Gilman School

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Gilman School
Gilman School logo.jpg
School logo
Address

,
Information
TypePrivate, All-boys, K-12 (education)
MottoIn Tuo Lumine Lumen
(Latin: "In Thy light [we see] light")
Established1897
Sister schoolBryn Mawr School
Roland Park Country School
HeadmasterHenry Smyth
Faculty146[1]
GradesK-12
GenderBoys
Number of students1,035.5[1]
CampusSuburban, 68 acres (.3 km²)
Color(s)Blue      and Gray     
Athletics conferenceMIAA
MascotGreyhound
NewspaperThe Gilman News
YearbookCynosure
AffiliationsAIMSMDDC
Website

The Gilman School /ˈɡɪlmən/ is a private preparatory school for boys located in the Roland Park neighborhood of Baltimore, Maryland. Founded in 1897 as the Country School for Boys, it was the first country day school in the US.[2] It is named for Daniel Coit Gilman, the first president of The Johns Hopkins University and an early supporter of efforts by Anne Galbraith Carey to form an all-boys day school.[3]

Gilman enrolls approximately 1,000 students, ranging from pre-kindergarten to 12th grade, under the instruction of 146 faculty members.[1] It is a member of the Association of Independent Maryland Schools[4] and the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association.[5]

Described by author C. Fraser Smith as "Baltimore's most prestigious preparatory academy,"[6] It has strong academic and athletic reputations.[7] In 2002, Worth Magazine rated Gilman among the top 30 feeder schools in the US,[8] signifying the high rate of matriculation by Gilman graduates at top colleges and universities.[9] Its graduates are known to be intensely loyal to the school. Examining the school's 2010 data, it was noted approximately 75% of the Board of Trustees were graduates of the school, one of the highest percentages of any educational institution in the US.[10] Of Gilman's 16 varsity athletic programs, 15 have won conference championships since 2000,[11] and in recent years its football, track & field, and lacrosse teams have appeared at or near the top of national rankings.[12][13]

Prominent graduates of Gilman include author Walter Lord, sportswriter Frank Deford, Arizona Governor Fife Symington, Maryland Governor Bob Ehrlich, US Senator Daniel Brewster, US Congressman John Sarbanes, and composer Christopher Rouse.

History[edit]

Gilman was founded as The Country School for Boys by Baltimore resident Anne Galbraith Carey, with assistance from Daniel Coit Gilman (1831–1908, the first president of Johns Hopkins University, 1876–1908). The school opened its doors on September 30, 1897, in the old "Homewood" Mansion (now known as the Homewood Museum, off North Charles Street, constructed 1800 in Georgian-Federal style architecture, for Charles Carroll Jr. (1775–1825), also known as Charles Carroll of Homewood, son of Charles Carroll of Carrollton (1737–1832), last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence). By 1910, J.H.U. began moving its campus north from its former downtown location along North Howard Street by Little Ross, West Centre and West Monument Streets, in the neighborhood of Mount Vernon-Belvedere to the newly named "Homewood" campus and constructing its first campus buildings of similar matching Georgian - Federal styles. In 1910, the Country School moved to its current 68-acre (275,000 m²) campus further north in the city to Roland Park, along Roland Avenue, just south of the Belvedere Avenue (and the future Northern Parkway). Here was begun one of the first planned suburban developments in America by the new Roland Park Company in 1891. At that time the institution changed its name to "The Gilman Country School for Boys", in honor of the seminal figure in its founding, Dr. Gilman. In 1951, "Country" was dropped from the name.[14]

Gilman has two sister schools: Bryn Mawr School, across Northern Parkway from Gilman to the north and Roland Park Country School, across Roland Ave to the west. All three schools coordinate some Upper School (grades 9–12) classes to the extent that some classes have students from all three schools.

Academics[edit]

An open-air classroom at Gilman, in use from 1911 to 1922[15]

The school has three divisions: Lower School (kindergarten through grade five), Middle School (grades six through eight) and Upper School (grades nine through twelve).

At the Upper School level, students are required to take courses in history, mathematics, English, science, and a foreign language each semester; an intramural or interscholastic sport each season; and a minimum of art, music, and religion instruction over four years.[16] Students must also fulfill a community service requirement[16] and may choose to participate in a range of extracurricular activities.[17] Gilman's Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) program was ranked #312 in Newsweek's 2019 nationwide survey of US high schools.[18]

A number of courses permit cross-registration by students from two neighboring girls' schools: Bryn Mawr and Roland Park Country School. In turn, Gilman students, primarily seniors, are able to enroll in equivalent courses at these sister schools.[16] Starting junior year, students are allowed to take necessary classes like English and other subjects at the sister schools. The school offers numerous courses, several through the tri-school collaboration. Cross-registration also allows for a variety of languages to be offered, which currently include French, Spanish, Latin, Ancient Greek, Chinese, Russian, Arabic, and German.

Athletics[edit]

Gilman enjoys a tradition of athletic success.[7] Since the year 2000, 12 Gilman varsity teams have won at least one conference championship.[19] Overall, the school sponsors 16 sports; most teams have varsity and junior varsity programs, while some have fresh-soph and/or middle school squads.[20]

Gilman is perhaps best known for its success in football and lacrosse. The football team has won 13 Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA) "A" Conference championships in the last 20 seasons.[19] The 2002 team finished 10–0 and was ranked 14th in the United States by USA Today's Super 25 high school football poll.[21] That team featured the Associated Press's Offensive and Defensive Player of the Year in quarterback Ambrose Wooden and lineman Victor Abiamiri. Both players went on to star at Notre Dame, and Abiamiri played five seasons for the Philadelphia Eagles. The 2005 team was ranked 12th in the nation in USA Today's Super 25 high school football poll.[22]

The lacrosse team, led by coach, upper school history teacher, and Gilman alumnus (Class of 1987) Brooks Matthews, was ranked the #1 high school team in the United States by LaxPower at the conclusion of both the 2008 and 2009 seasons.[13] The team has captured 16 MSA & MIAA "A" conference titles.[19] The lacrosse program has produced many stars in college lacrosse.

During the 2005–06 school year, six Gilman varsity squads (football, golf, ice hockey, squash, tennis & track and field) won conference titles. In 2008–09, the volleyball team won its first MIAA title, while the squash and swimming teams also won conference championships.[19]

Gilman's biggest rival is the McDonogh School,[23] located in suburban Owings Mills. A football game between the two schools has taken place every fall since 1914.[23] Gilman leads this series, 60-35-5, including a win in the 100th game in 2015.[24]

Interscholastic programs[edit]

Championship seasons[edit]

Gilman's varsity athletic teams have won over 120 championships since 1940, including 41 conference titles since the MIAA was formed in 1994.[11][19] The school currently competes in the association's highest grouping, or "A" conference, in every sport except for ice hockey.[20]

Sport MSA titles[19] MIAA conference titles[11][19][25][26]
Baseball 1976, 1990, 1993 1996, 2010
Basketball 1950, 1953, 1954, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1965, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1980 2004, 2005, 2012 (*B conference championship)
Cross country 1980 1996, 1997 (split)[27]
Football 1940, 1941, 1966, 1967, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1976 (split), 1986 (split), 1987 (split), 1990 (split), 1994 (split), 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 (split), 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006 (Split), 2009, 2011, 2012, 2014 (split), 2015
Golf 1974 (split), 1977 (split), 1979, 1987, 1990, 1991 1995, 1998, 2006, 2007, 2008
Ice Hockey 2004, 2006, 2013, 2016
Indoor Track 2011, 2012, 2015, 2018
Lacrosse 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1956, 1970 (split), 1973, 1976, 1978, 1981, 1994 1995, 1998, 2000, 2009, 2011
Soccer 1971, 1972 1995 (split), 2001, 2010
Squash 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016
Swimming B conference: 1979, 1981, 1984 B conference: 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011
Tennis 1958, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1976, 1978 (split), 1982 (split), 1983, 1986, 1991 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007,[27] 2010,[28] 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
Track and field 1978, 1985 1995, 1996, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2017, 2018, 2019
Volleyball 2008, 2013, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018
Water polo 2000, 2007, 2019
Wrestling 1953, 1955, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1984 (split), 1990

Awards[edit]

Commencement ceremonies held in front of Gilman's Alumni Auditorium

Gilman confers over 50 awards at the upper school level for achievement in academics, athletics, student leadership, and extracurricular activities.[29] Most prizes are bestowed on seniors; a smaller number are granted to underclassmen by design or as circumstances warrant. The majority are given on Awards Day, held each year in late May, while a handful of the highest honors are withheld until Founders Day, the day of Gilman's commencement ceremonies.[30]

  • The William A. Fisher Medallion is accorded to a junior or senior "who has rendered the highest service that can be rendered the School by leadership based on the influence of character."[31]
  • The William S. Thomas Scholarship Prize, consists of seven awards: six given to the top scholar of grades 8 to 12 and one for the valedictorian, as determined by academic achievement over the course of four years.[31]
  • The William Cabell Bruce Jr. Athletic Prize honors the upper school student "most conspicuous for general proficiency in athletic sports and exercises over a two-year period."[31]
  • The Daniel Baker Jr. Memorial is awarded to the senior who "through thoughtfulness and by reason of his character, has contributed to the general welfare of his fellow men."[31]
  • The Edward Fenimore Award recognizes the senior who has best exemplified the characteristics of "courage, determination, perseverance, and accomplishment."[31]
  • The Peter Parrott Blanchard Award is given to the upper school student who "by his cheerful helpfulness ... has greatly contributed to the successful and pleasant life in the School."[31]
  • The Redmond C. S. Finney Award celebrates the student who has distinguished himself "through his dedication to and practice of those human values necessary to eliminate racism, prejudice, and intolerance."[31]
  • The Daniel C. Ammidon Award recognizes students in grades 6-12 for their "outstanding citizenship and commitment to the Gilman Community."[31]

Leadership[edit]

Headmaster[3] Dates of service
Frederick Winsor 1897–1900
Roland J. Mulford 1900–1903
Samuel W. Kinney 1903–1909
Edwin B. King 1909–1912
Frank W. Pine 1912–1919
L. Wardlaw Miles 1919–1926
E. Boyd Morrow 1926–1943
Henry H. Callard 1943–1963
Ludlow H. Baldwin 1963–1968
Redmond C. S. Finney 1968–1992
Archibald R. Montgomery IV 1992–2001
Jon C. McGill 2001–2007
John E. Schmick 2007–2013
Henry Smyth 2013–present
President, Board of Trustees[3] Dates of service
William A. Fisher 1897–1900
Francis M. Jencks 1900–1907
Joseph S. Ames 1907–1912
John M. T. Finney 1912–1942
Charles S. Garland 1943–1949
Edward K. Dunn Sr. 1949–1956
Richard W. Emory 1956–1965
I. Ridgeway Trimble 1965–1969
Owen Daly II 1969–1975
William J. McCarthy 1975–1980
J. Richard Thomas 1980–1985
George E. Thomsen 1985–1990
George B. Hess 1990–1994
James S. Riepe 1994–1998
Stephen T. Scott 1998–2002
Raymond L. Bank 2002–2006
Charles C. Fenwick Jr. 2007–2010
Paul F. McBride 2010–present

Notable alumni[edit]

Living[edit]

Deceased[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ Sargent, Porter (1918). A Handbook of American private schools. Boston: Porter E. Sargent.
  3. ^ a b c Smithwick, Patrick, ed. (1997). "History". Gilman Voices. Baltimore: Gilman School: 20. ISBN 978-0-9657449-0-4.
  4. ^ "Directory of Member Schools". Association of Independent Maryland Schools. Retrieved April 10, 2009.
  5. ^ "Gilman School Sports". Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association. Archived from the original on April 10, 2009. Retrieved April 10, 2009.
  6. ^ Smith, C. Fraser (1999). William Donald Schaefer: A Political Biography. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 76. ISBN 978-0-8018-6252-6.
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External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°21′37″N 76°38′02″W / 39.3603°N 76.6340°W / 39.3603; -76.6340