30 BC

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Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
30 BC in various calendars
Gregorian calendar30 BC
XXIX BC
Ab urbe condita724
Ancient Egypt eraXXXIII dynasty, 294
- PharaohCleopatra VII, 22
Ancient Greek era187th Olympiad, year 3
Assyrian calendar4721
Balinese saka calendarN/A
Bengali calendar−622
Berber calendar921
Buddhist calendar515
Burmese calendar−667
Byzantine calendar5479–5480
Chinese calendar庚寅(Metal Tiger)
2667 or 2607
    — to —
辛卯年 (Metal Rabbit)
2668 or 2608
Coptic calendar−313 – −312
Discordian calendar1137
Ethiopian calendar−37 – −36
Hebrew calendar3731–3732
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat27–28
 - Shaka SamvatN/A
 - Kali Yuga3071–3072
Holocene calendar9971
Iranian calendar651 BP – 650 BP
Islamic calendar671 BH – 670 BH
Javanese calendarN/A
Julian calendar30 BC
XXIX BC
Korean calendar2304
Minguo calendar1941 before ROC
民前1941年
Nanakshahi calendar−1497
Seleucid era282/283 AG
Thai solar calendar513–514
Tibetan calendar阳金虎年
(male Iron-Tiger)
97 or −284 or −1056
    — to —
阴金兔年
(female Iron-Rabbit)
98 or −283 or −1055

Year 30 BC was either a common year starting on Wednesday, Thursday or Friday or a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Proleptic Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Octavian and Crassus (or, less frequently, year 724 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 30 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • Possible date of composition of the Tirukkuṛaḷ, attributed to Thiruvalluvar.
  • First possible date for the invention of the wheelbarrow in history; as the 5th century Book of the Later Han states that the wife of the once poor and youthful imperial censor Bao Xuan of the Chinese Han dynasty helped him push a lu che back to his village during their feeble wedding ceremony, around this year.


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]