Talk:Model railroad layout

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Untitled[edit]

OK. i've got this going, lets see what we can do

--Alexander101010 00:12, 17 October 2006 (UTC)

This link in External References: http://nevada-railways.net/page05.html – Model Railroad Track Plans now results in Error 404 Not Found, so I have removed it. Perhaps someone can fix it and restore it. --JFistere (talk) 01:41, 28 September 2013 (UTC)


Rabbit Warren definition .... The origin of this goes back to John Armstrong. This type of layout is elevated so that you can walk under the tables. This creates an area under the layout that Armstrong characterized as a "rabbit warren". The definition has NOTHING to do with the track design! See the "Design Handbook of Model Railroads" (1979) by Paul Mallery. Chapter 3, section 3.3 Benchwork Types (diagram E-Rabbit Warren) "Suitable only for rooms with adequate ceiling height is benchwork where the access aisles are interconnected by full headroom passages under the railroad as at E in Figure 9. Suggested as early as 1951, this form of benchwork, called rabbit warren after John Armstrong, has seldom been used even though it places the least restrictions on layout design." Note: Mallery was a member of The Model Railroad Club located in New Jersey, which used the rabbit warren design approach. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2001:5B0:29FF:1EF0:0:0:0:33 (talk) 12:39, 10 March 2015 (UTC) ... Ken Coulon Jacksonville, TX

C J Freezer (long time editor of a model railway magazine in UK) refers to 'rabbit warren' layouts as in the text. Murray Langton (talk) 18:20, 8 December 2013 (UTC)