Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle

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Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle
Gilbert DUCLOS-LASALLE.jpg
Duclos-Lassalle at the 1993 Paris–Nice
Personal information
Full name Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle
Nickname Gibus[1]
Born (1954-08-25) August 25, 1954 (age 62)
Lembeye, France
Team information
Discipline Road
Role Rider
Professional team(s)
1977–1986 Peugeot-Esso-Michelin[2]
1987–1995 Z-Peugeot[2]
Major wins
Paris–Roubaix (1992, 1993)

Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle (born August 25, 1954 in Lembeye) is a former French professional road racing cyclist who was a specialist at one-day classic cycling races. He raced from 1977 to 1995, one of the best French riders of a generation that included Bernard Hinault and Laurent Fignon.

He was a specialist of Paris–Roubaix, but it took "Duclos", as the public called him, a long time to win. After finishing second to Francesco Moser in 1980 and Hennie Kuiper in 83, he won in 1992, finishing on Roubaix Velodrome 20 seconds ahead the German Olaf Ludwig.

Duclos-Lassalle was 37 years old. But the next year he won again, beating the Italian Franco Ballerini on the line. Ballerini, who thought he won, lifted his arms in triumph after the line but had been beaten by Duclos-Lassalle in a very close finish.[3]

Not a climber, Duclos-Lassalle was never a contender for the Tour de France but he rode well in one-week races such as Paris–Nice or the Critérium du Midi Libre.

A cobbled secteur used in Paris-Roubaix between Wallers and Hélesmes was officially named "Pont Gibus" in tribute to Duclos-Lassalle in time for the 2013 edition of the race.[1] This is the second of the race's cobbled sections to be named after him: the secteur between Cysoing and Bourghelles is known as the "Pavé Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle".[4][5]

His son Hervé Duclos-Lassalle is also a professional cyclist.

Gilbert Duclos-Lasalle has worked since retirement as a television commentator.

Major results[edit]

Organized by year[edit]

1979
46th, Overall, Tour de France
1980
1st, Overall Paris–Nice
1st, Overall Étoile des Espoirs
2nd, Paris–Roubaix
1981
1st, GP Plouay
28th, Overall, Tour de France
1982
1st, Stage 1, Critérium International
2nd, Overall Paris–Nice
60th, Overall, Tour de France
1983
1st, Bordeaux–Paris
1st, Grand Prix de Fourmies
1984
 France National Cycling Championship - Pursuit
1st, Overall Étoile des Espoirs
1985
2nd, Bordeaux–Paris
61st, Overall, Tour de France
1987
1st, GP Plouay
Jersey red.svg Intermediate sprints classification, 80th, Overall, Tour de France
1988
36th, Overall, Tour de France
1989
1st, Overall, Route du Sud
1990
65th, Tour de France
1991
1st, Stage, GP Midi Libre
60th, Tour de France
1992
1st, Paris–Roubaix
1993
1st, Paris–Roubaix
1st, Stage 2, Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré
1994
1st, Stage 3, Route du Sud
1995
1st, Stage 2, Ronde van Nederland

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Renovated "Pont Gibus" returns to Paris-Roubaix in 2013". cyclingnews.com. 3 October 2012. Retrieved 8 April 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle". Cycling Archives. Retrieved 12 July 2015. 
  3. ^ Video on YouTube
  4. ^ "Too Close Lassalle". Procyling. 3 March 2017. Retrieved 8 April 2017 – via PressReader. 
  5. ^ "A breakdown of Hell: The pavé of Paris-Roubaix". cyclingnews.com. 22 April 2009. Retrieved 8 April 2017. 

External links[edit]