Red Bull Racing RB15

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Red Bull RB15
FIA F1 Austria 2019 Nr. 33 Verstappen 1.jpg
Max Verstappen driving the RB15 during the 2019 Austrian Grand Prix
CategoryFormula One
ConstructorRed Bull Racing
Designer(s)Adrian Newey (Chief Technical Officer)
Pierre Waché (Technical Director)
Rob Marshall (Chief Engineering Officer)
Dan Fallows (Head of Aerodynamics)
PredecessorRed Bull RB14
SuccessorRed Bull RB16
Technical specifications[1]
ChassisCarbon-epoxy composite structure designed by regulation and built in-house
Suspension (front)Aluminium alloy uprights, carbon fibre composite double wishbones with pushrods, springs, anti-roll bar and dampers
Suspension (rear)Aluminium alloy uprights, carbon fibre composite double wishbones with pullrods, springs, anti-roll bar and dampers
Length5,400 mm (213 in)
Width2,000 mm (79 in)
Height950 mm (37 in) (excluding roll-hoop onboard T-camera)
EngineHonda RA619H, 1.6 L (98 cu in) direct injection V6 turbocharged engine limited to 15,000 rpm in a mid-mounted, rear-wheel drive layout
Electric motorKinetic and thermal energy recovery systems
TransmissionRed Bull Technology 8-speed + 1 reverse sequential semi-automatic paddle shift with limited-slip differential
BatteryHonda lithium-ion batteries
PowerOver 950 hp (708 kW)
Weight743 kg (1,638 lb) including driver and fuel
FuelEsso/Mobil Synergy
LubricantsMobil 1
BrakesBrembo carbon discs, Brembo 6-piston calipers and pads
TyresPirelli P Zero (dry)
Pirelli Cinturato (wet)
Competition history
Notable entrantsAston Martin Red Bull Racing
Notable drivers
Debut2019 Australian Grand Prix
First win2019 Austrian Grand Prix
Last win2019 Brazilian Grand Prix
Last event2019 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix
RacesWinsPodiumsPolesF.Laps
213925

The Red Bull RB15 is a Formula One racing car designed and constructed by Red Bull Racing to compete during the 2019 FIA Formula One World Championship.[2] The car was driven by Max Verstappen, Pierre Gasly and Alexander Albon. Pierre Gasly was originally meant to be driving the car for the entire season after moving from Toro Rosso to replace Daniel Ricciardo.[3] However after the 2019 Hungarian Grand Prix it was announced that Alexander Albon would be replacing Gasly for the remainder of the season.[4] The RB15 is the first car built by Red Bull Racing with a Honda engine,[5] and made its competitive début at the 2019 Australian Grand Prix. Max Verstappen's win at the 2019 Austrian Grand Prix made the RB15 the first Honda-powered car to achieve victory since Jenson Button won for Honda at the 2006 Hungarian Grand Prix in the Honda RA106.

Lap records[edit]

The car holds the following official and outright lap records as of the 2019 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix:

Event Circuit Circuit Length Driver Time Source
2019 Hungarian Grand Prix Hungaroring 4.381 km (2.722 mi) Max Verstappen 1:17.103 [6]

Complete Formula One results[edit]

(key)

Year Entrant Engine Tyres Drivers Grands Prix Points WCC
AUS BHR CHN AZE ESP MON CAN FRA AUT GBR GER HUN BEL ITA SIN RUS JPN MEX USA BRA ABU
2019 Aston Martin Red Bull Racing Honda P Pierre Gasly 11 8 6F Ret 6 5F 8 10 7 4 14† 6 417 3rd
Alexander Albon 5 6 6 5 4 5 5 14 6
Max Verstappen 3 4 4 4 3 4 5 4 1F 5 1F 2PF Ret 8 3 4 Ret 6 3 1P 2

Driver failed to finish the race, but was classified as they had completed over 90% of the winner's race distance.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mitchell, Scott (12 November 2017). "Pirelli to introduce new softest-compound pink-walled F1 tyre in '18". Autosport. Motorsport Network. Archived from the original on 13 November 2017.
  2. ^ "Red Bull unveil first Honda-powered car in one-off livery". www.formula1.com. Retrieved 13 February 2019.
  3. ^ "Gasly to partner Verstappen at Red Bull in 2019". www.formula1.com. 20 August 2018. Retrieved 20 August 2018.
  4. ^ "Albon to replace Gasly at Red Bull from Belgium". formula1. 12 August 2019. Retrieved 2019-08-15.
  5. ^ van Leeuwen, Andrew (19 June 2018). "Red Bull drops Renault for 2019 Honda Formula 1 engine deal". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 19 June 2018.
  6. ^ "Hungaroring". www.formula1.com. Retrieved 2 December 2019.

External links[edit]