President's Council on Sports, Fitness, and Nutrition

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The President's Council on Sports, Fitness and Nutrition (PCSFN) is an American government organization that aims to "promote, encourage and motivate Americans of all ages to become physically active and participate in sports".[citation needed] It is part of the Office of Public Health and Science, an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Prior to June 2010, it was called the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.[1]

The Council's work is informed by a Science Board, composed primarily of academic researchers and scholars.[2] The first Science Board was appointed during the George W. Bush administration in 2003 with Charles B. "Chuck" Corbin, Ph.D., Arizona State University, serving as its inaugural Chair.[3] In 2016, Dr. Corbin received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the PCSFN.[4]

The Science Board was active for several years, but eventually went dormant. It was reinstated on June 21, 2019,[5] with strong urging from organizations such as the National Academy of Kinesiology.[6][7]

A newly formed Science Board was announced on January 22, 2020, with Bradley J. Cardinal, Ph.D., Oregon State University, appointed as Chair.[8] During their 2 year term, the Science Board established the scientific basis of the National Youth Sports Strategy, including a wide variety of evidence-based documents and reports.[9][10][11][12][13][14]

History[edit]

During the 1940s, the American Medical Association and the National Committee on Physical Fitness had a joint committee encouraging physical fitness.[15]

The President's Council on Youth Fitness was founded on July 16, 1956, to encourage American children.[16]

In 1963, President Kennedy changed the council's name to President's Council on Physical Fitness to reflect its role to serve all Americans.[16]

In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson created the Presidential Physical Fitness Award, the name of which was later changed to President's Challenge Youth Physical Fitness Awards Program. In 1968, the council's name was changed to President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports to emphasize the importance of sports in life.[17]

In 1972, the Presidential Sports Award Program was created.[18]

In 1983, the United States Congress declared May as National Physical Fitness and Sports Month.

In 1996, the Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health was released. In 1997, the Council released its report on Physical Activity and Sport in the Lives of Boys.[citation needed]

In June 2010, President Barack Obama renamed the agency the President's Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition, with a new emphasis on nutrition as an element of fitness.[19] First Lady Michelle Obama announced the new commission's goal "to end the epidemic of childhood obesity in a generation" and also announced that the president had named, as the new co-chairs of the council, New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees and former Olympic gymnast Dominique Dawes.[20][21]

On January 11, 2012, operators of the website for participants of the Challenge and Active Lifestyle programs learned that the site had been hacked, resulting in the release of personal information of the participants.[22] The President's Challenge site displayed a notice that it was down for "Site Maintenance – We're taking a little breather."[23] On January 20, 2012, the site was modified to explain the hacking.[24] On January 27, 2012, The President's Challenge sent out emails to its participants saying that the website was functional as of January 24, 2012, and asked participants to reset their user passwords.[25][26]

Past chairpersons[edit]

George Allen served as (chairman) from 1981 to 1988.

Awards[edit]

The Council publishes guidelines for awards that are given out. They are the Presidential Physical Fitness Award, the National Physical Fitness Award, and the Participant Physical Fitness Award. However, it has been announced that the Physical Fitness Test on which these awards are based will no longer be available after the 2012–2013 school year.[31] Additionally, there is the Active Lifestyle Award for staying active[32] and the Presidential Champions Award for raising one's amount of activity.[33] The Champions awards ended on 30 June 2018.[34] There is also a Community Leadership Award that is given out annually to 50 people or organizations for encouraging physical activity, fitness, and nutrition.[35]

Standardized tests[edit]

The award was given to students who achieved the top fifteenth percentile cumulative scores across these events and were based on age/gender and were taken by all participants. Pull ups/flexed-arm hang was based on gender and was the only event where one was done by boys and the other by girls:[36]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Plowman, Sharon A.; Sterling, Charles L.; Corbin, Charles B.; Meredith, Marilu D.; Welk, Gregory J.; Morrow, James R. (2006). "The History of FITNESSGRAM®". Journal of Physical Activity and Health. 3 (Suppl. 2): S5–S20. doi:10.1123/jpah.3.s2.s5.
  2. ^ History of the Council https://health.gov/our-work/nutrition-physical-activity/presidents-council/history-council. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ "A History of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports Research Digest" (PDF). President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports Research Digest. 8 (1). 2007.
  4. ^ "PCSFN Lifetime Achievement Award".
  5. ^ https://health.gov/our-work/nutrition-physical-activity/presidents-council/history-council. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ Cardinal, Bradley J. (2018). "Update on Science Board for The President's Council on Sports, Fitness & Nutrition" (PDF). National Academy of Kinesiology Newsletter. 40 (1): 25.
  7. ^ "Weiss Represents NAK in DC Meeting to Develop a National Youth Sports Strategy" (PDF).
  8. ^ "Meet the President's Council on Sports, Fitness & Nutrition Science Board".
  9. ^ "President's Council on Sports, Fitness & Nutrition Science Board" (PDF). PCSFN Science Board Report on Youth Sports.
  10. ^ "President's Council on Sports, Fitness & Nutrition Science Board" (PDF). Benefits of youth sports.
  11. ^ "PCSFN 2020 Annual Council Meeting Agenda".
  12. ^ Whitley, Meredith A.; Smith, Alan L.; Dorsch, Travis E.; Bowers, Matthew T.; Centeio, Erin E. (2021). "Reenvisioning postpandemic youth sport to meet young people's mental, emotional, and social needs". Translational Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine. 6 (4): 1–7. doi:10.1249/TJX.0000000000000177. S2CID 244310505.
  13. ^ Whitley, Meredith A.; Smith, Alan L.; Dorsch, Travis E.; Bowers, Matthew T.; Centeio, Erin E. (2021). "Reimagining the youth sport system across the United States: A commentary from the 2020–2021 President's Council on Sports, Fitness & Nutrition Science Board". Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance. 92 (8): 6–14. doi:10.1080/07303084.2021.1963181. S2CID 239769859.
  14. ^ Cardinal, Brad. "Reflections on the 2020–2021 PCSFN Science Board. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services".
  15. ^ Journal of Health and Physical Education. 1944 p. 500, Archived at Google Books.
  16. ^ a b "The Federal Government Takes on Physical Fitness". JFK Presidential Library and Museum. JFK library.org. August 2018.
  17. ^ Maldonado, Jim (June 2, 1968). "Recreation Centers Needed in Cities". The Santa Fe New Mexican. p. B2. Retrieved 28 November 2020.
  18. ^ "Illinois Parks & Recreation, Volume 26, 3". May–June 1995.
  19. ^ Executive Order – President's Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition Archived 2017-02-08 at the Wayback Machine, White House press release, June 23, 2010.
  20. ^ "Michelle Obama jumps rope, emphasizes nutrition", USA Today, June 24, 2010.
  21. ^ "First Lady Launches President’s Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition" Archived 2017-02-16 at the Wayback Machine, White House press release, June 23, 2010.
  22. ^ Tau, Bryon (January 19, 2012). "Let's Move-affiliated website hacked". Politico. Politico.com. Retrieved January 19, 2012.
  23. ^ "Site Maintenance". The President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition. Archived from the original on January 13, 2012. Retrieved January 19, 2012.
  24. ^ "We apologize for the site maintenance. We will be back up soon". The President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition. Archived from the original on January 13, 2012. Retrieved January 20, 2012.
  25. ^ Important Security Information[dead link]
  26. ^ "Archived copy". Facebook. Archived from the original on 2012-05-13. Retrieved 2012-05-13.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  27. ^ a b c d e f President’s Council on Sports, Fitness & Nutrition (20 July 2012). "Our History". HHS.gov.
  28. ^ Oldenburg, Ann (June 24, 2010). "Michelle Obama jumps rope, emphasizes nutrition". USATODAY.COM. Retrieved February 20, 2019.
  29. ^ "First Lady Launches President's Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition" Archived February 16, 2017, at the Wayback Machine, White House press release, June 23, 2010.
  30. ^ "Meet the Council". HHS. HHS.gov. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  31. ^ "Physical Fitness Awards". Archived from the original on 2013-04-23. Retrieved 2013-03-05.
  32. ^ Active Lifestyle Award Archived 2013-04-23 at the Wayback Machine
  33. ^ Presidential Champions Aware Archived 2013-04-23 at the Wayback Machine
  34. ^ "SuperTracker Discontinued June 30, 2018". Choose MyPlate. 3 April 2015.
  35. ^ "PCSFN Community Leadership Award | health.gov". health.gov. Retrieved 2022-01-05.
  36. ^ "50 year anniversary booklet" (PDF). www.hhs.gov. Retrieved 2019-06-10.

External links[edit]