Morane (French Polynesia)

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Morane
MoraneISS005-15060.PNG
NASA picture of Morane Atoll.
Morane (French Polynesia) is located in French Polynesia
Morane (French Polynesia)
Geography
Location Pacific Ocean
Coordinates 23°10′S 137°08′W / 23.167°S 137.133°W / -23.167; -137.133Coordinates: 23°10′S 137°08′W / 23.167°S 137.133°W / -23.167; -137.133
Archipelago Tuamotus
Area 11 km2 (4.2 sq mi)  (lagoon)
2 km2 (above water)
Length 5.8 km (3.6 mi)
Width 3.5 km (2.17 mi)
Country
France
Overseas collectivity French Polynesia
Administrative subdivision Tuamotus
Commune Gambier Islands
Demographics
Population Uninhabited[1] (as of 2012)

Morane[2] is an uninhabited small isolated atoll of the Tuamotu Archipelago in French Polynesia. It is located 153 km southwest of Maria Est, its closest neighbour. Morane Atoll is the southernmost atoll of the Tuamotus proper. It measures 5.8 km in length, 3.5 km in width and has a land area of 2 km2. The lagoon has an area of 11 km2 and has no passes. The islands on its reef are covered with screw pine (Pandanus) and coconut trees.

History[edit]

The first recorded westerner to sight Morane Atoll was US whaler Nathaniel Cary in 1832.[3] He named it "Barstow's Island" after his ship Gideon Barstow.[4] In some maps it appears as "Cadmus".

Administration[edit]

Administratively Morane Atoll belongs to the commune of the Gambier Islands.

Ecology[edit]

By 2003, Morane Atoll holds one of the largest extant populations (approx. 50 individuals) of the critically endangered Polynesian ground-dove.[5] It also has one of the highest concentrations of the Tuamotu sandpiper (Prosobonia cancellata), with approximately 150 to 200 individuals of the species.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Population". Institut de la statistique de la Polynésie française. Retrieved 9 October 2014. 
  2. ^ Young, J.L. (1899). "Names of the Paumotu Islands, with the old names so far as they are known.". Journal of the Polynesian Society 8 (4): 264–268. Retrieved 7 January 2015. 
  3. ^ [1][dead link]
  4. ^ "Place Names". Sailingnavies.com. Retrieved 2015-06-26. 
  5. ^ "Polynesian Ground-dove (Alopecoenas erythropterus) - BirdLife species factsheet". Birdlife.org. 1999-04-30. Retrieved 2015-06-26. 
  6. ^ Blanvillain, Caroline; Florent, Chevallier; Thenot, Vincent (February 2002). "Land birds of Tuamotu Archipelago, Polynesia: relative abundance and changes during the 20th century with particular reference to the critically endangered Polynesian ground-dove (Gallicolumba erythroptera)". Biological Conservation 103 (2): 139–149. doi:10.1016/S0006-3207(01)00112-4. 

External links[edit]