Ironwood

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Ironwood is a common name for a large number of woods or plants that have a reputation for hardness, or specifically a wood density that is over 1000 kg/m3 and sinks in water. Usage of the name ironwood in English may (or may not) include the tree that yields this heavy wood.

Some of the species involved with their common name[edit]

Some of the species involved with their wood weight[edit]

The equivalent German language term "Eisenholz” is given only to woods of plants with their wood weight of nearly 1000 kg/m3 or more, see German Wikipedia: Eisenholz

Plants named ironwood[edit]

or may refer to

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Acacia estrophiolata F. Muell". FAO. July 9, 2008. Archived from the original on 2008-07-09.
  2. ^ Yashe, Asavela; Hankey, Andrew (October 2014). "Androstachys johnsonii Prain". PlantzAfrica. SANBI.
  3. ^ "Giant Ironwood - profile". Threatened species. New South Wales Office of Environment & Heritage. 2014-08-05.
  4. ^ Metzger, F. T. (1990). "Carpinus caroliniana". In Burns, Russell M.; Honkala, Barbara H. Hardwoods. Silvics of North America. Washington, D.C.: United States Forest Service (USFS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). 2 – via Southern Research Station (www.srs.fs.fed.us).
  5. ^ Boland, D. J.; Brooker, M. I. H.; Chippendale, G. M.; McDonald, M. W. (2006). Forest trees of Australia (5th ed.). Collingwood, Vic.: CSIRO Publishing. p. 82. ISBN 0-643-06969-0.
  6. ^ "Cynometra alexandri". Wood Technical Fact Sheets. USDA Forest Service.
  7. ^ Boland, D.J.; Brooker, M.I.H; Chippendale, G.M.; Hall, N.; et al. (1984). Forest trees of Australia. Melbourne: CSIRO. p. 68.
  8. ^ "Holodiscus discolor (Pursh) Maxim". Plants Profile. USDA. 2008.
  9. ^ "Caesalpinia ferrea Mart. ex Tul". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).
  10. ^ "Azobe (Lophira alata)". Wildscreen Arkive.
  11. ^ Erwin, D. M. & Schorn, H. E. (2000). "Revision of Lyonothamnus A.Gray (Rosaceae) from the Neogene of Western North America". International Journal of Plant Sciences. 161 (1): 179–193. doi:10.1086/314232.
  12. ^ "Mesua ferrea L. – Clusiaceae". biotik.org.
  13. ^ "Nestegis apetala". New Zealand Plant Conservation Network.
  14. ^ "Chionanthus foveolatus". Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families.
  15. ^ "Olea capensis". Ecocrop. FAO.
  16. ^ "Olea woodiana". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).