716

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
716 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar716
DCCXVI
Ab urbe condita1469
Armenian calendar165
ԹՎ ՃԿԵ
Assyrian calendar5466
Balinese saka calendar637–638
Bengali calendar123
Berber calendar1666
Buddhist calendar1260
Burmese calendar78
Byzantine calendar6224–6225
Chinese calendar乙卯(Wood Rabbit)
3412 or 3352
    — to —
丙辰年 (Fire Dragon)
3413 or 3353
Coptic calendar432–433
Discordian calendar1882
Ethiopian calendar708–709
Hebrew calendar4476–4477
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat772–773
 - Shaka Samvat637–638
 - Kali Yuga3816–3817
Holocene calendar10716
Iranian calendar94–95
Islamic calendar97–98
Japanese calendarReiki 2
(霊亀2年)
Javanese calendar609–610
Julian calendar716
DCCXVI
Korean calendar3049
Minguo calendar1196 before ROC
民前1196年
Nanakshahi calendar−752
Seleucid era1027/1028 AG
Thai solar calendar1258–1259
Tibetan calendar阴木兔年
(female Wood-Rabbit)
842 or 461 or −311
    — to —
阳火龙年
(male Fire-Dragon)
843 or 462 or −310
Map of Frisia (modern Netherlands) in 716
Statue of Boniface (c. 675–754)

Year 716 (DCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 716 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Arabian Empire[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr (1991). "The Early Medieval Balkans". A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century. Chapter 3: "The Balkans in the Eighth Century". Tervel and Byzantium (p. 75). ISBN 978-0472-08149-3
  2. ^ Bede, p. 324, translated by Leo Sherley-Price
  3. ^ Provencal, Levi. Encyclopedia of Islam New Edition Vol. 1 A-B. (Leiden, Netherlands: E.J. Brill, 1960), p. 58
  4. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  5. ^ Book of Tang, Vol. 194-I