Hot reading

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"Hot read" redirects here. For the American football term, see Hot read (American football).

Hot reading is a technique used when giving a psychic reading in stage magic performances, or in other contexts. In hot reading, the reader uses information about the person receiving the reading (for example, from background research or overhearing a conversation) which the receiver is not aware that the reader already knows. Hot reading is commonly used in conjunction with cold reading (where no previously gathered information is used) and can explain how a psychic reader can get a specific claimed "hit" of accurate information.[1]

This technique is used by some television psychics in conjunction with cold reading.[2] The psychics may have clients schedule their appearance ahead of time, and then collect information using collaborators who pose as religious missionaries, magazine sales people, or similar roles.[3] Such visitors can gain a wide understanding of a person from examining their home. The "psychic" may then be briefed on the information, and told where the person will sit in the audience.[4]


There are many methods that involve hot reading. In 1938, the magician John Mulholland wrote:

Where do the mediums get the information? It is very easy. Look the person up in a telephone book. Talk to the corner grocer. Go to the house and try to sell a magazine subscription. Talk to the neighbours. Talk to the servants if there are any. If it is a small city go to the cemetery and look at the tombstones. It has to be done carefully but it is very easy.[5]

Commenting on mediums from the early 20th century, historian Ruth Brandon noted:

There were a number of recognized methods in use. Some were very down-to-earth. When a medium visited a new town, he was advised to visit the local cemetery and make a note of names, dates, and any other information to be obtained from the tombstones. He might also consult the "Blue Book" for the area, a compilation circulated among mediums listing, for an increasing number of places, the names of leading spiritualists likely to attend seances, with descriptions, family histories, and details (deceased spouses, children, parents, etc.) and other information likely to be of use.[6]

Notable mediums from the past who were exposed as utilizing hot reading methods have included Rosina Thompson and George Valiantine.[7][8]

Modern examples of hot reading[edit]

Independent Investigation Group IIG director James Underdown writes that in one of the live shows of Beyond they witnessed, James Van Praagh was observed signing books and chatting with a woman he learned was from Italy. During the taping he asked that same section if there was "someone from another country". To the TV audience this would have looked impressive when she raised her hand, however he had used the hot reading technique of gaining foreknowledge.[9][10]

A 2001 Time article reported that psychic John Edward allegedly used hot reading on his television show, Crossing Over, where an audience member who received a reading was suspicious of prior behaviour from Edward's aides, who had struck up conversations with audience members and asked them to fill out cards detailing their family trees.[11] In December 2001, Edward was alleged to have used foreknowledge to hot read in an interview on the television show Dateline, where a reading for a cameraman was based on knowledge gained in conversation some hours previously, yet presented as if he were unaware of the cameraman's background.[12] In his 2001 book, John Edward denied ever using foreknowledge, cold or hot reading.[13]

See also[edit]


  1. ^ Robert Todd Carroll. "Hot Reading". The Skeptic's Dictionary. Retrieved 2006-06-14. 
  2. ^ Colin Hunter. "Cold Reading: Confessions of a 'Psychic'". Skeptic Report. Archived from the original on 2007-09-23. Retrieved 2007-10-18. 
  3. ^ Secrets of Psychics Revealed, NBC (2003)
  4. ^ Stagnaro, Angelo. Something from Nothing. Manipulix Books. 2004.
  5. ^ Mulholland, John . (1938). Beware Familiar Spirits. Charles Scribner's Sons. p. 186. ISBN 0-684-16181-8
  6. ^ Brandon, Ruth. (1983). The Spiritualists: The Passion for the Occult in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Weidenfeld and Nicolson. p. 46. ISBN 0-297-78249-5
  7. ^ McCabe, Joseph. (1920). Is Spiritualism Based On Fraud? The Evidence Given By Sir A. C. Doyle and Others Drastically Examined. London Watts & Co. p. 138. "Dr. Hodgson, that quint mixture of blunt criticism and occasional credulity, had six sittings with her, and roundly stated that she was a fraud. The correct information which she gave him was, he said, taken from letters to which she had access, or from works of references like Who's Who. In one case, which made a great impression, she gave some remarkably abstruse and correct information. It was afterwards found that the facts were stated in an old diary which had belonged to her husband."
  8. ^ Tabori, Price. (1966). Harry Price: The Biography of a Ghosthunter. Living Books. p. 120
  9. ^ Underdown, James (Sep–Oct 2003). "TV psychics John Edward and John Van Praagh". Skeptical Inquirer. Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. 27 (5): 41–45. 
  10. ^ "How come TV psychics seem so convincing?". The Straight Dope. 2003-11-18. Retrieved 2011-03-12. 
  11. ^ Leon Jaroff (2001-02-25). "Talking to the Dead". Time Magazine. Retrieved 2006-06-14. 
  12. ^ Joe Nickell. "John Edward: Hustling the Bereaved". CSICOP. Retrieved 2006-06-14. 
  13. ^ Edward, John (2001). Crossing Over. Jodere Group. ISBN 1-58872-002-0.