24th World Science Fiction Convention

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Tricon, the 24th World Science Fiction Convention
Genre Science fiction
Venue Sheraton Cleveland
Location(s) Cleveland, Ohio
Country United States
Inaugurated September 1–5, 1966
Attendance 850
Filing status Non-profit

The 24th World Science Fiction Convention, also known as Tricon, was held 1–5 September 1966 at the Sheraton-Cleveland in Cleveland, Ohio, United States. Officially, the convention was hosted by three cities in the region: Cincinnati, Cleveland, and Detroit, — hence the name "Tricon".

The three co-chairmen of that Worldcon each represented their city's fandom; they were Ben Jason of Cleveland, Howard DeVore of Detroit, and Lou Tabakow of Cincinnati. The guest of honor was L. Sprague de Camp and the toastmaster was Isaac Asimov. Total attendance at Tricon was approximately 850.[1] Of special note: At Tricon, Gene Roddenberry premiered both pilot episodes, "The Cage" and "Where No Man Has Gone Before", for his upcoming NBC TV series Star Trek.

Awards[edit]

The Hugo Awards, named after Hugo Gernsback, are presented every year for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year.[2] Results are based on the ballots submitted by members of the World Science Fiction Society.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lynch, Richard (March 29, 1996). "Chapter Eight: Worldcons of the 1960s". Fan History of the 1960s. Archived from the original on September 27, 2011. Retrieved September 30, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Hugo Award FAQ". The Hugo Awards. World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved September 7, 2011. 
  3. ^ "1966 Hugo Awards". The Hugo Awards. World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved July 20, 2012. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
23rd World Science Fiction Convention
Loncon II in London, UK (1965)
List of Worldcons
24th World Science Fiction Convention
in Cleveland, United States (1966)
Succeeded by
25th World Science Fiction Convention
Nycon 3 in New York, United States (1967)