tournament Awards[edit]

Final standings[edit]

The final standings of the tournament according to IIHF:

Gold medal icon.svg  Finland
Silver medal icon.svg  Sweden
Bronze medal icon.svg  Canada
4  Czech Republic
5  Russia
6  United States
7  Italy
8  France
9  Germany
10  Norway
11  Austria
12   Switzerland

Scoring leaders[edit]

List shows the top skaters sorted by points, then goals.

Player GP G A Pts +/− PIM POS
Canada Andrew McKim 8 6 7 13 +1 4 F
Finland Ville Peltonen 8 6 5 11 +12 4 F
Finland Saku Koivu 8 5 5 10 +9 18 F
Sweden Andreas Johansson 8 3 6 9 +6 8 F
Sweden Mikael Johansson 8 3 6 9 +7 4 F
Canada Iain Fraser 8 2 7 9 +4 8 F
Russia Sergei Berezin 6 7 1 8 +5 4 F
United States Jon Morris 6 3 5 8 +10 4 F
France Christian Pouget 6 2 6 8 +5 4 F
Finland Raimo Helminen 8 1 7 8 +11 2 F

Source: [1]

Leading goaltenders[edit]

Only the top five goaltenders, based on save percentage, who have played 50% of their team's minutes are included in this list.

Player MIP GA GAA SVS% SO
Czech Republic Roman Turek 359 9 1.50 .939 2
United States Pat Jablonski 360 15 2.50 .923 0
Russia Alexei Cherviakov 180 5 1.67 .923 1
France Petri Ylönen 300 11 2.20 .921 1
Finland Jarmo Myllys 420 12 1.71 .917 3

Source: [2]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "Den glider in" performed with Swedish national team on stage
  2. ^ "Sportåret 1995" (in Swedish). Dagens nyheter. 2 January 1995. Retrieved 2 March 2015.
  3. ^ a b c Summary at Passionhockey.com
  4. ^ Duplacey page 508

References[edit]

  • Complete results
  • Duplacey, James (1998). Total Hockey: The official encyclopedia of the National Hockey League. Total Sports. pp. 498–528. ISBN 0-8362-7114-9.
  • Podnieks, Andrew (2010). IIHF Media Guide & Record Book 2011. Moydart Press. pp. 158–9.

See also[edit]