Talk:Potassium

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Good article Potassium has been listed as one of the Natural sciences good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it.
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changeover to WP Elements[edit]

Article changed over to Wikipedia:WikiProject Elements format by User:maveric149. Elementbox converted 11:57, 1 July 2005 by Femto (previous revision was that of 23:29, 26 June 2005).

Information Sources[edit]

Some of the text in this entry was rewritten from Los Alamos National Laboratory - Potassium. Additional text was taken directly from USGS Periodic Table - Potassium. Other information was obtained from the sources listed on the main page but was reformatted and converted into SI units.

Production of Metal[edit]

The article states that "thermal methods" are used to prepare potassium. Is this referring to the reduction of molten potassium chloride with sodium vapor? If so, it should be more specific.

US-UK difference[edit]

The 2004 guidelines of the Institute of Medicine specify a Dietary Reference Intake (DRI]) of 4,700 mg of potassium (100 mEq); most Americans consume only half that amount per day.[85][86] Likewise, in the European Union, in particular in Germany and Italy, insufficient potassium intake is somewhat common.[87] However, the British NHS recommends a lower intake, saying that adults need 3,500 mg per day and that excess amounts may cause health problems such as stomach pain and diarrhoea.[88]

Does anyone know why there's such a large difference between the recommended daily intake in the USA and in the UK? The British NHS guidance suggests that the American recommended daily intake is actually unhealthy. Epa101 (talk) 21:18, 22 May 2017 (UTC)
The ref to British NHS does identify high potassium as potentially causing stomach pain an diarrhea, but does not reference that statement. A quick search of science lit did not find supporting lit. I am loath to delete the text. However, high potassium and health risks in adults appears to be at 8,000+ mg/day. The U.S. DRIs do not stipulate and upper limit for potassium, so there is no evidence there that 4,700 mg (U.S.) could cause symptoms that the lower value in UK guidance do not. David notMD (talk) 21:23, 29 July 2017 (UTC)

Source[edit]

Which source tell us that all these uses are due to the properties of chromate ion containment rather than potassium ions? Newone (talk) 15:52, 2 August 2017 (UTC)

The phrase "chromate ion containment" is fairly weird, but this is rather obvious due to chemistry: K+ is mostly used as a generic counter-cation that gives no really distinct chemistry of its own and sits around contented. I would imagine that you would be able to source this by looking up chromates in Ullmann, for example, and seeing that the chemistry described that makes all these applications possible is wholly that involving CrO2−
4
instead of K+; I can check this later today. Double sharp (talk) 23:39, 2 August 2017 (UTC)
@Newone:  Done Double sharp (talk) 15:46, 3 August 2017 (UTC)
@Double sharp: What a pity that I cannot read it online. Newone (talk) 22:03, 4 August 2017 (UTC)