Talk:Bisque (food)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Food and drink (Rated Stub-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Food and drink, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of food and drink related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
 
WikiProject France (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject France, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of France on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Is this really necessary? "It is a dish designed for the pretentious and snobby set, who would know what good food really is." 68.91.163.8 22:05, 10 October 2006 (UTC)

There's some broader definition of 'bisque' too, as google search for mushroom bisque gives quite a few soups that don't have any seafood in them. Mairi 03:30, 12 February 2006 (UTC)

Non-shellfish bisque[edit]

Google and Food Network both provide recipes for many soups that are called bisques that do not include shellfish ingredients. Even if not classically considered a bisque, and rather more like a vischyssoise, this rather common usage in the current culinary landscape shows that these new types of soups have joined the shellfish varieties in our lexicon. I changed the wording of the article to clarify that classical bisque is a pureed shellfish soup, but have also included the more recent additions to the soup variety.

Strained rather than puréed[edit]

What really characterises the preparation of a (seafood) bisque is the use of the shell(s) of the crustacean/shrimp etc. to add flavour to the soup. The cooked mixture is then *strained* to remove the shell pieces, which can't be puréed, and a straining is what characterises a *coulis* - the word used in the definition given as a ref - as opposed to a *purée*. I am going to amend wording to reflect this distinction. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Faff296 (talkcontribs) 04:53, 8 March 2010 (UTC)

Pronunciation[edit]

Is there an expert in such matters that could add an appropriate pronunciation guide for the word "bisque"? This word is used internationally, but I am not sure of the French pronunciation, nor whether that pronunciation is commonly used everywhere. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 173.172.122.192 (talk) 00:33, 17 December 2012 (UTC)