Talk:Yoshiro Nakamatsu

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Unverifiable claims[edit]

As there is no verifiable facts in his claims, why isn't the wiki page about him saying anything about that? About floppy, wikipedia has a much more reliable page in which he does not appear. Same thing for the CD, inventors are clearly known. Considering that a CD is about lasers, hi tech electronics (back then at last), and many technologies unaviable to the public at the time of the invention, i don't see how a man with no known lab supporting him, no source for experimental parts, no links to academic research, could have invented such a device. I'm willing to admit that a single man can create something like the spring shoes, but not such a big enginering project...

About digital watch, the same comments can be made.

And when it comes to cinemascope, the concept have been invented in 1928 (see wikipedia page). So he can't have invented this since he wasn't born. The real cinemascope have been released in the 50ies, but how could he claim to have invented something that did exist?

The fact that no academic paper can be found is another proof that this man is clearly lying. I was also unable to find anything about his academic cursus, as he claims to be Dr. Nakamats. I am currently doing a thesis (computer science), and this is not something that can be done without being known in the scientific community. At least not when you claim to be the most prolific inventor in human history...

He claims to have been chosen by the U.S. Science Academic Society as a great inventor, but this society does not even exist.

Considering that there is no proof of any of his claims, and that many of what he says can be proven to be lies, i don't see why anyone would believe anything he says or give him credits for his "works"... —Preceding unsigned comment added by 92.160.82.128 (talk) 03:17, 23 October 2010 (UTC)

Comment 1[edit]

It's highly doubtful that he invented floppy disk. The article (floppy disk) shows another story. And Japanese wikipedia also deny it. Maybe he invented something concerning the FD patent?Hans castorp81 21:25, 7 Dec 2004 (UTC)

He is somewhat famous for claiming things which are almost certainly not true. He allegedly claimed that a huge parade was held in Denver, Colorado in his honor, when in reality Denver has likely never heard of him. Although I think a check on him shows he did have in least 17 genuine patents--T. Anthony 10:32, 21 October 2005 (UTC)

After reading a related story on wikipedia concerning the Ig Nobel awards, my curiosity was aroused about his accomplishments. A search with the US patent office did find the following United States Patent #4,490,765 Filed by Nakamats on December 25, 1984 with the title of "Diskette for cleaning a floppy-disc drive head". I can also confirm T. Anthoy's report that there are 17 patents filed with the US PTO (United States Patent and Trademark Office) from 1976 - Present with a citation to "Nakamats" -- 71.11.202.171 23:54, 5 November 2005 (UTC)

A citation in patents does not mean that the new patent is based in some way on the cited patent. Patents are cited by other patents so that the cited patent cannot be used to invalidate the current patent in court, as the US system assumes two things: 1) that the patent examiner has fully considered all cited patents as to whether they are prior art, and 2) that US patent examiners are infallible. As a result, patent applications tend to cite a lot of marginal material that they want to ensure does not become a legal problem. Nakamatsu has had 6 U.S. patents granted since 1976 (the year that searchable electronic records begin at the USPTO) AlexBartlett4 (talk) 07:26, 28 November 2010 (UTC)

In addition to the claims above, it seems he says he invented the compact disc, the fuel cell, components of the aircraft autopilot system (at the age of five), a car which runs on water, a cigarette that makes a person smarter, and a chair that cools a person’s head and warms his feet to induce clarity of thought, as well devices allowing his house to run entirely on "cosmic energy" (on which he seems reluctant to elaborate). This guy is, without a doubt, a crackpot. -- LuminaryJanitor 10:03, 28 January 2006 (UTC)

So how do you voice those doubts in the article in an NPOV way and without doing original research? Need to find an existing source that neutrally and honestly considers the validity of his claims? The article seems misleading the way it is now, with so few hints at the potential looniness. Weregerbil 14:44, 28 January 2006 (UTC)
There is a good reference at ドクター中松小事典 - in Japanese. The author gives a reasonably thorough NPOV analysis on the claims made by Nakamatsu. And yes, many of them are pretty exaggerated. It seems to be true that he gets royalty from IBM though. Otherwise he won't be able to afford his office located in one of the most expensive districts in Japan (which means in the world), especially since his other inventions - such as "Flying shoes" or the Cerebrex chair - won't generate much cash. --BorgQueen 17:29, 29 January 2006 (UTC)
That reference wouldn't really be practical, as some questions could be raised as far as verifiability. Any reliable translations available? --wtfunkymonkey (talk) 01:32, 27 November 2008 (UTC)
I have added some information from the USPTO (Nakamatsu has had only 6 US patents granted since 1976) that is verifiable. Also, even if Nakamatsu had the 3,200 patents he claims, he would still not be the most prolific inventor. That is (verifiably) Australian inventor Kia Silverbrook. AlexBartlett4 (talk) 07:26, 28 November 2010 (UTC)
I have had an attempt at correcting the bias of this article, using verifiable information from the various patent office databases. As patents are published documents, use of this information is verifiable, and is not original research. I have tried to be as NPOV as possible, but how do you disprove a bizarre claim such as to be elected to the Knights of Malta (a Christian military order started in the middle ages, and a significant part of the crusades)? One can only add "he claims" to the claim. AlexBartlett4 (talk) 00:37, 9 December 2010 (UTC)


Reliable information on Nakamatsu's patents[edit]

I have started an article on prolific inventors I am trying to track down the patents of Yoshiro Nakamatsu, aka Dr. Nakamats. He claims to have over 3000 patents. If true, this would put him top of the list. However, it seems somewhat unlikely ;-) that this is true as he also claims to have invented many things which he clearly did not invent. A search of the USPTO website gives only six patents, but there may be many more patents issued before 1976. If his claim of 3000 patents is true, it would likely be for a total of worldwide patents, and almost certainly mostly Japanese patents. Even more likely, this would refer to Japanese patent applications, as in Japan a patent can be filed without being examined. It is published after 18 months, and then is "laid open" for up to 7 years before the inventor elects whether to pay for examination. Does anyone know a source of some reliable information on Nakamatsu's patents? AlexBartlett4 (talk) 06:50, 12 October 2009 (UTC)

There is an argument his prolific inventions on this blog (Japanese). While the list of his "inventions" have sources, it could have cited him and therefore wouldn't be reliable. I think Wikipedia articles should distinguish what he claims from what the governmental authorities approve his patents. --Aphaia (talk) 15:04, 11 March 2010 (UTC)
Hi. I'm the author of the Japanese blog that Aphaia mentioned. I think the way the source article tells of his "inventions" shows that the author was not really sure that Dr Nakamats had actually invented those familiar things. Read the IHT article (now hosted at nytimes.com) carefully and think again. It seems to me that it's pretty obvious that almost everything needs "he claims". (Sorry I haven't got an English Wikipedia account.) --210.131.41.125 (talk) 03:10, 12 March 2010 (UTC)
It would be interesting to include Dr. Nakamatsu in the list of prolific inventors. However, after continued searching, the only evidence that I can find that he has made over 3,000 inventions is because he says so. As mentioned, the US patent office lists only 6 utility patents. Of course, electronically searchable records do not extend to before 1976, so there are undoubtedly some that are not caught by a search on the USPTO. However, of the six that are listed, the dates are: 1978, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1983, and 1991. If the rate of 6 patents over the last 32 years is anything to go by, Dr. Nakamatsu may have a further 10 patents or so - not enough to make it onto the list of prolific inventors. It also appears that his claim to have invented the floppy disk is false. From what I can tell, his inventions in this area were for analog audio recording media, though with similar enough physical format and features to the floppy disk format that IBM saw fit to license his patents to avoid potential conflicts. As the Floppy disk was introduced by IBM in 1971, patents on the original 8" format would have expired by 1991 at the latest, so any royalties would have ended then, if not sooner. From this, and from other material on the web relating to Dr. Nakamatsu, it would appear that he is primarily a self-promoter, and not a particularly prolific inventor. There are many aspects of the IHT articlethat would require serious validation before I would give them any credence. Try this for example: "Mr. NakaMats, 66, has won top honors at the International Exposition of Inventors in New York seven years running. Ten American cities have declared a "Dr. NakaMats Day" to commemorate his visit." AlexBartlett4 (talk) 09:06, 16 March 2010 (UTC)

3 paragraphs about patents in a biography's introduction[edit]

I understand the obsession of many people about Nakamatsu's claims over patents, but three paragraphs about the patent registering system in the introduction to his biography is clearly ridiculous. Those three paragraphs are not even relevant to Nakamatsu, and IF included, they should be in a separate section, at the end (after a strong cleanup).

Again, after the introduction, another section about claimed inventions and how horrible Nakamatsu is for claiming the floppy disk invention.

Seriously, this article needs a fresh start. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Antonio.bustamante (talkcontribs) 21:12, 20 December 2010 (UTC)

Thanks for the comments. I knew that the article wasn't good, but couldn't see how to fix it while remaining within original research and WP:BIO. I've made a host of changes, and would appreciate any further comments. AlexBartlett4 (talk) 10:32, 22 December 2010 (UTC)

Title[edit]

Based on the rule of recognizability, shouldn't the article be named "Dr. Nakamats"? After all, that's what the day proclaimed by the American cities is called (at least as claimed by the article; whether it is true or not, is another story), and gives about double the number og googlits. Also, the article about Madonna is called that, not "Madonna Louise Ciccone".--Mycomp (talk) 03:39, 4 December 2012 (UTC)

bad link in refs[edit]

Bad link the reference #9 leads to better homes and gardens website. i think this is the right link. https://truefalsefilmfestival.wordpress.com/2010/02/26/review-the-inventions-of-dr-nakamats/ im not sure how to use wiki editing but i hope this helps — Preceding unsigned comment added by 209.122.228.52 (talk) 06:20, 22 October 2015 (UTC)

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