List of surviving de Havilland Mosquitos

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The de Havilland Mosquito is a British two-engine multi-role combat aircraft used by the Royal Air Force and other Allied air forces during World War II. Of the 7,781 planes built, 30 survive today, four of which are airworthy.

Surviving aircraft[edit]

Surviving aircraft by manufacturer[edit]

Plant Number produced Number surviving
de Havilland Hatfield 3,326 13
de Havilland Leavesden 1,476 4
Standard Motor Company 1,066 3
Percival Aircraft Company 245 0
Airspeed Aircraft 122 5
de Havilland Hawarden 96 0
de Havilland Canada 1,076 2
de Havilland Australia 212 3
7,619 30

Surviving aircraft[edit]

Serial Geographic location Institutional location Status History Photo
W4050 United Kingdom London Colney, Hertfordshire de Havilland Aircraft Museum On display Built by de Havilland Hatfield as prototype. First Mosquito built and had first flight on 25 November 1940. Owned by W. J. S. Baird of Hatfield from 1946 to 1959. Acquired by de Havilland Museum in 1959. The aircraft is now on display after its £41,000 restoration.[1] De havilland Museum - Mosquito prototype 75th Anniversary event (23429399350).jpg
A52-19 New Zealand Auckland, North Island Museum of Transport and Technology On display Built by de Havilland Australia as FB40. During production renumbered A52-1053 and converted to T43. One of four Mosquitoes sold to RNZAF in April 1947; upon import renumbered NZ2305. Sent to 75 Squadron in April 1947. Sold to Robin Coleman in 1952. In 1964 purchased by MOTAT. Restoration completed in 2007.[2] Collection of planes at MOTAT.jpg
A52-20 New Zealand Drury, North Island Private (Glyn Powell) Under restoration for display Built by de Havilland Australia as FB40. During production renumbered A52-1054 and converted to T43. One of four Mosquitoes sold to RNZAF in April 1947; upon import renumbered NZ2308. Struck off in 1955 and left on a farm in Riwaka. Currently under restoration by Powell.
A52-210 Australia Canberra Australian War Memorial On display Built by de Havilland Australia as FB40. During production renumbered A52-319 and converted to PR41. Sold in 1953 to J. Woods. Changed hands several times between 1969 and 1971. In 1979 sold to Australian War Memorial. De Havilland Mosquito at the Australian War Memorial Nov 2012.jpg
DZ542 United Kingdom Yeovil, Somerset, but it's in New Zealand Ardmore, New Zealand to be restored to flight. Mosquito Pathfinder Trust, but with Avspecs to be restored. Under restoration to airworthy Built by de Havilland Hatfield as FBIV. Delivered in March 1944. Sent to 618 Squadron at RAF Skitten in April, to RAF Wick in July, and to RAF Beccles in August. Used to test Barnes Wallis's "Highball" bouncing bomb. Following the War sent to RAAF Narromine. Struck off in 1947 and left on a farm. Acquired in 1988 by Glyn Powell. Acquired by Mosquito Pathfinder Trust in 2015 and sent to Avspecs in New Zealand for restoration.[3]
HJ711 United Kingdom East Kirkby, Lincolnshire Lincolnshire Aviation Heritage Centre On display Built by de Havilland Hatfield as NFII. Sent to 169 Squadron at RAF Little Snoring. Flown in combat and credited with a Bf 110 over Berlin. In 1960s used by RAF Air Training Corps at Chingford. Acquired by Reflectaire Museum, Blackpool in 1971. Acquired by Yorkshire Air Museum in 1972. Restored using parts from PF498, VA878, NT616, and RS715. Wears 169 livery as VI-C. In 2017 moved from Yorkshire Air Museum to Lincolnshire.[4] De Havilland Mosquito at Yorkshire Air Museum (8330).jpg
HR621 Australia Harrington Park, New South Wales Camden Museum of Aviation Under restoration for display Built by Standard Motors as FBVI. Assigned to 618 Squadron. Following War sent to RAAF Narromine. Sold in 1947 to M. Powell in Tomingley. Recovered in 1968 from a farm by Camden Museum. Currently under restoration. (Museum is not open to the public.)
KA114 United States Virginia Beach, Virginia Military Aviation Museum Airworthy Built by de Havilland Canada as FB26. Brought on command 22 February 1944. Struck off 13 April 1948. Sent to RCAF Vulcan and sold to a farmer in Milo, Alberta. Acquired by Canadian Museum of Flight in Vancouver in 1979. In 2004 purchased by Jerry Yagen of the Military Aviation Museum and sent to New Zealand for restoration by Avspecs. First flight on 27 September 2012. Arrived in the United States in March 2013.[5] MosquitoKA114Taxi.jpg
KB336 Canada Ottawa, Ontario Canada Aviation and Space Museum On display Built by de Havilland Canada as BXX. Taken on strength in June 1944 and assigned to No. 7 Operational Training Unit at RCAF Debert. Placed in storage in Calgary following the War. Sent to museum in Rockliffe in 1964.[6] KB336 De Havilland DH.98 Mosquito BXX (7642227334).jpg
LR480 South Africa Johannesburg, Gauteng South African National Museum of Military History On display Built by de Havilland Hatfield as PRIX. Delivered to SAAF in 1944. Assigned to museum in 1946 where it has been since.
NS631 Australia Point Cook, Victoria RAAF Museum Under restoration for display Built by de Havilland Hatfield as PRXVI. Sent to RAAF as A52-600 in December 1944. Stationed at RAAF Ballarat from 1947 to 1954. Sold to E. Voltaire of Mildura in 1954 and stored in an orchard. Acquired by Warbirds Aviation Museum in 1966. Owned by a group of three individuals from 1983 to 1987. Acquired by RAAF Museum in 1987. Currently under restoration.
PZ474 United States San Antonio, Texas Lewis Air Legends Airworthy Built by de Havilland Hatfield as FB.VI. Delivered to RNZAF as NZ2384 in April 1947. Used privately from 1953 to 1959. Acquired by Rod Lewis circa 2017. Sent to New Zealand for restoration by Avspecs. First flight after restoration 13 January 2019 at Ardmore, New Zealand, piloted by Steve Hinton. Registered in New Zealand as ZK-BCV, the registration it wore between 1953 and 1955 after RNZAF service, then as N474PZ in the United States.
RK952 Belgium Brussels Musée Royal de l’Armée et d’Histoire Militaire On display Built by de Havilland Leavesden as NF30. Acquired by Belgian Air Force in 1953 as MB24 and used until 1957, at which time it was placed in museum. De Havilland DH.98 Mosquito NF.30 ‘MB24 - ND-N’ (34642065086).jpg
RL249 United Kingdom East Goscote, Leicestershire The People's Mosquito Under restoration to airworthy Built by de Havilland Leavesden as NF36. In February 1949 crashed at RAF Coltishall while with 23 Squadron. Wreckage recovered in 2010. Restoration underway in conjunction with Aerowood Ltd. of Auckland, New Zealand. Will be finished as an FBVI.[7]
RS700 Canada Nanton, Alberta Bomber Command Museum of Canada Under restoration for display Built by Airspeed Aircraft as B35. Stored at RAF Silloth in early 1950s. Converted to PR.35 in 1951 and operated by 58 Squadron, RAF. Used as an aerial photo mapping plane from 1954 to 1960 by Spartan Air Services of Ottawa, Ontario. Acquired in 1964 by Lynn Garrison of Calgary for the failed Air Museum of Canada. Now owned by the City of Calgary. Moved to the Bomber Command Museum of Canada in Nanton, AB and currently under restoration by the Calgary Mosquito Society to 'run and taxi' status. Will be finished in Spartan livery. Viewable to public during restoration.[8] MOSQUITO B.35 (RS700)(CF-HMS).jpg
RS709 United States Dayton, Ohio National Museum of the United States Air Force On display Built by Airspeed Aircraft as B35. Used in 633 Squadron in 1963 and Mosquito Squadron in 1968. Owned privately from 1964 to 1984. Acquired by USAF Museum in 1984 and displayed in USAAF livery as NS519.[9] De Havilland DH.98 Mk.XVI Mosquito LNose light Airpower NMUSAF 25Sep09 (14413207578).jpg
RS712 United States Oshkosh, Wisconsin EAA Aviation Museum On display Built by Airspeed Aircraft as B35. Used in 633 Squadron in 1963 and Mosquito Squadron in 1968. Owned privately from 1964 on. In 1981 acquired by Kermit Weeks. Has been on loan to EAA Museum since 1991.[10] Mosquito B.Mk.35 RS712.JPG
TA122 United Kingdom London Colney, Hertfordshire de Havilland Aircraft Museum On display Built by de Havilland Hatfield as FBVI. Stored at RAF Celle from 1950 to 1951, and at the Delft Technical University in the Netherlands from 1951 to 1964. Wings destroyed in 1958. Acquired by Royal Netherlands Air Force Museum in 1978. In 1978 acquired by de Havilland Museum. Restoration used wings from TW233. Wears livery of 4 Squadron UP-G.[11] De Havilland DH98 Mosquito FB.VI ‘TA122 - UP-G’ (16826723768).jpg
TA634 United Kingdom London Colney, Hertfordshire de Havilland Aircraft Museum On display Built by de Havilland Hatfield as B35. Owned by City of Liverpool from 1963 to 1970. Used in Mosquito Squadron in 1968. Acquired by de Havilland Museum in 1970. Restored from 1980 to 1990. Wears livery of NX992 (8K-K).[12] De Havilland DH98 Mosquito B.35 ‘TA634 - 8K-K’ (G-AWJV) (16833282818).jpg
TA639 United Kingdom Cosford, Shropshire RAF Museum Cosford On display Built by de Havilland Hatfield as B35. Used in 633 Squadron in 1963. Placed in RAF Museum storage in 1967. Put on display at Cosford in 1970. Wears livery of TA639 (AZ-E).[13] RAF Museum Mosquito.jpg
TA661 Canada Windsor, Ontario Canadian Historical Aircraft Association Under restoration for display Built by de Havilland Hatfield as B35. Stored at RAF Silloth 1953-1954. Acquired by Spartan Air Services of Ottawa, Ontario in 1954. On 10 July 1956 made an emergency landing near Pelly Lake, Northwest Territories and was destroyed by fire. Wreckage recovered by Windsor group in 1996. Under restoration as KB161 by Windsor Mosquito Bomber Group.[14]
TA719 United Kingdom Duxford, Cambridgeshire Imperial War Museum Duxford On display Built by de Havilland Hatfield as B35. Used in 633 Squadron in 1963. Belly damaged during landing in 1964. Used in ground scene in Mosquito Squadron in 1968. Rebuilt from 1968 to 1973. Place on display at Duxford in 1978.[15] De Havilland DH-98 Mosquito TT35, UK - Air Force AN0779126.jpg
TE758 New Zealand Christchurch, South Island Ferrymead Aeronautical Society Under restoration for display Built by Standard Motors as FBVI. Sent to RNZAF in April 1947 as NZ2328. Sold to private owner in 1955 and subsequently stored on a farm near Totara. Acquired in 1972 by Ferrymead Society. Under restoration using wings from HR339.[16]
TE910 New Zealand Mapua, South Island Private (John Smith) Complete sitting on undercarriage. Built by Standard Motors as FBVI. Sent to RNZAF as NZ2336 in April 1947. Sold in 1956 to John Smith. Sitting on undercarriage next to P51 Mustang, two P40 and one Hudson fuselage, under covered storage. Inaccessible to public. Aircraft are surrounded by considerable amounts of equipment and parts.
TH998 United States Silver Hill, Maryland National Air and Space Museum Dismantled and in storage Built by de Havilland Hatfield as B35. Taken on strength in August 1945 at RAF Shawbury. Converted to TT35 by Brooklands in 1952. Used as towing aircraft at RAF Exeter from 1952 to 1962. In August 1962 sent to United States for the Smithsonian. Has been in storage at Paul E. Garber Facility since then.[17]
TJ138 United Kingdom London Royal Air Force Museum London On display Built by de Havilland Hatfield as B35. Used as a travelling exhibit during the 1960s. Acquired by RAF Museum in 1967. On display at Hendon since 1992.[18] De Havilland DH98 Mosquito B.35 ‘TJ138 - VO-L’ (17060382948).jpg
TV959 United States Everett, Washington Flying Heritage and Combat Armor Museum Airworthy Built by de Havilland Leavesden as TIII. Taken on command in August 1945. Struck off in May 1963. In 1963 used in 633 Squadron. Acquired by Imperial War Museum in 1989. In 2003 FHCAM acquired the aircraft by trade and sent it to Avspecs in New Zealand for restoration. Made first flight in late 2016. Wears livery of NS838[19]

De Havilland Mosquito NS838.jpg

TW117 Norway Bodø, Nordland Norwegian Aviation Museum On display Built by de Havilland Leavesden as TIII. Stored by RAF Museum from 1963 to 1967. In 1963 used in 633 Squadron. On display at Hendon from 1972 to 1991. Acquired by Norwegian Museum in 1991. Wears 333 Squadron livery.[20]
VP189 Canada Edmonton, Alberta Alberta Aviation Museum On display Built by Airspeed Aircraft as B35. Used by Spartan Air Services of Ottawa, Ontario from 1954 to 1963. Displayed at CFB Edmonton from 1968 to 1970. Purchased by City of Edmonton in 1975. Has been on display since 2002.[21] HR147 De Havilland DH.98 Mosquito (7643717228).jpg
VR796 Canada Vancouver, British Columbia Private (Robert Jens) Airworthy Built by Airspeed Aircraft as B35. Stored until 1954. Used by Spartan Air Services of Ottawa, Ontario from 1954 to 1963. Owned by Don Campbell of Kapuskasing, Ontario from 1966 to 1986 and during that time restoration commenced. Moved to Mission, British Columbia in 1979. Owned by Ed Zalesky of Surrey, British Columbia from 1986 to 2002. Purchased by Robert Jens in 2000 and restoration completed in Victoria by Victoria Air Maintenance Ltd. First flight on 16 June 2014 by Steve Hinton. Wears livery of LR503 "F for Freddie," which crashed in Calgary during a celebration on VE Day (9 May 1945).[22]

Wrecks[edit]

Serial Geographic location Institutional location History
RF597 New Zealand Christchurch, South Island Air Force Museum of New Zealand Built by Standard Motors as FBVI. Sent to RNZAF as NZ2383. Owned privately from 1952 to 1957, at which time it was broken up. Acquired by RNZAF Museum in 1995. Sitting as a derelict hulk.
TE863 New Zealand Christchurch, South Island Air Force Museum of New Zealand Built by Standard Motors as FBVI. Sent to RNZAF as NZ2355 in July 1947. Disposed of at RNZAF Woodbourne in 1955. Owned privately after 1955. Acquired in 1988 by RNZAF Museum. Sitting as a derelict hulk.
TJ118 United Kingdom London Colney, Hertfordshire de Havilland Aircraft Museum Built by de Havilland Hatfield as B35. Placed immediately in storage with No 27 Maintenance Unit at RAF Shawbury. Converted to TT35 in 1953 by Brooklands Aviation. The nose was removed in 1963 and used for interior scenes in 633 Squadron. Later purchased by de Havilland Museum.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "de Havilland DH98 Mosquito Prototype – de Havilland Aircraft Museum". www.dehavillandmuseum.co.uk. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  2. ^ Digital, Born. "MOTAT: Collections - AIRCRAFT [DE HAVILLAND DH98 MOSQUITO T MK 43]". Motat. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  3. ^ "de Havilland Mosquito will fly again". de Havilland Mosquito will fly again. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  4. ^ "Mosquito Arrives!! - Lincolnshire Aviation Heritage Centre". www.lincsaviation.co.uk. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  5. ^ "de Havilland DH-98 Mosquito". www.militaryaviationmuseum.org. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  6. ^ "De Havilland D.H.98 Mosquito B XX - Canada Aviation and Space Museum". ingeniumcanada.org. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  7. ^ "The People's Mosquito - To Fly ~ To Educate ~ To Remember". The People's Mosquito. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  8. ^ McTavish, Trevor. "The Calgary Mosquito Society". www.calgarymosquitosociety.com. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  9. ^ "De Havilland DH 98 Mosquito". National Museum of the US Air Force™. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  10. ^ "1946 de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito B.35 - N35MK". www.eaa.org. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  11. ^ "de Havilland DH98 Mosquito FB Mk.VI – de Havilland Aircraft Museum". www.dehavillandmuseum.co.uk. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  12. ^ "de Havilland DH98 Mosquito B.Mk.35 – de Havilland Aircraft Museum". www.dehavillandmuseum.co.uk. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  13. ^ "Detail page | Research | Collections | RAF Museum". www.rafmuseum.org.uk. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  14. ^ "Canadian Historical Aircraft Association, CH2A, Lancaster FM212". Canadian Historical Aircraft Association, CH2A, Lancaster FM212. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  15. ^ "De Havilland Mosquito TT.35 | Imperial War Museums". www.iwm.org.uk. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  16. ^ "de Havilland Mosquito FB VI - Ferrymead Aeronautical Society Inc". www.ferrymeadaero.org.nz. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  17. ^ "De Havilland DH-98 B/TT Mk. 35 Mosquito". National Air and Space Museum. 20 March 2016. Retrieved 3 February 2018.
  18. ^ "Detail page | Research | Collections | RAF Museum". www.rafmuseum.org.uk. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  19. ^ "de Havilland D.H.98 Mosquito T.Mk.III".
  20. ^ "De Havilland DH 98 T. Mk. III Mosquito - Norsk Luftfartsmuseum". Norsk Luftfartsmuseum. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  21. ^ "Alberta Aviation Museum". www.albertaaviationmuseum.com. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  22. ^ "deHavilland Mosquito Restoration Project". Victoria Air Maintenance Ltd. Retrieved 1 February 2018.