Bridge Hewick

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Bridge Hewick
Bridge Hewick is located in North Yorkshire
Bridge Hewick
Bridge Hewick
Bridge Hewick shown within North Yorkshire
OS grid reference SE338704
• London 190 mi (310 km) SSE
Civil parish
  • Bridge Hewick
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town RIPON
Postcode district HG4
Police North Yorkshire
Fire North Yorkshire
Ambulance Yorkshire
EU Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
54°07′44″N 1°29′03″W / 54.12884°N 1.48418°W / 54.12884; -1.48418Coordinates: 54°07′44″N 1°29′03″W / 54.12884°N 1.48418°W / 54.12884; -1.48418

Bridge Hewick is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. The village is situated on the River Ure, and approximately 2 miles (3 km) east of the market town of Ripon. The civil parish had a population of 51 according to the 2001 census.[citation needed] The population remained at less than 100 as at the 2011 Census. Details are included on the statistics of the civil parish of Copt Hewick.

B6265 road bridge over the River Ure at Bridge Hewick

According to A Dictionary of British Place Names, 'Bridge Hewick' could be derived from the Old English 'brycg' for "at the bridge", with 'heah+wic', meaning a "high or chief dairy-farm". Hewick is recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as "Heawic", in the Hallikeld Hundred of the West Riding of Yorkshire. Listed for the settlement are three ploughlands and a meadow of one acre. In 1066 the lord of Hewick was Ealdred, Archbishop of York; lordship in 1086, after the Conquest, was held by the following archbishop, Thomas of Bayeux, who was also Tenant-in-chief to King William.[1][2]

In 1837, Bridge Hewick population was 77.[3] In 1870–02 Bridge Hewick was a township of 867 acres (4 km2) in the civil parish of Ripon, with a population of 89 in 18 houses.[4] A chapel in Bridge Hewick was in 1826 described as "in ruins".[5]

The Bridge Hewick local public house is the Black-A-Moor Inn.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mills, Anthony David (2003); A Dictionary of British Place Names, p.237, Oxford University Press, revised edition (2011). ISBN 019960908X
  2. ^ "(Bridge) Hewick", Domesdaymap.co.uk. Retrieved 18 March 2015
  3. ^ Moule, Thomas (1837); The English Counties Delineated, Volume 2, p.467, reprint RareBooksClub.com (2012). ISBN 1130811395
  4. ^ "Bridge Hewick West Riding", A Vision of Britain through Time, quoting John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales (1870–02). Retrieved 18 March 2015
  5. ^ Urban, Sylvanus; The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, Volume 96, Part 2, July to December 1826, p.310, reprint BiblioLife: Nabu Press (2012). ISBN 1276628951
  6. ^ "The Black-A-Moor, Bridge Hewick", Geograph. Retrieved 18 March 2015

External links[edit]