Talk:Siddi

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POV[edit]

"Siddis are categorized into two groups: the Zanji Siddis were brought to Pakistan and India by the Arabs as soldiers during their first Islamic invasion of the sub-continent in 712 A.D"

The Arabs came as traders and the primary invaders in the subcontinent were turks, persians what have you...and what does "Islamic invasion" mean? They were just territorial annexations and the Jihad cause was not espoused. 121.240.34.114 (talk) 04:53, 7 November 2008 (UTC)

DNA[edit]

"The remaining 30% of Siddi had Indian or Near Eastern-associated clades, including haplogroups H, L, J and P.[4]" The problem with that is that they are probably all originally 'negrito' haplogroups. Haplogroup P common among the Semang and the Andamanese. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negrito#Origins Haplogroups D, C, F left Africa about 50,000 years ago. Later haplogroups evolved among the Negritos in Asia. Female haplogroup L3 generated M1, the oldest female haplogroup outside of Africa. The Andamanese for instance have haplogroup M32. MrSativa (talk) 00:17, 24 April 2017 (UTC)

Deleted text[edit]

I removed this text dump which is apparently for a program of unexplained relevance. Details of an international conference with a large number of speakers on the Siddis, being held in Goa in January 2006. Needs to be wikified:

The Siddis of India and the African Diasporas in Asia


For more details contact Jean-Pierre Angenot jpangenot@hotmail.com

Goa, India, from 9th to 20th of January 2006 at The International Centre, Goa, India [see: www.internationalcentregoa.com ]

Promoted by

  • THE TADIA SOCIETY [The Society for Research, Culture, Education and Development of the African Diaspora in Asia (TADIA)], associated with the UNESCO Slave Route Project, India.

The Siddi or Siddhi people are Indians of mainly North-East and East African descent, whose ancestors arrived in India from the 1st to the 19th century. The Siddis came from Africa as slaves, soldiers, sailors and merchants. The earliest African presence in India was on the Konkani Coast as a result of the Arab slave trade. The 17th century saw the largest influx of Siddis, as many were sold to Hindu princes by Arab and Portuguese slave traders, and mainly used as domestic servants and farm labourers. Some Siddi slaves escaped into the forests to form their own communities. Siddis occasionally rose to prominence — a few rulers of Bengal in the 15th century were Siddis, and during the British colonial period Siddis attained military and governmental leadership positions. Rough estimates put their population at 20 to 30 thousand, mostly living in the state of Gujarat. Since they are generally dark-skinned, they occupy the bottom rung of the Indian caste system, and exist mainly on the margins of Indian society. Siddis have adopted the indigenous religions (most Siddis are Muslim), food, and customs of India; though remnants of their African heritage are retained in their music. Siddis are employed mainly in the agricultural sector. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siddi

Co-promoted by

  • FEDERAL UNIVERSITY OF Rondônia - UNIR, Porto Velho, Brazil
  • Moulana AZAD NATIONAL URDU UNIVERSITY - MANUU, Hyderabad, India
  • National Law School of India University - NLSIU, Bangalore, India
  • KARNATAK UNIVERSITY - KUD, Dharwad, India
  • UNIVERSITY OF ALCALA, Afro-Ibero-American Studies, Madrid
  • University of California at Los Angeles - UCLA, Los Angeles, USA
  • Institute for Technical Support to Third World Countries, Brasília

· ALIANCA BRASIL-ÍNDIA, Londrina, Brazil

Sponsored by

  • FORD FOUNDATION, New Delhi
  • THE PRINCE CLAUS FUND FOR CULTURE AND DEVELOPMENT, Amsterdam
  • CALOUSTE GULBENKIAN FOUNDATION, Lisbon

CO-ORGANISERS:

  • Kiran Kamal Prasad (The TADIA Society & Jeeta Vimukti
 Karnataka Organisation, Bangalore, India)
  • Jean-Pierre Angenot (Federal University of Rondônia, Brazil)

Members of the organiSation steering committee :

  • Francis Guntipilly (The TADIA Society & Centre Ashirvad,
 Bangalore, Karnataka, India)
  • Rustom Bharucha (Writer, Kolkata, West Bengal, India)
  • Geralda de Lima Angenot (CEPLA Research Centre, Federal
 University of Rondonia, Guajara-Mirim, Brazil)
  • Amy Catlin-Jairazbhoy (University of California at
 Los Angeles, USA) 

PROGRAMME SCHEDULE and TIMETABLE:

  • Academic Discourses: 10-14 January 2006
  • Interaction day between Scholars and Siddis
 15 January 2006
  • Festival of African and Afro-diasporic
 Song, Music, Dance and Drama: 15-18 January 2006
  • Festival of African and Afro-diasporic Cinema:
 15-19 January 2006
  • Workshop on Socio-Economic Development Strategies
 for Siddis: 16-19 January 2006
  • History Tour: from 20 January 2006

MONDAY 9 JANUARY 2006

AFTERNOON

From 12.00  : ARRIVAL OF DELEGATES AT INTERNATIONAL CENTRE, GOA 13.00  : LUNCH 14.00 - 18.00  : REGISTRATION from 14.00  : EXPOSITION OF AFRICAN AND AFRO-DIASPORIC PICTURES

                 (private collection of Edouard Vincle)

19.00  : WELCOME RECEPTION

               : performance of  the Sidi Goma, Black Sufis of
                 Gujarat musical group **.

Tuesday 10 JANUARY 2006

08.00  : BREAKFAST 08.45 - 09.45  : REGISTRATION

09.45 - 11.00  : OPENING CEREMONY

Master of Ceremony Francis Guntipilly (The TADIA Society & Centre Ashirvad, Bangalore, India). Chairperson: Jean-Pierre Angenot (Federal University of Rondônia, Brazil) Chief Guest: Margaret Alva, Winner of the 2005 International Nelson Mandela Award for Minority Empowerment, United Nations, New York. Ali Moussa Iye, Chief, UNESCO Slave Route Project, Division of Cultural Policies and Intercultural Dialogue, Paris Miguel Neneve, International Assessor of the Rector, Federal University of Rondonia, Brazil. Luis Beltran , UNESCO Chair on Afro-Ibero-American Studies, University of Alcala de Henares, Madrid, Spain. Clodomir Santos de Morais, founder of the Institute for Technical Support to Third World Countries, Brasilia, Brazil. John Kosta Siddi, President, TADIA Society, a Project associated to the UNESCO Slave Route Project, India. Farida Al Mumbrik Sidi, Vice-President, TADIA Society. Kiran Kamal Prasad, co-organiser of the conference

11.30 - 12.45  : Keynote address 1 (Hall A) Chairperson and presenter: Rustom Bharucha (writer, Kolkata, India) * Gwyn Campbell McGill University, Montreal, Canada "The Afro-Asian diaspora: Myth or reality?"

14.00 – 16.00: THE WESTWARDS AND THE EASTWARDS AFRICAN DIASPORAS (Hall A) Chairperson: Luis Beltran, UNESCO chair on Afro-Ibero-American Studies, University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain * Carlos Moore, The University of the West Indies, Republic of Trinidad & Tobago "Toward a new Pan-Africanism for a globalized world" * Sheila S. Walker Afrodiaspora, Inc., Washington, DC, USA “Mozambique kingdoms with Congo queens: The unsuspected pan-africanism of the Americas”.

  • Carole Boyce Davies African-New World Studies, Florida

International University, Miami, USA. "The encyclopedia of the African diaspora: An overview". * Claudio C. Pinheiro Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil "Translating worlds, inventing empires: Reflections on colonial projects, language and slavery at the early modernity Portugal"

16.30 - 17.30  : GENERAL DISCUSSION, Coordinator: Rustom Bharucha (Writer, Kolkata, India)

20.30  : VIDEO SESSION: AISHA BILKHAIR KHALIFA, "Spirit Possession Practices in the United Arab Emirates". Benigna Zimba, "Slave Routes and Oral Tradition in Southeastern Africa: History in Images" (60 minutes).

WEDNESDAY 11 JanUARY 2006

09.00 - 10.00  : Keynote address 2 (Hall A)

Chairperson: Jean-Pierre Angenot (Federal University of Rondonia, Brazil) Ali Moussa Iye, Chief, UNESCO Slave Route Project, Division of Cultural Policies and Intercultural Dialogue, Paris. "The UNESCO Slave Route Project: New orientations".

10.30 - 13.00  : THE SIDDIS IN ANDHRA PRADESH (Hall A) Chairperson: Bonginkhosi A. Bhutana Sikhondze (University of Swaziland, Kwalusemi). Fitzroy Andre Baptiste, University of West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, West Indies. "African-descended communities in the Indian sub-continent: from invisibility to visibility". Ababu Minda Yimene Max-Plank Institute, Halle, Germany "Dynamics of ethnic identity among the Siddis of Hyderabad". Rekha Pande, Moulana Azad National Urdu University, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India. "The socio-cultural world of the Siddi women of Hyderabad", Shahida Murtaza Moulana Azad National Urdu University, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India. "The status of girls among the African diaspora in Hyderabad". Nicholas Glean. University of Sunderland, United Kingdom. "Deccani historical discourse and the Siddis: An introductory examination of the representation of the Siddis in historical literature".

14.30 - 16.30  : THE AFRICAN DIASPORA IN THE NEAR EAST AND IN THE MIDDLE EAST (Hall A) Chairperson: Manolo Florentino (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil).  Aisha Bilkhair Khalifa Harvard University, Boston, USA "Secrecy and the circulation of knowledge among African musical groups in the United Arab Emirates". Ehud R. Toledano Tel-Aviv University, Israel "Taming the new with the familiar: Enslaved Africans in the Ottoman empire". Galia Sabar Tel Aviv University, Israel "New forms of slavery or unique communities of international migrant workers? Sub-Saharan Africans in Israel: 1984-2004". Esma Durugonul Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey "Afro-Turks in the region of Antalya"

or

14.30 - 16.30  : HYBRID AFRICAN IDENTITIES (Hall B) Chairperson: Teotônio R. de Souza (Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias, Portugal)  Catherine M. Miller IREMAM-CNRS, Aix-en-Provence, France "An African diaspora within an Afro-Arab country : West Africans in the Sudan" Benigna Zimba Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique "Consumption of female cloth: An aspect of Mozambique and Indian cultures (early century to ca. 1950s)". Miguel Neneve Federal University of Rondonia, Brazil "Literature as means of decolonization: African literature in Portuguese" Michael Weeder St Philip's Rectory, Capetown, South Africa "Naming the dead: the challenges surrounding the uncovering of a slave burial ground in Cape Town".

17.00 - 18.30  : THE AFRICAN DIASPORA IN THE NEAR EAST AND IN THE MIDDLE EAST 2 (Hall A) Chairperson: Ineke van Kessel (African Studies Centre, Leiden, Netherlands) Niambi Cacchioli University of London, Birkbeck College, United Kingdom "The hidden narrative: Representations of African slavery in Persian memoir literature". Fitzroy Andre Baptiste University of West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, West Indies "Habshis in late 18th C.E. Afghanistan: A research note" Vittorio Morabito University of Catane, Italy "Contacts between Ethiopia, Yemen and India in 17th century"

or

17.00 - 18.00  : AFRO-ASIAN INTERFACES (Hall B) Chairperson: Eva Maria Sebestyen (Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary). Jonathan R. Walz University of Florida, Urbana, USA "Afroasian interfaces: Archeological perspectives in connections and diaspora". Edouard Vincke Belgian Cooperation Ministry, Brussels, Belgium "Gestures with the hands: An anthropological reading and a method for an intercultural comparison (India-Mozambique-Congo)". Jeanette Pinto Sophia College & The Heras Institute of Indian History and Culture, Mumbai, India "African Slavery and Christian humanism in Portuguese Goa".

18.30 - 19.30  : GENERAL DISCUSSION, Coordinator: Rustom Bharucha (Writer, Kolkata, India).

20.30  : VIDEO SESSION : Amy Catlin-Jairazbhoy "From Africa to India: Sidi Music in the Indian Ocean Diaspora" (74 minutes). "The Sidi Malunga Project: Rejuvenation of the African Musical Bow in India" (46 minutes)

THURSDAY 12 JANUARY 2006

09.00 - 10.00  : Keynote address 3 (Hall A) Chairperson: Francis Guntipilly (TADIA Society & Centre Ashirvad, Bangalore, India)  Teotonio R. De Souza Universidade Lusofona de Humanidades e Tecnologias, Portugal "”Alforria" before abolition of slavery in Goa: 17th-18th Centuries”

10.30 - 13.00  : THE SIDDIS IN MAHARASHTRA (Hall A) Chairperson: Maude Dikobe (University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana) * Beheroze Shroff University of California at Irvine, USA "Sidis in Bombay" * John E. McLeod University of Louisville, USA "Shifting marriage-patterns among the Sidis of Janjira and Sachin" * Anuradha Bhattacharjee Delhi "Jews in Siddi Janjira" * Ivan Vander biesen Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium "The economic basis for acculturation processes in the 19th century Indian Ocean: the importance of the Omani-Zanzibar connection with the Indian Subcontinent" * Clifford J. Pereira Black & Asian Studies Association, London, United Kingdom "Return to Africa: The 'Bombay Africans' and the Freretown settlement".

14.30 - 16.30  : THE AFRICAN DIASPORA IN THE INDIAN OCEAN (Hall A) Chairperson: Oziel Marques da Silva (Federal University of Rondonia, Brazil) * Abdul Sheriff & Arnold J. Temu Zanzibar Museums The Open University of Tanzania, Dar-Es-Salaam, Tanzania "The 'Zanzibaris', an African diaspora in South Africa: a puzzle" * Gwyn Campbell McGill University, Montreal, Canada "The significance of the Malagasy slave trade in the Indian Ocean" * Beatrice Nicolini Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan, Italy "A glimpse to Indian merchant communities in Zanzibar during 1800: the Topan family through British archive sources" * Bonginkhosi Sikhondze University of Swaziland, Kwaluseni, Swaziland "The Indian ocean theatrical social, economic and politial dynamics contribution to the Indian and Atlantic African diaspora in the 16th and 19th centuries".

or

14.30 - 16.30  : THE AFRICAN DIASPORA IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARRIBEAN (Hall B) Chairperson: Geralda de Lima Angenot (CEPLA Research Center, Federal University of Rondonia) * Luis Beltran UNESCO chair on Afro-Ibero-American Studies, University of Alcalá, Madrid, Spain "Iberian American African heritage" * Maude Dikobe University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana "Crossing borders: Gender and ethnicity in calypso, the case of Dropatee Ramogonnai" * Kabengele Munanga University of Sao Paulo, Brazil "The contemporary descendants of enslaved Africans in Brazil: Current situation and problems" * Manolo Florentino Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil "Comparative aspects of the traffic of Africans to Brazil (18th – 19th Centuries)".

17.00 - 18.30  : THE AFRICAN DIASPORA IN THE INDIAN OCEAN 2 (Hall A) Chairperson: Esma Durugönül (Aknediz University, Antalya, Turkey) * Tracy Sharpley-Whiting Vanderbilt University, Nashville, USA "Reunion Island, the black diaspora, and the new Europe". * Edward L. Powe Researcher, Madison, USA "Songoru, a black leader in the Maldives". * Daniella Police Michel University of Mauritius, Reduit, Mauritius "From the slave of African descent to Mauritian Creole: the new anthropos".

or

17.00 - 18.30  : THE AFRICAN DIASPORA IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARRIBEAN 2 (Hall B) Chairperson: Kabengele Munanga (University of São Paulo, Brazil). * Eva M. Sebestyen Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary "Angolan roots in a North East Brazilian umbanda cult" * Catherine Barbara Kempf & Mary L. Galvao Federal University of Rondonia, Guajara-Mirim, Brazil "Fortune and misfortune of a 'mocambo' in the Bahian Reconcavo" * Eduardo Judas Barros State University of Londrina, NEAA, Brazil "African diaspora in Brasil: The negro front and the black movement" Mary L. Galvao & Catherine Barbara Kempf State University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil & Federal University of Rondonia "Quilombola midwives of the Bahian Reconcavo: Language, rituals and symbols".

18.30 - 19.00  : GENERAL DISCUSSION, Coordinator: Rustom Bharucha (Writer, Kolkata, India)

20.30  : 4 BOOK LAUNCHES: (a) Kiran Kamal Prasad (2006). In Search of an Identity: An Ethnographic Study of the Siddis in Karnataka. Bangalore: Jana Jagrati Prakashana. 179 pp. (b) Kenneth X. Robbins & John E. McLeod, eds. (2006) African Elites in India: Habshi Amarat. Ahmedabad: Mapin Publishers (c) Nicolini, Beatrice. Makran, Oman and Zanzibar: Three-Terminal Cultural Corridor in the Western Indian Ocean (1799-1856). Islam in Africa, 3. Leiden, Holland: Brill Academic Publishers. (d) Benigna Zimba, Edward Alpers & Allen Isaacman (2005). Slave Routes and Oral Tradition in Southeastern Africa. FILSOM Entertaiment, Maputo.

22.30  : VIDEO SESSION

SERGIO CAMPOS & NATACHA ROMAO: “Osmosis: Karnataka Siddis” (35 minutes)

FRIDAY 13 JANUARY 2006

09.00 - 10.00  : Keynote address 4 (Hall A) Chairperson: Fitzroy Andre Baptiste (University of West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, West Indies) LaToya Shanae Beck University of California, Berkeley, USA "African presence or African diaspora: Double consciousness and the African diaspora".

10.30 - 13.00 : THE SIDDIS IN KARNATAKA 1 (Hall A) Chairperson: Benigna Zimba (Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique) Pashington Obeng & Henry John Drewal Harvard University & University of Wisconsin- Madison, USA “Religion and arts of Siddis of Karnataka”

  • Francis Guntipilly The TADIA Society & Centre Ashirvad,

Bangalore, India 'Siddis and Jesuits in Mundgod' * Sonia Miegakanda Bouketo Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France "The evolution of the status of the Karnataka Siddis from the 15th Century to at the present time". Timothy D. Walker University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, USA "Abolishing the slave trade in Portuguese India: Documentary evidence of popular and official resistance to crown policy, 1842-1860

14.30 - 16.00: THE SIDDIS IN KARNATAKA 2 (Hall A) Chairperson: Miguel Neneve (Federal University of Rondonia, Brazil) * Pramod B. Gai Karnatak University, Dharwad "DNA Profiling of Siddi of Karnataka" * Prakash V. Patil Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Belgaum, Karnataka "Pattern of anemias in Siddis of Karnataka by blood analysis" *  Valdir Vegini, Selmo A. Apontes & F. da Silva University of Joinville, Brazil, Federal University of Acre & CEPLA UNIR, Brazil "Some phonetic and phonological peculiarities of the Siddi-Konkani language".

or

14.30 - 15.30: THE AFRICAN DIASPORA IN THE FAR EAST (Hall B) Chairperson: Aisha Bilkhair Khalifa (Harvard University, Boston, USA) * Ineke van Kessel African Studies Centre, Leiden, Netherlands "African soldiers in the Netherlands East Indies (Indonesia)" * Kim Bok-Rae Center for International Area Studies, Seoul, South Korea "African presence in Korea"

16.30 - 17.30  : Hall A session continuation Chairperson: Jacinta Castelo Branco Correia (Federal University of Rondonia, Brazil) * Geralda de Lima Angenot & Oziel Marques da Silva CEPLA Federal University of Rondonia, Brazil "The Portuguese and the African influences on the Siddi-Konkani language" * Jean-Pierre Angenot & Selmo Azevedo Apontes Federal University of Rondonia & Federal University of Acre, Brazil "The influence of the Dravidian sub-apical palatal articulation type on the retroflexed consonants of the Indo-Aryan Siddi-Konkani dialect".

17.30 - 18.30  : GENERAL DISCUSSION, Coordinator: Rustom Bharucha (Writer, Kolkata, India)

20.00  : VIDEO SESSION :  Sheila Walker "Scattered Africa: Faces and Voices of the African Diaspora" (55 minutes) * Beheroze Shroff "We´re Indian and African: Voices of the Sidis" (22 minutes) and "Voices of the Sidis: Ancestral Links"(26 minutes).

SATURDAY 14 JANUARY 2006

09.00 - 10.00 : Keynote address 5 (Hall A) Chairperson: Rustom Bharucha (Writer, Kolkata, India)* Kiran Kamal Prasad The TADIA Society & Jjeeta Vimukti Karnataka Organisation, Bangalore, India "Race, caste, class: the dilemmas confronting the Siddis in Karnataka".

10.30 - 13.30 : THE SIDIS IN GUJARAT AND THE SHIDIS IN PAKISTAN (Hall A) Chairperson: Abdul M. Sherif (Zanzibar Museums, Tanzania) * Amy Catlin-Jairazbhoy University of California, Los Angeles, USA "Consequences of international touring among Sidis of Gujarat: A developmental perspective"

  • Sabir Badal Khan University of the Studies of Naples, Italy

"On the music of the Shidis in Pakistan" * Abdulaziz Y. Lodhi Uppsala University, Sweden "Linguistic evidence of Bantu origins of the Sidi of Gujarat and the Shidi of Balochistan"

  • Pedro Machado New York University "The African slaving and

slavery worlds of Gujarati merchants: the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries" * Rizwan Kadri, Shree Swaminarayan Arts College, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India "African Sidisi diaspora in Gujarat and their cultural contribution".

14.30 - 16.00: SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE SIDDIS 1 (Hall A) Chairperson: Francis Guntipilly (TADIA) * Clodomir S. de Morais Institute for Technical Support to Third World Countries, Brasilia, Brazil "Integrated system of capacitation and scientific researchs for the regional development" * Jacinta C. B. Correia Federal University of Rondonia, Brazil "Learning from Africa" * Henry John Drewal & Pashington Obeng University of Wisconsin- Madison Harvard University, Boston, USA "Stitching and survival: The Siddi women's quilting cooperative of Northern Karnataka"

16.30 - 17.30  : SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE SIDDIS 2 (Hall A) Chairperson: Clodomir Santos de Morais (Institute for Technical Support to Third World Countries, Brasilia, Brazil) * S. Japhet National Law School of India University - NLSIU, India a piece on the socio-legal situation of the Karnataka Siddis * Rachana Govil Deputy Director, Sports Authority of India, New Delhi & Arjuna Awardee "Impact of sports on socio-economic status of Siddi community in India".

17.30 - 18.00  : NOTE ADDRESS BY THE DIRECTOR OF CASA ASIA, SPAIN Chairperson: Luis Beltran, UNESCO chair on Afro-Ibero-American Studies, University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain Jon de la Riva Director, Casa Asia, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain "A bridge between Spain and Asia"

18.00 - 19.00  : INTERACTIVE SESSION BETWEEN SIDDIS AND SCHOLARS: A BALANCE Coordinators: Kiran Kamal Prasad (The TADIA Society, Bangalore, India) & Rustom Bharucha (Writer, Kolkata, India)

20.30  : VIDEO SESSION :  Desmond Nazareth & Christopher Rego "Souls and Spices" (70 minutes)

SUNDAY 15 JANUARY 2006: INTERACTION DAY BETWEEN SCHOLARS AND SIDDIS

10.30 - 13.00  : FRATERNIZATION FETE

14.00 - 15.30  : Women’s songs leading to Session with Henry Drewal : the manufacture of quilts

16.00 - 17.40  : Festival of African and Afro-diasporic Cinema FILM 1 DRUM. South Africa. d. Zola Masoko. In English and Zulu with English subtitles. 2004. 100 min.

20.00  : Festival of African and Afro-diasporic Song, Music, Dance and Drama. Bad Shaha MUSICAL GROUP from MUMBAI

MONDAY 16 JANUARY 2006

WORKSHOP ON SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES FOR SIDDIS:

10.30 - 12.30  : Mapping: Homes, villages, the forest. Listing of economic and social resources. Sharing different contexts of everyday life and struggle.

14.00 - 15.45  : SITUATIONAL IMPROVISATIONS leading to Autobiographical TESTIMONIALS.

16.00 - 17.35  : Festival of African and Afro-diasporic Cinema FILM 2 PAUL ROBESON: TRIBUTE TO AN ARTIST. U.S.A. Saul J. Turell In English. 1979. 30 min. FILM 3 BLACK GIRL. LA NOIRE DE... Senegal. d. Ousmane Sembene. In French with English sub-titles. 1966. 65 min

20.00  : Festival of African and Afro-diasporic Song, Music, Dance and Drama Gujarati Sidi Goma MUSICAL GROUP from Ahmedabad KARNATAKA MUSICAL GROUP from LaLguli, YELLAPUR

TUESDAY 17 JANUARY 2006

WORKSHOP

10.30 - 12.30  : Rituals of birth, marriage, death.

14.00 - 15.45  : Continuation of social rituals: Discussion of their economic implications. Reflection on performances seen on the first two nights with the performers and organiSers like Amy Catlin.

16.00 - 17.55  : Festival of African and Afro-diasporic Cinema FILM 4 : LUMUMBA. Congo/U.S.A. d. Raoul Peck. In French with English subtitles. 2000. 115 min.

20.00  : Festival of African and Afro-diasporic Song, Music, Dance and Drama KGN Arabic Duff band from HYDERABAD Jamming of different Siddi musical groups.

WEDNESDAY 18 JANUARY 2006

14.00 - 15.45  : Discussion of actual ways of earning a living : problems, possibilities, and the need for organization. Question-and-answer session with Clodomir on income generation.

16.00 - 17.47  : Festival of African and Afro-diasporic Cinema FILM 5: SUGAR CANE ALLEY (RUE CASES NEGRES) Martinique/France. d. Euzhan Palcy. In French and Creole with English subtitles. 1983. 107 min.

20.00  : Festival of African and Afro-diasporic Song, Music, Dance and Drama MANCHIKERI SIDDIS PLAY, Manchikeri, Karnataka. 

THURSDAY 19 JanUARY 2006

9.00 - 12.00  : Questions, recommendations, strategies, DREAMS socio-economic development projects possibilities of forming an All India Siddi Federation preparation of the First International Gathering in Africa of African Descendants living in Asia, to be held in January 2009 in an African country (Mozambique? Zanzibar? Djibouti?) with a possible future proposal of forming an All-Asia Afro-diasporic Federation.

16.00 - 17.37  : Festival of African and Afro-diasporic Cinema FILM 6 : THE OTHER FRANCISCO (EL OTRO FRANCISCO) Cuba. In Spanish with English subtitles. Sergio Giral. 1975. 97 min.

20.00  23.22  : AFRICAN CINEMA FESTIVAL: FILM 7 : MOOLAADE. Senegal/Burkina Faso. d. Ousmane Sembene. In French and Bambara with English subtitles 2004. 202 min.

ABSTRACTS IN ABSENTIA

List of abstracts from scholars who cannot be present for the conference these will be published together with the other abstracts:

Alan Baxter Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia The African presence in Macau

Alberto da Costa e Silva Brazilian Academy of Letters, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil a piece on the Afro-Brazilian history

Ali Jihad. Racy University of California, Los Angeles, USA The life history of the lyre: Musical exchange between Asia and Africa

Behnaz Mirzai Asl Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas, USA African slaves in Iranian history

Clovis Albano de Santana Pontifícal Catholic University of Sao Paulo, Brazil Programme of autoemployment: the practice of the Large-scale Capacitation Method in the urban milieu

Edward A. Alpers University of California, Los Angeles, USA African diaspora music in the Southwest Indian Ocean

Ivan Labra Moya & Isabel Rodriguez de Labra IATTERMUND, Santiago, Chile & Harare, Zimbabwe Community organisation across cultures: Lessons learnt from the contextualisation of the Organizational Workshops to Southern Africa

Ivo Carneiro de Sousa University of Porto, Portugal Africans in the colonial and post-colonial formation of Eastern Timor

Joseph E. Harris Howard University, Washington, USA Global African diaspora studies: Its emergence and development

Julio Santana Braga State University of Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil The dynamics of the Afro-Brazilian ancestrality

Juan Jose Rojas Hererra, Jesus Morett Sanchez, Luis Gerardo E. Hernandez Maria Belén H. Pacheco University of Chapingo, Mexico The Mexican expertise in the practice of the Organization Workshops for Job Creation and Income Generation, with a special attention to the areas reached by the African diaspora.

Liliana Mosca University of the Studies of Naples "Federico II", Italy The slave trade in Madagascar in the second half of the XVIIc. from trough the lens of some Anglo-American sources

Luz Maria M. Montiel National Autonomous University of Mexico The African presence in Mexico

Miguel Sobrado National University of Costa Rica, San José, Costa Rica The state of the XXIst Century

Shihan de S. Jayasuriya University of London., United Kingdom Music and memories: Oral traditions in an Indian ocean island

Tiffany Ruby Patterson Hamilton College, New York, USA Unraveling African 'consciousness' in India

Vijayalakshmi Teelock University of Mauritius, Reduit, Mauritius African slave trade to Mauritius: The Mozambican slave trade to Mauritius in the 18th and early 19th centuries. NickelShoe 23:02, 28 December 2005 (UTC)

Africans were not native to India?[edit]

Whoever wrote this article has one flawed assumption. The indigenous peoples of the Indian subcontinent were NOT AFRICANS, meaning NEGROIDS! THEY WERE NEGRITOS AND AUSTRALOIDS WHICH ARE FOUND ONLY IN ASIA AND AUSTRALIA, NOT AFRICA! People get so ignorant when they say the original Indians were negroes. I have nothing against people of African descent, no offense but I am merely trying to point out an often ignored fact, Negroids are native to Africa and have never migrated to Asia prior to the slave trade. Just because Negritos and Australoids happen to have features somewhat resembling Negroids and happen to be called black, it doesnt mean they are actually negroid. I hope people understand that. -User: Afghan Historian

Are you serious? because every human came from Africa at one point, "Negritos" and "Australoids" may have different genetics, but thats due to them being in different locations for so long.

Yes all humans comes from Africa, but those that left 70,000 year ago became other races. Only those that never left or left much later are actually Black or Negroid. The fact that Negritos and Australoids have different genetics means they are a different race from Blacks, despite their dark skin.--Editingoprah 03:29, 6 August 2006 (UTC)

We resolved this in the black people article. Siddi and others who retain the distinctive qualities that allow black africans to also be recognized as black..... they are black too. So EO and I disputed this, but in the end he acknowledged that this narrow view of blackness (being that it only comes from Africans and recent migrations out of Africa) is unjustifiably conclusive. The Negritos and Australoids differ in two ways, they differ in their location and they differ in their culture. They are still black in the broad sense and need not fit a narrow one. Furthermore I took out the request for a citation in the description of Siddis and other East Indians recently from Africa coming as something other than slaves. A [citation needed] would be required for someone to prove (which the burden rests) that ONLY slaves came from Africa. --Zaphnathpaaneah 05:58, 22 September 2006 (UTC)

People Of "Siddi" origin, an African tribe in Gujarat, India[edit]

Siddi people are of "African Origin" who were presented as slaves by the Portuguese to the local Nawab of Junagadh, a feudal lord. The Portuguese island colony in Gujarat was Dieu, now a union territory of an independent India part of Union Territory of Goa, Daman & Dieu.

Today some of the "Siddis" live in their own villages but follow all local Gujarati customs, language, food and religion. Apart from looking obviously African just like people living in Africa they are indistinguishable from local Indian people living in Junagadh region of Gujarat, everything else is same, except it seems they still practice their African dance, now known by the Indian name of Dhamal.

Siddis live around Gir Forest National Park and Wildlife Sanctuary, the last refuge in the world of the almost extinct Asiatic Lions, in Junagadh a district of the state of Gujarat, India.

"On the way to Deva-dungar is the quaint village of Sisvan, inhabited entirely by Siddis, a tribe of African people. They were brought 300 years ago from Africa, by the Portuguese for the Nawab of Junagadh. Today, they are more Indian than African and follow very few of their original customs, with a few exceptions like the traditional Dhamal dance."

Source:

http://travel.expressindia.com/story/20499.html

Habshi not necessarily same as siddi[edit]

Just wanted to point out that the term 'habshi' is not necessarily the same as 'siddi'. While a Siddi would be from an person in South Asia of East African origin, 'Habshi' refers to any black African person, and is used as such. No idea how I would incorporate such a change into the current article (as well as creating a new article for 'habshi'?), so I added this here.

This usage has flipped over time. Habashi used to strictly mean Abyssinian in India, i.e. Ethopian, since India has had really old trading relations with Ethiopia/Abyssinia/Habash. The origins of the term Siddi are uncertain, but there seems to be widespread belief that it comes from Sayyid, which could (in this context) just mean a Muslim or a Muslim Noble. Not all Siddis are likely to have been Habashi, i.e. Ethiopian/Eritrean. At some point during the 20th century, Habashi simply came to mean any Black African and the term Habash just stopped being used in popular speech. So, a Nigerian could now be called Habashi, which by traditional Indian usage would be incorrect. --Hunnjazal (talk) 03:47, 29 April 2009 (UTC)

See also[edit]

Sid, Siddi, Sayyid, Sayyad, As-Siyd are all West African Islamic terms which discribes the "best of the best" African warrior whose good and brave qualities are inharited at birth from a line of brave and honorable male ancestors extending far back into the bloodline, thus giving birth to the English word "seed". The Andalusian heroic Knight "El-Cid" was correctly called Al-Siyd or As-Siyd and was thusly named by the Muslims conquors who invade Spain for two reasons: 1. He was brave and honorable; 2. He was very dark of skin. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.80.199.193 (talk) 20:33, 20 March 2008 (UTC)

External Links[edit]

Atulsnischal 13:51, 10 January 2007 (UTC) It should not surprise well read people to hear that The Cid legend was actually about a Black Man as there were many descendants of captured Moors living in Andalusia, such as characters in Don Qixote. Many of them were mulattos children resulting from unions between Moors (African Muslims)and European/Hispanic Christians. Some of them rose to high positions in Andalusion society and having lost all knowledge of their original language, religion and culture became true Christians. Rodrigo Diez De Vivar is one example of the Christianized Moor raised and living in Spain at the time of the second and third invasion of the Moors of West Africa. This story was not ALL legend. Another example of this situation, that occured some years later in Europe,is the case of Alexandre Dumas(Mulatto), his father and grandfather who were Black men who became famous soldiers in France and England. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.80.199.193 (talk) 21:00, 20 March 2008 (UTC)

The origin of the name Siddi[edit]

I don't see consensus on this in literature. There are many hypotheses on this, and some speculation on the part of various authors, researchers and Siddis themselves. All this should be reflected with references. --Hunnjazal (talk) 03:59, 8 May 2009 (UTC)

76.65.183.25 and other similar IPs are constantly and in a single tracked way removing refs describing one hypothesis of the name. Won't discuss it here either for some reason. Possibly a sock for someone else since their contrib history seems pretty small, yet knows enough to quote (quite incorrectly) WP:OR, etc. Basic motive seems to be to deny a hypothesized Siddi-Sidamo link or slant the names section towards a specific direction (i.e. "Siddi is derived from Sayyid"), when contending hypotheses also exist. --Hunnjazal (talk) 06:38, 18 May 2009 (UTC)

Merge[edit]

I suggest merging Makrani and African Pakistani into this page. Both are short fragments with info already contained here. African Pakistani was already suggested for merge back in June and there's been no discussion (so I assume noone objects). If anyone objects/agrees please comment here. Tobus2 (talk) 10:45, 7 November 2013 (UTC)

Yeah, redundant fragments; merging/redirects here should cover it. Soupforone (talk) 01:32, 8 November 2013 (UTC)

I've deleted the content on those to pages and replaced them with redirects to here. Tobus2 (talk) 07:57, 13 November 2013 (UTC)

Alright. Soupforone (talk) 01:48, 14 November 2013 (UTC)

Absurd 'Captains of the Slave Ship' Theory[edit]

Can the "shiddi refers to the captain of the ship that brought the slaves" theory from a single indian newspaper article be removed please. It is absurd. If that were true, most of them would be called 'Purtagali' instead of Shiddi.

What's more likely is -> Arabic speaking North African/Abyssinian/Egyptian black visitor to India call each other Siddi (Sayyidi)-> Siddi becomes generic term for blacks in India -> Sub-Saharan black slaves pronounce it shiddi -> Community of former slaves becomes known as the 'Shiddi' people — Preceding unsigned comment added by 113.203.171.139 (talk) 11:51, 9 January 2014 (UTC)

The "captains" theory comes from an award winning book by well-published history professor Vijay Prashad, not a "single indian newspaper article" as you say and the Etymology section also lists other theories. If you have an alternate theory stated in a WP:RS then I'm happy to add it, but we're not going to remove the "captains" one just because you don't like it. Tobus (talk) 00:07, 10 January 2014 (UTC)

Hello, linguistics is not Professor Vijay Prashad's forte, he claims that one theory is that the "Captains of the Slave Ships" were Sayyids so the slaves became Sayyidi and that a second theory is that the "Captains of the Slave Ships" were from Abyssinia (Habasha) so they became known as Habashi. Can you please point to one recognized linguist who holds either of these theories. 175.110.208.146 (talk) 16:26, 18 February 2014 (UTC)

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Siddis of Shahjahanabad Delhi during the reign of Aurangzeb Aalamgir[edit]

There are two areas at Old Delhi's ridge area and Karol Bagh.

The first located approximately 3 kilometres south of the Hindu Rao Hospital and the British built 1857 war memorial and the Saint Stephen's Church is an ancient graveyard of the Mughal days of Emperor Aurangzeb Aalamgir and is called Bagh Shidi Gauhar. This may have been a large garden in the days of Aurangzeb and may have encompassed a four square kilometre area from the Mughal Eidgaah in the south and Sabzi Mandi at north and Bara Hindu Rao at East and Karol Bagh at west. The name Shidi Gauhar appears in the 1) Maasir i Aalamgiri by Saqi Must'ad Khan, Maasir Ul Umaraa by Nawwab Shamsuddaula Shah Nawaz Khan, 2) Siyar Ul Mut'aakharin by Khafi Khan and 3) The history of Aurangzeb by Sir Jadu Nath Sarkar with reference to an Abyssinian Amir related to the famous Sidi Anbar of Khidki, present day's Aurangabad. Shidi or Sidi Gauhar was a panj hazari mansabdar and had lived at Shahjahanabad but had returned to Daulatabad and died there. His garden today is the privatized graveyard of Delhi's Punjabi Saudagaran community better known as Anjuman Wakil Qaum Punjabiyan.

The second located at Old Delhi's Karol Bagh area's East Park Road is called Shidipura. No traces of any Mughal period building or monument exist here but legend has it that this was where a Sidi or Shidi community that had migrated from the Deccan during the days of Emperor Aurangzeb used to stay in prominence. It very well could have been the residence of Sidi or Shidi Gauhar. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Lutfullah (talkcontribs) 16:13, 24 January 2017 (UTC)

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