Prince Hubertus of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1909–1943)

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Prince Hubertus of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
Prince Hubertus with his sister Sibylla in 1917
Hubertus with his sister Sibylla in 1917
Born(1909-08-24)24 August 1909
Reinhardsbrunn Castle, Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Germany
Died26 November 1943(1943-11-26) (aged 34)
Velyki Mosty, General Government (present day Ukraine)
Full name
Dietmar Hubertus Friedrich Wilhelm Philipp[1]
HouseSaxe-Coburg and Gotha
FatherCharles Edward, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
MotherPrincess Victoria Adelaide of Schleswig-Holstein
British Royalty
House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
Coat of arms of the United Kingdom (1837-1952).svg
Victoria and Albert
Great-grandchildren
Prince Alastair of Connaught
Johann Leopold, Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
Princess Sibylla, Duchess of Västerbotten
Prince Hubertus of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
Princess Caroline Mathilde, Countess of Castell-Rüdenhausen
Prince Friedrich Josias of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Prince Hubertus of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (24 August 1909 – 26 November 1943) was a member of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, the second eldest son of Charles Edward, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and his wife, Princess Victoria Adelaide of Schleswig-Holstein.

Life[edit]

Prince Hubertus was born at Reinhardsbrunn Castle, Germany. His father, Charles Edward, was the reigning Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, the only son of Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany, and a grandson of Queen Victoria. Edward was declared a "traitor peer" after fighting for Germany in WW I and stripped of his peerage.[2][3][4]

Hubertus joined the German Army, and saw action in the Eastern Front during World War II. He was killed in action on 26 November 1943, aged 34, in Mosty, Ukraine.

Legacy[edit]

His sister, Princess Sibylla of Sweden, gave her son, the future King Carl XVI Gustaf, the name Hubertus in memory of her brother. Later, his son Prince Carl Philip of Sweden gave his son Prince Alexander the name Hubertus.

Ancestry[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Person Page". www.thepeerage.com.
  2. ^ Titchmarsh, Alan (9 October 2014). "The Queen's Houses". Random House – via Google Books.
  3. ^ "No. 31255". The London Gazette. 28 March 1919. p. 4000.
  4. ^ Callan, Paul (24 November 2007). "Hitler's puppet prince".