King's Division

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The King's Division is a British Army command, training and administrative apparatus designated for infantry regiments in the North of England.

History[edit]

The King's Division was formed in 1968 with the union of the Lancastrian Brigade, Yorkshire Brigade and North Irish Brigade. The depot was established at Queen Elizabeth II Barracks in Strensall.[1]

Under the restructuring announced in 2004, the King's Division was reorganized into two large regiments:[2]

In 2017 the Mercian Regiment moved to the King's Division.[3]

The King's Division therefore now comprises the following infantry battalions:[4]

  • Army Reserve Units
    • 4th Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment (King's Lancashire and Border)
    • 4th Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot)
    • 4th Battalion, the Mercian Regiment (Cheshire, Worcesters and Foresters, and Staffords)[5]


In addition, the King's Division also maintains a single regular army band titled the Band of the King's Division. The Band was formed through the amalgamation of two former divisional bands, the Normandy Band and the Waterloo Band.[6] The Band of the Yorkshire Regiment is an army reserve band within the King's Division working from the 4th Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment. The band was formed in 2008.

Future[edit]

A written statement says that The Mercian Regiment from the Prince of Wales’s Division will join with the King’s Division.[7]

Past units[edit]

Past units include:[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Strensall Area Guide". Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  2. ^ "Future Structure of the Army". Ministry of Defence. 16 December 2004. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  3. ^ "The Mercian Regiment Newsletter August 2017" (PDF). Bowyers. Retrieved 23 February 2018. 
  4. ^ Heyman, p. 89
  5. ^ a b "Strategic Defence and Security Review - Army". Hansard. 15 December 2016. Retrieved 10 September 2017. 
  6. ^ "The Band of The King's Division". Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 5 May 2014. 
  7. ^ "Strategic Defence and Security Review - Army: Written statement - HCWS367". Hansard. Retrieved 16 December 2016. 
  8. ^ Whitaker's Almanack 1969

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]