Talk:Brix

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Merge Öchsle scale and Baumé scale into Brix[edit]

The following discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section.
--Jeremy (blah blahI did it!) 17:10, 10 December 2011 (UTC)
The above discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section.

Brix: Antoine or Adolph?[edit]

A quick google around seems to indicate that "Antoine Brix" actually was Adolph Brix; Antoine Baumé was the developer of the Baumé scale. However, there is now a growing perception that Brix was called Antoine (partially due to this page perpetuating this version of events). Could someone establish the correct version? --Ott2 14:55, 11 August 2007 (UTC)

Hi Ott, I went through the revision history and it appears you accidentally included it in your second edit, I'm going to change it to Adolf. Jonathan888 (talk) 20:26, 10 September 2007 (UTC)
Ouch. Thanks for fixing. -- you are welcome .Ott2 07:21, 17 September 2007 (UTC)

but brix in food is usually the pulp in the can and the number would man concentration.

Scientific usage section[edit]

The scientific usage section is very poor and just wrong. °Brix, measured by refractometer or by specific gravity (density) only ever gives the correct percentage by weight of sucrose for aqueous solutions of sucrose. For any other solution, the value may or may not bear a relation to sucrose content, depending obviously on whether the solution contains any sucrose and if so how much in relation to other soluble components. In addition, the refractive indices of the other components will also be important (if measuring with a refractometer). Measurements by refractive index and by specific gravity will only ever coincide (other than by luck) for pure sucrose solutions. It is not correct to say therefore that a solution (of any kind, e.g. fruit juice) of 20 °Brix contains 20% by weight of soluble solids. This is such a basic mistake and one that is made over and over (even by researchers who should know better) and thus perpetuated. I would therefore ask the author(s) to revise this section. In addition what is meant by an infrared brix meter is unclear. Are you talking about a digital refractometer?

Guy Self (talk) 14:14, 17 February 2009 (UTC)Guy Self

Rename?[edit]

The following discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section.
--Jeremy (blah blahI did it!) 17:10, 10 December 2011 (UTC)
The above discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section.

Specific gravity to Brix[edit]

This formula appears to have a mistake, as it doesn't generate the correct answer

°Bx = (((182.4601*S -775.6821)*S +-775.6821)*S -669.5622)

Adding a table with "typical" brix values?[edit]

I would have thought a lot of people would come here trying to figure out what the brix value on a bottle of wine meant. It strikes me that it might be useful to report a table showing typical brix, both at harvest and in the bottle, for classical styles of wines. Anyone think this is a good or bad idea (or do you think it is more common to report residual sugar when it comes to the wine in the glass?) Bilz0r (talk) 00:43, 5 September 2010 (UTC)

Text refers to a photograph[edit]

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brix#Brix_and_Actual_Dissolved_Solids_Content "...using a hand held instrument similar to the one in the photograph" - There's no photograph anywhere in this article. Was there one and it was removed? Was one intended to be added later? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 79.183.189.148 (talk) 06:16, 1 April 2013 (UTC)

Assessment comment[edit]

The comment(s) below were originally left at Talk:Brix/Comments, and are posted here for posterity. Following several discussions in past years, these subpages are now deprecated. The comments may be irrelevant or outdated; if so, please feel free to remove this section.

The scientific usage section is very poor and erroneous. °Brix, measured by refractometer or by specific gravity (density) only ever gives the correct percentage by weight of sucrose for aqueous solutions of sucrose. For any other solution, the value may or may not bear a relation to sucrose content, depending obviously on whether the solution contains any sucrose and if so how much in relation to other soluble components. In addition, the refractive indices of the other components will also be important (if measuring with a refractometer). Measurements by refractive index and by specific gravity will only ever coincide (other than by luck) for pure sucrose solutions. It is not correct to say therefore that a solution (of any kind, e.g. fruit juice) of 20 °Brix contains 20% by weight of soluble solids. This is such a basic mistake and one that is made over and over (even by researchers who should know better) and thus perpetuated.

Last edited at 13:57, 17 February 2009 (UTC). Substituted at 10:21, 29 April 2016 (UTC)

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BRIX - measure of sucrose only?, or all minerals, vitamins, and other?[edit]

Wiki states that BRIX is a measure of the sucrose density of produce and beverages (an old paradigm). There are 2 counterarguments to this: 1. Modern science indicates that BRIX is measure of the density of all nutrients in F&B, not just sucrose - see [1]. I am sire there are a number of other scientific bodies who can confirm this, but I have not searched further as this has always been my understanding of BRIX until people started saying BRIX was a measure of sugar content only. And when I tried to find out why they were saying that, and found the answer in Wiki. 2. If BIIX was a measure of sugar content only, then that implies that the produce or beverage consists only of sucrose, does it not? Yet, we know they consist of up to 50 nutrients, vitamins and minerals, according to Dr Patrick Holford in "The Optimum Nutrition Bible", and 37 according to ANZ Foods Standards and other Government Health Organizations around the world .

Any comments?

Cmacquet (talk) 18:48, 30 September 2017 (UTC) Chris Macquet

MyHealthOptimizer