First Sharif ministry

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
First Sharif ministry
Flag of Pakistan.svg
cabinet of Pakistan
Incumbent
Date formed9 November 1990
Date dissolved18 April 1993
People and organisations
Head of stateGhulam Ishaq Khan
Head of governmentNawaz Sharif
Total no. of ministers18
Member partyIslami Jamhoori Ittehad
Status in legislatureSimple majority
Opposition partyPakistan Peoples Party
History
Election(s)1990 general election
Outgoing election1993 general election
Incoming formationJatoi caretaker
Outgoing formationMazari caretaker
PredecessorFirst Bhutto
SuccessorSecond Bhutto

The first Sharif ministry under prime minister Nawaz Sharif was sworn into office on 9 November 1990,[1] after the nine-party Islami Jamhoori Ittehad (IJI) unanimously nominated him the government head.[2]

Cabinet[edit]

Sharif's 18-member cabinet was one of the smallest in the country's history, especially compared to the record 58-member cabinet of his ousted predecessor Benazir Bhutto. Sharif insisted on bringing nearly a dozen politicians with links to Gen Zia-ul-Haq.[1]

Amongst the 18 members initially selected for the cabinet, nine were from Punjab, two from the Islamabad Capital Territory, six from Sindh and one from Balochistan. The cabinet was later expanded to include representation from the North-West Frontier Province[3] Although being a member of the IJI alliance, the Jamaat-e-Islami (JI) members declined to participate in Nawaz Sharif’s cabinet.[4]

Ministry[1][5] Minister
Prime Minister, Ministry of Defence Nawaz Sharif
Ministry of Foreign Affairs Sahabzada Yaqub Khan
Ministry of Finance Shazia Mahfooz
Ministry of Industry, Ministry of Interior Chaudhry Shujaat Hussain
Minister of State for Defence Syed Ghous Ali Shah
Ministry of Law Syed Fakhar Imam

Changes[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Times Wire Services (11 November 1990). "New Pakistan Cabinet Shows Links to Zia". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 13 July 2014.
  2. ^ Reuters (2 November 1990). "9-Party Coalition Picks Ex-Punjab Leader to Be Pakistan's Next Premier". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 13 July 2014.
  3. ^ Blood 1995, p. 231
  4. ^ "Interview with Qazi Hussain", Takbir, p. 26, 31 January 1991 in Nasr 1995 – "Qazi Hussain [had asserted] that no concrete offers were forthcoming from the new government either."
  5. ^ a b c d e f "Pakistan: Ministries, etc". List of rulers by country. Rulers. Retrieved 14 July 2014.

References[edit]