German submarine U-183

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
History
Nazi Germany
Name: U-183
Ordered: 15 August 1940
Builder: DeSchiMAG AG Weser, Bremen
Yard number: 1023
Laid down: 28 May 1941
Launched: 9 January 1942
Commissioned: 1 April 1942
Fate: Sunk, 23 April 1945, by a US submarine
General characteristics
Class and type: Type IXC/40 submarine
Displacement:
  • 1,144 t (1,126 long tons) surfaced
  • 1,257 t (1,237 long tons) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 6.86 m (22 ft 6 in) o/a
  • 4.44 m (14 ft 7 in) pressure hull
Height: 9.60 m (31 ft 6 in)
Draught: 4.67 m (15 ft 4 in)
Installed power:
  • 4,400 PS (3,200 kW; 4,300 bhp) (diesels)
  • 1,000 PS (740 kW; 990 shp) (electric)
Propulsion:
Range:
  • 13,850 nmi (25,650 km; 15,940 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) surfaced
  • 63 nmi (117 km; 72 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth: 230 m (750 ft)
Complement: 4 officers, 44 enlisted
Armament:
Service record
Part of:
Commanders:
  • K.Kapt. Heinrich Schäfer
  • April 1942 – November 1943
  • Kptlt. Fritz Schneewind
  • November 1943 – April 1945
Victories:
  • Four ships totalling 19,260 GRT sunk;
  • one ship of 6,993 GRT damaged beyond repair

German submarine U-183 was a Type IXC/40 U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine built during World War II. She was commissioned in April 1942, one of the first IXC/40 boats, somewhat larger and faster than the IXC type. She began her service life in the 4th U-boat Flotilla, a training organization, moving on to the 2nd, then the 33rd Flotilla, both operational or front outfits.

U-183 was in the first wave of "Monsun boats" or Monsun Gruppe, which operated in the Indian Ocean from Japanese bases in the occupied Dutch East Indies and British Malaya, mostly Penang.

Design[edit]

German Type IXC/40 submarines were slightly larger than the original Type IXCs. U-183 had a displacement of 1,144 tonnes (1,126 long tons) when at the surface and 1,257 tonnes (1,237 long tons) while submerged.[1] The U-boat had a total length of 76.76 m (251 ft 10 in), a pressure hull length of 58.75 m (192 ft 9 in), a beam of 6.86 m (22 ft 6 in), a height of 9.60 m (31 ft 6 in), and a draught of 4.67 m (15 ft 4 in). The submarine was powered by two MAN M 9 V 40/46 supercharged four-stroke, nine-cylinder diesel engines producing a total of 4,400 metric horsepower (3,240 kW; 4,340 shp) for use while surfaced, two Siemens-Schuckert 2 GU 345/34 double-acting electric motors producing a total of 1,000 shaft horsepower (1,010 PS; 750 kW) for use while submerged. She had two shafts and two 1.92 m (6 ft) propellers. The boat was capable of operating at depths of up to 230 metres (750 ft).[1]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 18.3 knots (33.9 km/h; 21.1 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 7.3 knots (13.5 km/h; 8.4 mph).[1] When submerged, the boat could operate for 63 nautical miles (117 km; 72 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 13,850 nautical miles (25,650 km; 15,940 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph). U-183 was fitted with six 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes (four fitted at the bow and two at the stern), 22 torpedoes, one 10.5 cm (4.13 in) SK C/32 naval gun, 180 rounds, and a 3.7 cm (1.5 in) as well as a 2 cm (0.79 in) anti-aircraft gun. The boat had a complement of forty-eight.[1]

Service history[edit]

After serving in the Atlantic, U-183 sailed from France in July 1943, arriving at Penang on 27 October, and operated in the zone for almost two years. She carried out six war patrols, and was sunk on 23 April 1945, days before Germany's surrender, by the American submarine Besugo (SS-321) in the Java Sea. Only one crew member survived.

In November 2013 the wreck of either this submarine or U-168 has been located.[2]

Wolfpacks[edit]

U-183 took part in three wolfpacks, namely.

  • Luchs (4–6 October 1942)
  • Panther (7–11 October 1942)
  • Hartherz (3–7 February 1943)

Summary of raiding history[edit]

Date Name Nationality Tonnage
(GRT)
Fate
3 December 1942 Empire Dabchick  United Kingdom 6,089 Sunk
11 March 1942 Olancho  Honduras 2,493 Sunk
29 February 1944 Palma  United Kingdom 5,419 Sunk
9 March 1944 British Loyalty  United Kingdom 6,993 Total loss
5 June 1944 Helen Moller  United Kingdom 6,089 Sunk

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Gröner 1991, p. 68.
  2. ^ 11/22/13 10:15am Friday 10:15am (1945-04-23). "Archaeologists Find Sunken Nazi Sub in Indonesia with 17 Skeletons". Io9.com. Retrieved 2013-11-25. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). Deutsche U-Boot-Verluste von September 1939 bis Mai 1945. Der U-Boot-Krieg (in German). IV. Hamburg, Berlin, Bonn: Mittler. ISBN 3-8132-0514-2. 
  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 4°49′59″S 112°52′01″E / 4.833°S 112.867°E / -4.833; 112.867