Talk:HTTP cookie

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Former featured articleHTTP cookie is a former featured article. Please see the links under Article milestones below for its original nomination page (for older articles, check the nomination archive) and why it was removed.
Main Page trophyThis article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on May 8, 2006.
Article milestones
DateProcessResult
January 16, 2006Peer reviewReviewed
January 28, 2006Featured article candidatePromoted
April 7, 2009Featured article reviewDemoted
June 6, 2011Good article nomineeNot listed
Current status: Former featured article

File extension of cookies[edit]

What file extension do cookies normally have? 87.112.48.16 (talk) 11:40, 16 January 2014 (UTC)

They don't have a standard file extension as they are not typically stored individually as files on disk. Rather, each browser has its own proprietary store format for cookies. Alistair1978 (talk) 14:23, 16 January 2014 (UTC)

Default value for path?[edit]

The article says: " If not specified, they default to the domain and path of the object that was requested." Other sources say the default value for the path is "/". The sentence is also inconsistent with the example in the paragraph above. Can someone confirm or disconfirm? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Weinzierl (talkcontribs) 02:01, 25 January 2009 (UTC)

I've clarified this with a source: the RFC is very explicit on this, and the current text was correct. However, this is the default when not sending a path attribute at all - which I have never seen in a cookie in the real world. — ErikRomijn (talk) 10:12, 4 March 2014 (UTC)

Session cookies surviving reboot[edit]

The statement "Web browsers normally delete session cookies when the user closes the browser" -Which is echoed across numerous software manual pages- may no longer be accurate.

Since 2006, some browsers have acquired a mode in which any pages open at browser shutdown are automatically reopenend at the next launch of the browser. In some implementations the session cookie from the previous instance of the page may also be cached and restored. This appears to happen even if a no-cache HTTP header has been sent. With some recent browser versions adopting this automatic page-restore mode as the default, the webmaster can no longer make any assumptions about the lifetime of session cookies.

References: 1 2 3 4

The security implications are quite far-reaching, since any oversight by the user in logging off from a website -or any systems failure which prevents manual logoff- can leave the session open to misuse by an interloper after browser shutdown, or even after a computer reboot. The user does not have to OK the saving of any password for this situation to arise. --Anteaus (talk) 21:51, 3 August 2014 (UTC)

Software for Managing Cookies[edit]

If there are programs for managing cookies, a section discussing them would be a valuable addition to this article. For example, has anyone created a program which would divide a browser's cookie list into 2 parts: 1) Protected Cookies & 2) Unprotected Cookies? Protected cookies would be cookies that the user designates to be protected, like a short list of sites for which the user wants the cookies to remain. Then the rest could be set to delete every time the browser is closed or by clicking on a menu item in the main browser menu, like "DELETE ALL UNPROTECTED COOKIES." I find it a great waste of time to have to sort through a ton of cookies & delete the undesired cookies, while keeping the few I want. Moreover, in Safari (for example) one gets a menu window with only about 6 cookies showing at a time & the confounded window spontaneously jumps around, so while you are highlighting cookies to delete, suddenly it jumps away from where you were in the list. If anyone has made a program to control such annoyances, the program should be added to this article. (EnochBethany (talk) 15:20, 24 March 2015 (UTC)) It will be work — Preceding unsigned comment added by 203.17.65.32 (talk) 09:14, 17 June 2018 (UTC)

First cookie implementation[edit]

The first implementation of HTTP cookies in a browser is attributed to 0.9beta of Mosaic Netscape. Yet none of the provides sources confirm that. An internet search also yields no actual reliable sources. Mostly it's probably reciting of this Wikipedia Article. Can anyone confirm or find a source where it's stated that that specific version had the first HTTP cookie implementation? 81.11.200.192 (talk) 11:24, 21 May 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 28 July 2016[edit]

Under the section: SameSite cookie

Change this sentence: A cookie is given this characteristic by adding the SameSite flag to the cookie.

To: A cookie is given this characteristic by adding the SameSite=Lax or SameSite=Strict flag to the cookie.

See: https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-httpbis-cookie-same-site-00

SameSite needs a value of "None", "Strict", or "Lax".


2604:6000:1011:C00A:B8AA:1DF4:4835:E151 (talk) 02:22, 28 July 2016 (UTC)

Done — Andy W. (talk ·ctb) 22:23, 28 July 2016 (UTC)

Merging with Secure cookies[edit]

Please add {{Merge from|Secure cookies}} to hatnotes of the article. 80.221.159.67 (talk) 21:11, 22 October 2016 (UTC)

As for reasons for merging the article itself, there is overlapping areas of information in the articles. Secure cookie page already redirects to a section of this article (HTTP cookie#Secure cookie). I don't see much of things new value to warrant a new article for secure cookies. 80.221.159.67 (talk) 21:13, 22 October 2016 (UTC)

Done — JJMC89(T·C) 04:52, 2 November 2016 (UTC)
The Secure cookies article is an awful mix of misinformation and hearsay. Even the title would want to be changed to the singular. If there hadn't been a merge tag already, I'd have just redirected it here. There is very little worth saving that isn't already in this article. Lithopsian (talk) 16:48, 1 December 2016 (UTC)

Other kinds of cookies?[edit]

Please, fix this sentence:

> Other kinds of cookies perform essential functions in the modern web.

to:

> There are various applications for HTTP-Cookies.

The term "other kinds" is confusing, because the kind of the cookies we are talking about is the HTTP-Cookie. Wenn you talk about third-party-cookies of tracking-cookie this are different use cases of the same kind of cookie, still HTTP-Cookie. If you are talking of different kinds of cookies you mean probably: HTTP-cookies vs Flash-cookies.

External links modified[edit]

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Semi-protected edit request on 8 September 2017[edit]

in the section concerning the origin of the word, "cookie" is declared to derive from the term "magic cookie", which itself is supposed to derive from Chinese fortune cookies. However, the article referenced in the footnote to substantiate this states exactly the oppisite—that in fact there was no allusion whatsoever to Chinese fortune cookies. So please someone erase the last clause of the sentence thank you. 139.18.242.206 (talk) 11:35, 8 September 2017 (UTC)

Done Eggishorn (talk) (contrib) 16:44, 8 September 2017 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified one external link on HTTP cookie. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

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HTTP/1.1 vs HTTP/1.0[edit]

Can HTTP/1.1 requests produce HTTP/1.0 responses?

https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=HTTP_cookie&oldid=813682729#Setting_a_cookie

SoniEx2 (talk) 19:08, 7 December 2017 (UTC)

Cookie Cupboards[edit]

By a cupboard of cookies, I mean the apparent "container" of that set of cookies which a browser can currently see.

The article does not clarify whether cookie cupboards on a computer are shared between different users or are individual to each user (it seems obvious that they should be individual, but maybe a superuser can do more?).

The article does not clarify whether cookie cupboards on a computer are shared between different browsers or are individual to each browser (it is not clear to me what is, and what should be, the case).

94.30.84.71 (talk) 20:57, 25 February 2018 (UTC)